Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 102

Thread: M135 M211 2 speed transfer case mod

  1. #81
    Colonel DUUANE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    253
    Thanks
    97
    Thanked 121 Times in 62 Posts

    Default So near..but yet so far

    Ok..ive been looking for a new woodruf key as the one that came out is definately hash. Closest i can find so far wasnt very close..ill do some more digging this week and hopefuy be able to assemble the shafting.
    Then itll be on to modifying the shift fork and shaft, making a new cover and some gaskets.

    Cheers
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #82
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Woodinville, Washington
    Posts
    7,639
    Thanks
    2,207
    Thanked 6,058 Times in 3,010 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DUUANE View Post
    Ok..ive been looking for a new woodruf key as the one that came out is definately hash. Closest i can find so far wasnt very close..ill do some more digging this week and hopefuy be able to assemble the shafting.
    Then itll be on to modifying the shift fork and shaft, making a new cover and some gaskets.

    Cheers
    Try here https://www.huyett.com/ . I've gotten all the woodruff keys for the Spicer 3052/3053 transmission here. Hardened "Alloy" steel too.

  3. #83
    Colonel DUUANE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    253
    Thanks
    97
    Thanked 121 Times in 62 Posts

    Default

    Ill have a look thanks..the key that came out wasnt hardened..probably for a reason i think..it was beat but the shaft and keyway were mint..so it will be the "fuse" . It doesnt make sense to me that they would use a key instead of a spline there. Ill have to go over the power flow again and see if i can figure it out.

  4. #84
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Woodinville, Washington
    Posts
    7,639
    Thanks
    2,207
    Thanked 6,058 Times in 3,010 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DUUANE View Post
    Ill have a look thanks..the key that came out wasnt hardened..probably for a reason i think..it was beat but the shaft and keyway were mint..so it will be the "fuse" . It doesnt make sense to me that they would use a key instead of a spline there. Ill have to go over the power flow again and see if i can figure it out.

    Keys are much cheaper to make then splines. Also keys are never used as "fuses" . When they go they cause extreme damage to the shafts and gears. Get the hardened "alloy" woodruff keys.

    I need to edit this post. "Keys" used to be used as "fuses" when they where made from really mild steel (can you say 1950's !) . They could completely shear off the shafts back then. Now not so much as most keys are alloy steel. At least in transmissions and most all automotive gear systems.
    Last edited by rustystud; 12-05-2018 at 01:43.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to rustystud For This Useful Post:

    DUUANE (11-17-2018)

  6. #85
    Corporal
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    South East Queensland Australia
    MVPA
    MVPA #9678
    Posts
    31
    Thanks
    22
    Thanked 17 Times in 11 Posts

    Default

    Good day Duuane,
    I try to use as many Caterpillar parts as I can in restorations, mostly because the parts are made to imperial measurements. The keys for instance will be made to a very high standard, bolts have the thick head as used on most American wartime vehicles. I use the thick head bolts as much as possible for safety reasons, my spanner doesn't slip off as easily. Cat hardened washers really are hard. The water pump seal out of a D6 9U series pilot motor fits all GMC, Chev and Bedford water pumps, you have to grind 2 of the tangs off the carbon part. I can't remember which, D4 or D6 but I think it is D4 7U pilot motor exhaust gaskets fit Ford flat head manifolds.

    Ken
    1954 M216Cdn Canadian registration # 54-56169
    1942 CCW 353 Ex RAAF

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to Ken S For This Useful Post:

    DUUANE (11-17-2018)

  8. #86
    Corporal
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    W. KY
    Posts
    46
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 23 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rustystud View Post
    Keys are much cheaper to make then splines. Also keys are never used as "fuses" . When they go they cause extreme damage to the shafts and gears. Get the hardened "alloy" woodruff keys.
    The never word is very strong. I immediately think of a Briggs&Stratton flywheel "key" that's made of aluminum and (the way I see it) designed to shear to avoid bending a connecting rod. Maybe it's not a true "key"?

