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Thread: M60 repair

  1. #31
    Moderator WillWagner's Avatar
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    I have a Q, if you go back to post 6, pic 4, you will see a tube coming from the turbo outlet, routed fwd, around the intake and they terminate at the air boxes. When the engine runs, there is exhaust noise and heat coming out of them at the front of the engine, but no exhaust. Anyone know what these are for? The TMs we have are Army, not USMC and do not show them. They are on both sides.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillWagner View Post
    I have a Q, if you go back to post 6, pic 4, you will see a tube coming from the turbo outlet, routed fwd, around the intake and they terminate at the air boxes. When the engine runs, there is exhaust noise and heat coming out of them at the front of the engine, but no exhaust. Anyone know what these are for? The TMs we have are Army, not USMC and do not show them. They are on both sides.
    I have to say at the moment, that I don't recall those at all....Rustystud might have a better idea, he was also at Camp Pendleton as a Motor-T mechanic around the same time I was. Sorry Will!

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    Moderator WillWagner's Avatar
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    Last update fro a bit until we address the other issue. Attempted to remove the drilled broken bolts, found that they were helicoiled previously. The bolt wouldn't come out, so I drilled incrementally to the correct size for tapping, was going to run a tap thru the hole and push what was left of the bolt threads out, well as I started to tap, the tap stopped, backed it out and found the reason, the helicoils. Used a pair of needle nose pliers and a pick and pulled the coils out, threasd were clean, ran the fine 3/8 thread chaser in the holes, looked good, so I reamed the holes in the throttle bracket to 3/8 and used 3/8 bolts to anchor it . Got the assembly back on, re installed the filter and fired it, seemed good! Hooked all the linkages up, fired it, idle was high. Adjusted the linkages, idled at a smooth 750 RPM. Buttoned the turret access door up and it was time to move the pig.
    We noticed that the LH rear most road wheel was higher than the rest, did not notice if it was this way before we tugged it out of it's resting place. While I was gone, some volunteers came out and lubed the road wheels. We had tried to move the road wheel with a bar, thinking there was a broken torsion bar, but it didn't move. I looked at the ground where it was sitting and saw that the LH track depression was apx 3 feet shorter than the RH side, so it was in this position before we started working on it. We decided to see if it was frozen. Put down a couple of 8x8 boards and drove the tank over them, the road wheel moved up and returned back to the position it was in. We put a 50T jack on the road wheel and a few 2x4s between the track and fender and a 4x6 between the jack and track. The jack pushed the road wheel down and when released, the road wheel came back to its position. I think, judging by all the other goofy things with linkages and other things, that the torsion bar was installed incorrectly. Decided to not drive it around the compound so we just moved it fwd and back a dozen or so times, a few neutral turns, some left-rights going forward and reverse. The barrel travel lock had broken bolts that held it to the deck lid. I d=tried drilling them out, but someone had welded studs to the broken bolts, so, I just drilled new holes and used 3 bolts. The tank ws put back in place with the help of BLKHMMWV. He actually drove it while I was checking out the road wheel issue! The torsion bar issue will be addressed another time, there are a couple of items that need attention for Museum representation next week for a Vet event.
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    One note for safety's sake, if you need to slave start (jump start) any armored vehicles, please do NOT place them nose-to-nose...place them 90-degrees opposed (as in an L-shape, or right-angles to each other). If one jumps into gear, you need to allow yourself an escape route if one vehicle lurches forward.

    No matter how careful you try to be, things happen...especially with 50- or 60-year old linkages that are rusty, sometimes they jump into gear with nobody putting any pressure on them.

    At Camp Pendleton (1st Tank Battalion) we lost a good Corporal that way; for whatever reason, he was in a hurry and brought another tank over and allowed them nose-to-nose while he strung the slave cables into each driver's compartment. During the slave start process, the tank brought over to provide the jump somehow jumped into gear and over-rode the driver's brake application. The Corporal was pinched between both bows, and was alive & talking until the tanks were pulled apart. When the tanks were pulled apart, he was gone.

    I didn't ever want to relive anything like that again. Rustystud might have been there at the time too, don't know if he remembers this or not.

    So please please please when slave starting tanks, armored vehicles, or any heavy equipment please place them at opposed 90-degree angles; this allows the person stringing slave cables an escape route in case things go wrong.

