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Thread: FLU419 SEE HMMH HME Owners group

  1. #3841
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    TM 24P-2 fig0237.jpg
    Looks like the mil called it a check valve, and it seams like it might actually port pilot pressure to move the valve spool. Electric over hydraulic over hydraulic... weird.
    The whole assem. ( 3-18 ) is NSN 4820-01-243-4805.
    Part Target page is; http://www.parttarget.com/4820-01-24...C-E898CF0BAE21
    Look for parker valves using the Diamler SKU number there. This might take some digging and phone calls.

    Edit;
    Just found this too..
    https://www.newcenturycomponents.com...20-01-243-4805
    Last edited by Pinsandpitons; 05-11-2018 at 13:15.

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  3. #3842
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pinsandpitons View Post
    TM 24P-2 fig0237.jpg
    Looks like the mil called it a check valve, and it seams like it might actually port pilot pressure to move the valve spool. Electric over hydraulic over hydraulic... weird.
    The whole assem. ( 3-18 ) is NSN 4820-01-243-4805.
    Part Target page is; http://www.parttarget.com/4820-01-24...C-E898CF0BAE21
    Look for parker valves using the Diamler SKU number there. This might take some digging and phone calls.

    Edit;
    Just found this too..
    https://www.newcenturycomponents.com...20-01-243-4805
    The loader and tool circuit valves are standard Parker items. I was going to buy the double solenoid one from a hydraulics supply house but MrSEE had a more attractive deal for the valve section (I am going to add a third circuit to the front for winch or 4 in one bucket)

    I will post the Parker number tonight when I have a chance to look at my notes.
    Last edited by alpine44; 05-11-2018 at 18:20.
    1990 FLU419 SEE
    1986 M1009, 6.2L engine, 700R4/NP241, 4.10:1 14 bolt 8 lug rear, 10 bolt 8 lug front, 4" lift, 34.5" tires
    1993 M998 2-man troop carrier - SOLD
    MEP002A generator
    Gichner Expandable ISO shelter = my machine shop

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  5. #3843
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    Quote Originally Posted by lurkMcGurk View Post
    Question for hydraulic Savy folks out there. 90% sure I know this is a solenoid. Is the part I have circled in red, a Solenoid? As deduced by searching the TM-5-2420-224-20-1 Page 3-316. ? This picture shows a front loader stacking valve in its entirety but I am only interested in the pieces circled.Attachment 727926
    I know it controls the front loader and one of the pieces I have circled has a slow leak. the slow leak is out the top of it. Mine, like the picture are not capped as they are on other FLU419s. Uncapped is how they are sold , and how mine are on the Mog currently. I'm wondering if this is a broken seal or just find a cap for it type of fix, opposed to a complete replacement. I couldn't find it as a part number but found this diagram denoting as a part of a trouble shooting process.
    Attachment 727927Attachment 727928


    before I start twisting the nut down or off and/or unplugging things I figured I would ask. I am also curious to know if this is a common and replaceable piece (solenoid) or if I should tear it down and try to rebuild it. Where or how to find parts would be great. Any input is appreciated. Thanks
    You may want to ask MrSEE what he wants for the tool circuit valve section he has in stock from parting out an SEE. That should give you the parts you need.

    I am also posting the Parker number of these valves later.
    1990 FLU419 SEE
    1986 M1009, 6.2L engine, 700R4/NP241, 4.10:1 14 bolt 8 lug rear, 10 bolt 8 lug front, 4" lift, 34.5" tires
    1993 M998 2-man troop carrier - SOLD
    MEP002A generator
    Gichner Expandable ISO shelter = my machine shop

  6. #3844
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speedwoble View Post
    I wanted to use my hammer drill to drill a hole in my concrete block foundation. But first I had to figure out an electrical issue that was keeping the tool circuit from working. The last time I tried to use it, it didnít work when turned on from the tool switch. So I switched the wires to the loader control valve and the tool valve and taped down the momentary loader rocker switch to engage the tools.
    So I knew the hydraulics worked and needed to troubleshoot the electrical system. I determined I had wire continuity and power at the switch, but no power out of the switch. The tool circuit switch is a dual pole switch with one pole engaging the high idle and the other pole should engage the hydraulics.
    I removed the switch and disassembled it. It is definitely not waterproof and had a small amount of corrosion on the contacts. Also worth noting, the cups that hold the contacts in the switch are indexed to the shaft with machines flats, so attempting to turn the shaft will damage them. I had to straighten mine. Polished the contacts, reassembled everything, and I had a working tool circuit!
    Using the hammer drill on a horizontal block wall was a challenge. Even on the lowest setting, it would bounce away from the wall. Clearly made for vertical drilling. Eventually I got the hang of it and it was making quick progress. The hole punched through and I went to the basement to inspect. The solid block had a large blowout on the inside of the wall. Crud. I think this may have been because my 1Ē bit is dull and the carbide is missing, so it was hammering through the wall instead of drilling. I found a place that claims they can rebuild them and will update once I have one done.
    I used the rockdrill recently to drill blast holes into a granite outcropping and was impressed how well that worked.
    My Pionjar gasoline powered rockdrill is about 50% faster for the same 1-1/4" diameter but also a whole lot heavier and more tiring to work with. Plus the hydraulic hammerdrill is already on the machine I use to cover the blast with dirt and then for the removal of the fragmented rock.
    Disadvantage of the SEE drill is the relative short bits. This pretty much necessitates high explosives in the small and short bore holes. I used 60% NG Dynamite in the first blast and then DETA sensitized Nitromethane in little plastic bottles. Both with great success and under ATF license.
    Last edited by alpine44; 05-11-2018 at 18:59.
    1990 FLU419 SEE
    1986 M1009, 6.2L engine, 700R4/NP241, 4.10:1 14 bolt 8 lug rear, 10 bolt 8 lug front, 4" lift, 34.5" tires
    1993 M998 2-man troop carrier - SOLD
    MEP002A generator
    Gichner Expandable ISO shelter = my machine shop

  7. #3845
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    [QUOTE=alpine44;2130426 This pretty much necessitates high explosives in the small and short bore holes. I used 60% NG Dynamite in the first blast and then DETA sensitized Nitromethane in little plastic bottles. Both with great success and under ATF license.[/QUOTE]

    Man, that sounds like fun. Or having a blast, if you will.

  8. #3846
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    Quote Originally Posted by The FLU farm View Post
    Man, that sounds like fun. Or having a blast, if you will.
    There is a lot of grueling work (drilling) and preparation (loading and hook-up) needed before you can flip the switch or push the button. But I have noticed that even professional blaster who do this for a living will chuckle or laugh when a shot goes off. There is something inherently satisfying about unleashing a lot of energy in a very short time frame to get a job done.

    I chose this tool because it was the more efficient and economical choice compared to breaking up several cubic yards of granite with a jackhammer. Once the new tool is there and mastered, you'll find other uses (up-rooting trees for example) and wonder how you could have managed so long without it. Very similar experience to owning a FLU419 (or in your case the whole family).

    BTW: The ATF agent who came to inspect my storage magazines did not hesitate for one second to leave his SUV in our driveway and join me for a ride in the SEE. Big grins were had by all.
    1990 FLU419 SEE
    1986 M1009, 6.2L engine, 700R4/NP241, 4.10:1 14 bolt 8 lug rear, 10 bolt 8 lug front, 4" lift, 34.5" tires
    1993 M998 2-man troop carrier - SOLD
    MEP002A generator
    Gichner Expandable ISO shelter = my machine shop

  9. #3847
    4 Star General The FLU farm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alpine44 View Post
    There is a lot of grueling work (drilling) and preparation (loading and hook-up) needed before you can flip the switch or push the button. But I have noticed that even professional blaster who do this for a living will chuckle or laugh when a shot goes off. There is something inherently satisfying about unleashing a lot of energy in a very short time frame to get a job done.

    I chose this tool because it was the more efficient and economical choice compared to breaking up several cubic yards of granite with a jackhammer. Once the new tool is there and mastered, you'll find other uses (up-rooting trees for example) and wonder how you could have managed so long without it. Very similar experience to owning a FLU419 (or in your case the whole family).

    BTW: The ATF agent who came to inspect my storage magazines did not hesitate for one second to leave his SUV in our driveway and join me for a ride in the SEE. Big grins were had by all.
    Yeah, I didn't think that the actual drilling and prep work would be all that fun. That's why I would bring a camping chair and an umbrella drink if I ever came to watch you having a blast.

    Oh, and a handheld CB, just to keep you on your toes.

  10. #3848
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    CB71BF61-8772-44DC-98A8-BA46105F0DEE.jpg
    Bought two at county auction two months ago. One running and operating well, the other not running then, now running. Learning a lot and chasing down all the little issues. Great forum and great TM support. FLU Farm has been big help. Located in south east iowa. On the coast.

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    I recently bought an Flu419 and am having lots of troubles. I know it may sound foolish , first what type of fluid do I use for the power steering?

  13. #3850
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    Motor oil for the FLU419 power steering. Drain the water out first.

    Search for "lubrication order FLU419" and download the other pertinent manuals posted on expeditionimports.com or Rocky Mountain Moggers as well. Read them a couple of times cover to cover and life with your FLU419 will be a lot easier.
    Last edited by alpine44; 05-13-2018 at 16:02.
    1990 FLU419 SEE
    1986 M1009, 6.2L engine, 700R4/NP241, 4.10:1 14 bolt 8 lug rear, 10 bolt 8 lug front, 4" lift, 34.5" tires
    1993 M998 2-man troop carrier - SOLD
    MEP002A generator
    Gichner Expandable ISO shelter = my machine shop

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    The FLU farm (05-13-2018)

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