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Ashley P For This Useful Post:

    DUUANE (12-05-2018)

  10. #87
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Woodinville, Washington
    Posts
    7,639
    Thanks
    2,207
    Thanked 6,058 Times in 3,010 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashley P View Post
    The never word is very strong. I immediately think of a Briggs&Stratton flywheel "key" that's made of aluminum and (the way I see it) designed to shear to avoid bending a connecting rod. Maybe it's not a true "key"?
    Look at revised post.

  11. #88
    Colonel DUUANE's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    253
    Thanks
    97
    Thanked 121 Times in 62 Posts

    Default

    Well the one that came out sure isnt hard..a couple of passes with a file and there was no doubt. Im kinda on the fence with the hard..i can see the consequences both ways and it aint good either way.
    The gat dang drydock is sucking all my time..another 13 hours in the frozen wind tunnel tonight..ive had no spare mental energy to think this through..ill get there..but it may be a while. Powerflow is always where the answer lies.
    If i remember correctly the gears on that shaft are dogged together and they transmit the torque. The shaft supports the gears and the bearings allow rotation. The only function the key serves that i can see is to prevent relative motion between the gears and shaft and i think the only time that would be likely is shifting in or out of neutral or in a coast/float condition.
    More study will make it clearer.

  12. #89
    Corporal
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    W. KY
    Posts
    46
    Thanks
    48
    Thanked 23 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rustystud View Post
    "Keys" used to be used as "fuses" when they where made from really mild steel (can you say 1950's !) . They could completely shear off the shafts back then.
    Well, isn't the subject matter pertaining to "early deuces" which are made in the 1950s? I don't know squat about most deuce matters, as mine is modified and I've only put a few dozen gallons of fuel through it in 6(?) years. But mechanically there's always a "weak link". In the drivetrain it's often the tire grip on a light vehicle, but with a loaded deuce perhaps the tires won't slip and something else in the drivetrain has the potential to "give" if the engine doesn't die. Perhaps some study of gearing (ratios) could give an idea of what forces could be on that gear/keyway to determine if the preference would be for it to break or the other most likely failure. If the keyway failure could save the transmission, it might be worth it.

    Maybe I'm thinking out loud. Anywho, have fun in the drydock. (As if that's possible in the winter in Canada. )

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Ashley P For This Useful Post:

    DUUANE (12-08-2018)

  14. #90
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Woodinville, Washington
    Posts
    7,639
    Thanks
    2,207
    Thanked 6,058 Times in 3,010 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ashley P View Post
    Well, isn't the subject matter pertaining to "early deuces" which are made in the 1950s? I don't know squat about most deuce matters, as mine is modified and I've only put a few dozen gallons of fuel through it in 6(?) years. But mechanically there's always a "weak link". In the drivetrain it's often the tire grip on a light vehicle, but with a loaded deuce perhaps the tires won't slip and something else in the drivetrain has the potential to "give" if the engine doesn't die. Perhaps some study of gearing (ratios) could give an idea of what forces could be on that gear/keyway to determine if the preference would be for it to break or the other most likely failure. If the keyway failure could save the transmission, it might be worth it.

    Maybe I'm thinking out loud. Anywho, have fun in the drydock. (As if that's possible in the winter in Canada. )
    You would think so, but the reality is they really didn't understand gears like we do now. That is 1950's knowledge they where using. In the last eighty years we have learned a thing or two. We now know the damage caused by any failure of the drivetrain including keys giving way causes way to much damage. They "used" to think a safety "fuse" was needed in all driveline components. Manufactures no longer view transmissions or differentials or transfer-cases that way. The "U"-joint has become the safety fuse in all drivetrains today. Far cheaper and more easily repaired. The damage from a key failing is extensive. Usually the shaft is destroyed along with the gear the key was holding. Not much of a "fuse" really. By keeping the parts together your saving future failures from happening. With parts becoming "few and far between" this is the wiser course of action.

  15. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to rustystud For This Useful Post:

    Ashley P (12-09-2018), DUUANE (12-09-2018)

Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •