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Thread: M60 repair

  1. #41
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverstate55 View Post
    One note for safety's sake, if you need to slave start (jump start) any armored vehicles, please do NOT place them nose-to-nose...place them 90-degrees opposed (as in an L-shape, or right-angles to each other). If one jumps into gear, you need to allow yourself an escape route if one vehicle lurches forward.

    No matter how careful you try to be, things happen...especially with 50- or 60-year old linkages that are rusty, sometimes they jump into gear with nobody putting any pressure on them.

    At Camp Pendleton (1st Tank Battalion) we lost a good Corporal that way; for whatever reason, he was in a hurry and brought another tank over and allowed them nose-to-nose while he strung the slave cables into each driver's compartment. During the slave start process, the tank brought over to provide the jump somehow jumped into gear and over-rode the driver's brake application. The Corporal was pinched between both bows, and was alive & talking until the tanks were pulled apart. When the tanks were pulled apart, he was gone.

    I didn't ever want to relive anything like that again. Rustystud might have been there at the time too, don't know if he remembers this or not.

    So please please please when slave starting tanks, armored vehicles, or any heavy equipment please place them at opposed 90-degree angles; this allows the person stringing slave cables an escape route in case things go wrong.

    Will, thanks for this thread, it's nice to see one of my old monsters come back to life! They are quite fun to drive and operate, just not much fun to maintain.
    WOW ! This was the first time I read this post and the memories that have come back are crazy. Yes I was there when the corporal died. The question about the hoses on the sides of the engine is interesting. I remember we had an extra air intake for the crew for when we where river crossing or shore landing. The tanks could get completely submerged for up to several minutes at a time if they hit a soft sand spot. So there was a auxiliary air system that would trap water trying to enter the main compartment. It has been almost 40 years now and the mind is not as sharp as it once was.
    Also I have a service manual around here somewhere for the operation and general function of the M60 Tank. Last time I saw it was about 10 years ago though. If I come across it I will send it on down to you guys there. I also think I have the Hull TM here to somewhere.

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  3. #42
    Big Dummy silverstate55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rustystud View Post
    WOW ! This was the first time I read this post and the memories that have come back are crazy. Yes I was there when the corporal died. The question about the hoses on the sides of the engine is interesting. I remember we had an extra air intake for the crew for when we where river crossing or shore landing. The tanks could get completely submerged for up to several minutes at a time if they hit a soft sand spot. So there was a auxiliary air system that would trap water trying to enter the main compartment. It has been almost 40 years now and the mind is not as sharp as it once was.
    Also I have a service manual around here somewhere for the operation and general function of the M60 Tank. Last time I saw it was about 10 years ago though. If I come across it I will send it on down to you guys there. I also think I have the Hull TM here to somewhere.
    I've been doing a little research myself; I believe that the extra hoses from the exhaust back to the air filter boxes are an overpressure system to keep water out of the air boxes (air filters) while fording deep water...similar in concept to the fording valve on USMC Deuces to keep water from entering the bellhousing by supplying air pressure.

    I haven't been on a USMC M60A1 since Desert Shield/Desert Storm; immediately afterwards upon our return Stateside we were tasked with turning them in for the new M1A1s, but I never got to be trained on an Abrams due to being a short-timer after returning from 8 months in Desert Shield/Desert Storm.

  4. #43
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverstate55 View Post
    I've been doing a little research myself; I believe that the extra hoses from the exhaust back to the air filter boxes are an overpressure system to keep water out of the air boxes (air filters) while fording deep water...similar in concept to the fording valve on USMC Deuces to keep water from entering the bellhousing by supplying air pressure.
    Yes that is what I believe also. They also supplied air to the crew I believe. They do not connect to the exhaust system though. It draws air from the outside by the engine. It was just a system that would allow a few minutes under water.
    About the Abrams. I was at "Fort Knox" training on the M60's when they came on base. They were doing 72 miles an hour then ! It was funny to watch them go out each day. They would fly out in the morning, and then later you would see one or two being towed back in the afternoon ! That was when they decided to lower the turbines power since the transmissions could not handle it. Since the "new" Abrams were stationed next to the Marines tanks I got a lot of time to play around them. Real nice driver compartment and "Recaro" 7 way adjustable seat !