    Will, thanks for this thread, it's nice to see one of my old monsters come back to life! They are quite fun to drive and operate, just not much fun to maintain.
    Last edited by silverstate55; 12-02-2018 at 13:04.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillWagner View Post
    We noticed that the LH rear most road wheel was higher than the rest, did not notice if it was this way before we tugged it out of it's resting place. While I was gone, some volunteers came out and lubed the road wheels. We had tried to move the road wheel with a bar, thinking there was a broken torsion bar, but it didn't move. I looked at the ground where it was sitting and saw that the LH track depression was apx 3 feet shorter than the RH side, so it was in this position before we started working on it. We decided to see if it was frozen. Put down a couple of 8x8 boards and drove the tank over them, the road wheel moved up and returned back to the position it was in. We put a 50T jack on the road wheel and a few 2x4s between the track and fender and a 4x6 between the jack and track. The jack pushed the road wheel down and when released, the road wheel came back to its position. I think, judging by all the other goofy things with linkages and other things, that the torsion bar was installed incorrectly. Decided to not drive it around the compound so we just moved it fwd and back a dozen or so times, a few neutral turns, some left-rights going forward and reverse. The barrel travel lock had broken bolts that held it to the deck lid. I d=tried drilling them out, but someone had welded studs to the broken bolts, so, I just drilled new holes and used 3 bolts. The tank ws put back in place with the help of BLKHMMWV. He actually drove it while I was checking out the road wheel issue! The torsion bar issue will be addressed another time, there are a couple of items that need attention for Museum representation next week for a Vet event.
    The torsion bar may well be clocked incorrectly; the TMs should show the proper procedure to ensure that the torsion bar is clocked properly (there should be some tic marks to line up in road wheel arm housing). To remove the torsion bar, remove the inspection cover on the opposite side, and have 2 men standing by: one to hold the tanker's bar against the end of the torsion bar, and one with a BFH providing motivation & encouragement to the tanker's bar. This should drive the torsion bar out.

    It was not uncommon for the rear torsion bars to break and puncture the fuel cells. Did I mention already how much of a pain it is to remove a damaged/punctured fuel cell?

    Please keep up the good work, there aren't enough M60a1s left around, especially one in operating condition.

  8. #36
    4 Star General Guyfang's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverstate55 View Post
    One note for safety's sake, if you need to slave start (jump start) any armored vehicles, please do NOT place them nose-to-nose...place them 90-degrees opposed (as in an L-shape, or right-angles to each other). If one jumps into gear, you need to allow yourself an escape route if one vehicle lurches forward.

    No matter how careful you try to be, things happen...especially with 50- or 60-year old linkages that are rusty, sometimes they jump into gear with nobody putting any pressure on them.

    At Camp Pendleton (1st Tank Battalion) we lost a good Corporal that way; for whatever reason, he was in a hurry and brought another tank over and allowed them nose-to-nose while he strung the slave cables into each driver's compartment. During the slave start process, the tank brought over to provide the jump somehow jumped into gear and over-rode the driver's brake application. The Corporal was pinched between both bows, and was alive & talking until the tanks were pulled apart. When the tanks were pulled apart, he was gone.

    I didn't ever want to relive anything like that again. Rustystud might have been there at the time too, don't know if he remembers this or not.

    So please please please when slave starting tanks, armored vehicles, or any heavy equipment please place them at opposed 90-degree angles; this allows the person stringing slave cables an escape route in case things go wrong.

    Will, thanks for this thread, it's nice to see one of my old monsters come back to life! They are quite fun to drive and operate, just not much fun to maintain.

    Indeed. Anytime starting a tracked vehicle, is a good time to be to the side, and not in front or rear. This happened here in Bamberg, in the late 70's. The tank ( M60-A3 Rise) was at the wash rack, and when the driver started it up, the tank jumped in gear and pinned a young man between the bow and a concrete wall. It was the same deal. He was alive until they backed the tank away. It was right across the road from the dispensary. He never had a chance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guyfang View Post
    Indeed. Anytime starting a tracked vehicle, is a good time to be to the side, and not in front or rear. This happened here in Bamberg, in the late 70's. The tank ( M60-A3 Rise) was at the wash rack, and when the driver started it up, the tank jumped in gear and pinned a young man between the bow and a concrete wall. It was the same deal. He was alive until they backed the tank away. It was right across the road from the dispensary. He never had a chance.

    Yes sir, good advice there.

    Here's a couple of drawings I made up to illustrate the recommended positioning while slave starting armored/tracked vehicles:

    M60A1_Slave-Start_01.jpg M60A1_Slave-Start_01_524px.png

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  12. #38
    Moderator WillWagner's Avatar
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    We don't keep batteries in vehicles, so when we start anything, except mules, it always has someone in the seat, brakes applied and we announce we are going to fire and wait for replies. We are small, but very safe. All that are there are friends, it would suck to loose a friend just because someone got in a hurry.

    I heard a rumor that Edwards has 3 M60s, all running and driven alot. Heard they are used for targeting and heat signature dialing in.

    Anyone got a line on gun mantlet/gunshield cover and smoke grenade tube covers?

    We have two searchlights for the M60s. We put one on the tank with the brake issue, gonna tackle that soon, and hopefully we will get the other one on this one as well as all the ammo boxes, antennas, etc.
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