    So "Silverstate55" you where in the Marines too ? You where also an 1811 tank crewman ?
    Cool !
    Last edited by rustystud; 02-25-2019 at 02:19.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustystud View Post
    Yes that is what I believe also. They also supplied air to the crew I believe. They do not connect to the exhaust system though. It draws air from the outside by the engine. It was just a system that would allow a few minutes under water.
    About the Abrams. I was at "Fort Knox" training on the M60's when they came on base. They were doing 72 miles an hour then ! It was funny to watch them go out each day. They would fly out in the morning, and then later you would see one or two being towed back in the afternoon ! That was when they decided to lower the turbines power since the transmissions could not handle it. Since the "new" Abrams were stationed next to the Marines tanks I got a lot of time to play around them. Real nice driver compartment and "Recaro" 7 way adjustable seat !

    So "Silverstate55" you where in the Marines too ? You where also an 1811 tank crewman ?
    Cool !
    Yes sir, Dec 1985 to around mid-1988; then off to 29 Palms for a year, and finally to North Carolina for my last 3 years. C Company, 3rd Platoon. I did spend my last 6 months or so at Las Flores in A Company, HQ Platoon, as an AVLB Instructor (got to go to Ft Leonard Wood, MO, to learn about these). The Marine Corps got the AVLBs from the Army out of Anniston, IIRC, refurbished-as-new, with brand-new bridge sections we had to assemble. In 29 Palms & NC when I got there, there were already AVLB crews picked out, so I went to a normal line platoon as well as continuing to be a Marksmanship Instructor.

    I'm pretty sure we chatted via PM a while back about this, but we're both getting up there in years so I definitely can't hold that against you as I've had my share of CRS moments (just as Wes - simp5782 - my CRS drives him nuts!).

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    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by silverstate55 View Post
    Yes sir, Dec 1985 to around mid-1988; then off to 29 Palms for a year, and finally to North Carolina for my last 3 years. C Company, 3rd Platoon. I did spend my last 6 months or so at Las Flores in A Company, HQ Platoon, as an AVLB Instructor (got to go to Ft Leonard Wood, MO, to learn about these). The Marine Corps got the AVLBs from the Army out of Anniston, IIRC, refurbished-as-new, with brand-new bridge sections we had to assemble. In 29 Palms & NC when I got there, there were already AVLB crews picked out, so I went to a normal line platoon as well as continuing to be a Marksmanship Instructor.

    I'm pretty sure we chatted via PM a while back about this, but we're both getting up there in years so I definitely can't hold that against you as I've had my share of CRS moments (just as Wes - simp5782 - my CRS drives him nuts!).
    Your right, we did talk about this. My bad. As time goes on I can remember what I did 50 years ago, but what I had for breakfast I couldn't tell you ! That a$$hole who said the "Golden" years were the best should rot in **** for being such a liar !!! All I see that is Golden is in my pants since my prostrate is giving me fits !!!! You know what I mean don't you !

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  10. #46
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    Rusty...TMI man! I would like to find out what the piping is. I don't think it is for crew ventilation, I do not think it actually puts exh gasses into the boxes they attach to. Maybe some type of heating system? When running, there are pulses in the piping, no soot. If anyone comes out this way, let me know, we can check things out in person.
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  11. #47
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillWagner View Post
    Rusty...TMI man! I would like to find out what the piping is. I don't think it is for crew ventilation, I do not think it actually puts exh gasses into the boxes they attach to. Maybe some type of heating system? When running, there are pulses in the piping, no soot. If anyone comes out this way, let me know, we can check things out in person.
    I'm pretty sure it had to do with ventilation of the engine and cab. But it has been a long time and the mind does wonder !
    It might be in my "Hull TM". Now if I can just find it !

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    And, I think I might have stated somewhere that the other 60 did not have these pipes, well, it does too. Both were USMC tanks. The TMs we have are Army pubs. and do not show the piping. Without them there the pack removal would be a bit easier, they are very close to the hull.
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  13. #49
    4 Star General rustystud's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WillWagner View Post
    And, I think I might have stated somewhere that the other 60 did not have these pipes, well, it does too. Both were USMC tanks. The TMs we have are Army pubs. and do not show the piping. Without them there the pack removal would be a bit easier, they are very close to the hull.
    Like I said before, they have to do with the ability of the Tanks to land on beaches which at times means running under water for short periods of time. There should also be a "hand pump" by the gunners station which fills a rubber bladder under the turret.

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