Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 34

Thread: Fuel polishing

  1. #11
    2 Star Admiral Daybreak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Northern, Virginia
    Posts
    1,186
    Thanks
    180
    Thanked 1,456 Times in 652 Posts

    Default

    Howdy,
    The Racor filters can be had in a 2 micron, 10 micron, and 30 micron.They can be had in a short, medium, and tall length.

    30-Micron (P Rating) (Red Cap)
    10-Micron (T Rating) (Blue Cap)
    2-Micron (S Rating) (Brown Cap)
    Like below;
    short - Racor R15S, R15T, R15P
    medium - Racor R20S, R20T, R20P

    so any Racor filter ending with a S is a 2 micron filter. Racor is the pricey version, you can always buy a compatible from others too.
    there are tons of style and gph ratings out there.

    A military 24v or a similar airtex 12v fuel pump would work. It is not meant to work fast. Just flowing and polishing is what you want to accomplish. Say from one barrel to another.
    ~~Later Mike

  2. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Daybreak For This Useful Post:

    Demoh (02-02-2019), Guyfang (02-03-2019), rumplecat (02-02-2019), smokem joe (02-02-2019), Wolfen (02-04-2019)

  3. #12
    dumpsterlandingfromorbit! gimpyrobb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincy Ohio
    Posts
    27,406
    Thanks
    2,409
    Thanked 8,597 Times in 4,486 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by smokem joe View Post
    If it was just my own fuel it wouldn't be a problem. I'd be using the setup on about a dozen locations with anywhere from 50 to 100 gallons each. That's a lot of fuel to burn on a bonfire!

    What kind of filter setup are you talking about?
    Well, I have stanadyne fm100 filters that are water separating 5micron with a drain. Put one of those with a 2 or 1micron filter after it and you'd be good to go. Just need to choose a fuel pump from there. If you want to build your own, I can sell you just the filters. I have a bunch of 30micron too if the fuel needs triple filtered.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to gimpyrobb For This Useful Post:

    Guyfang (02-03-2019)

  5. #13
    General
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Southern, Maryland
    Posts
    421
    Thanks
    73
    Thanked 283 Times in 132 Posts

    Default

    This applies to diesel fuel, gasoline is a different topic. When talking about contaminates there are three biggies to worry about. Water, algae, and general dirt/ rust. Water occurs primarily from condensation, bad fuel, poor sealing caps and fittings. Once the amount of water in diesel fuel reaches 1%, algae can grow. Rust and dirt shouldn’t need an explanation.

    From the above it should come as no surprise prevention is the best course of action.

    So, what about fuel polishing. It will depend on how much fuel that needs to be dealt with, what kind of problems there may be and what does the budget allow.

    Probably one of the best filters is one from a Beta fuel setup. They remove water and are rated for 50 GPM. The design allows fuel to pass thru the filter and water collects in the bottom of the housing during use to be drained off later. The full Beta pumping rig is a little too big for most users. However, the small 24V transfer pumps work quite well, and pump 35 GPM. Using a transfer pump thru a beta filter will remove the water.

    What if the fuel has algae growing in it? A heavy treatment of algaecide will kill the algae and after it settles to the bottom of the tank the Beta filter will filter the algae from the fuel. A nice setup would be a Beta tank, transfer pump, thru a Beta filter back into the tank or another tank. 55-gallon drums or any other fuel tank would accomplish the task just as well.

    Filter.jpg
    Filter 2.jpg
    Filter 3.jpg

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Scrounger For This Useful Post:

    Guyfang (02-03-2019), NormB (02-02-2019)

  7. #14
    4 Star General Katahdin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Scarborough, ME
    Posts
    1,282
    Thanks
    334
    Thanked 842 Times in 343 Posts

    Default

    I'd rotate the stale diesel from the generators into a home heating oil tank. A typical home in the north that heats with fuel oil burns through 1000 gallons every winter.
    66' Kaiser Jeep M109A3
    67' Kaiser Jeep M275A2
    70' Jeep M35A2
    67' Atlantis Electronics Corp M105A2
    88' AMA Enterprises M101A2

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Katahdin For This Useful Post:

    Guyfang (02-03-2019), NormB (02-02-2019)

  9. #15
    Colonel
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    St Pete, FL
    Posts
    207
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 173 Times in 74 Posts

    Default

    Ive done a lot of work with diesel before getting into meps, not as much as some but a decent amount. A lot of "documents" say 1 year, 2 years, etc... for shelf life. Ive had 5 year diesel run fine, ive had pump diesel be trash. Ill share some of my experiences from both ends of the spectrum and my post might jump all over the place. (this isnt meant to be an advice post, more of a life experience post)

    From what I have learned the state on which you acquire it in and how you store it plays a big role in how long it can be kept. If you acquire it dry and store it in sealed (or pressure vented) metal drums / tanks you are normally fine.

    So ive noticed places which have really cheap fuel, its just that, really cheap fuel. Id pick up 100 gallons from a Murphy USA because its cheap, but their pumps are labeled "up to B20". I shine a light into my tank and I cannot see the bottom because its so cloudy. (not sure if that was emulsified water or the fact that it is a biodiesel blend.) If I get 100 gallons from a Hess which has a high turnover because it has a truck island and is by the interstate, it is much more consistent and always looks great.

    For storage, 55s are fine but if they are steel they are a real pain in the arse. I only take petroleum product 55s that are always 1 fill then discard; transmission, hydraulic, motor oil, etc... Drums dont have a spec of rust on the bottom. However this year when I was up doing hurricane relief I had one of those 55s and my brother filled it at work with bad diesel (they have 8000 gallons onsite and there is ALWAYS water in their fuel) and ran a generator for a few weeks from that drum. It may have been filled once past the initial fill and I took the drum back after 4 weeks. I dumped the drum into my transfer tank thinking it was a new drum and it would be fine. I was wrong and there was so much rust flakes that got into my 'used to be pristine' transfer tank I had to spend a day cleaning it out. Inspection of the drum showed a lot of rust in ONLY 4 WEEKS. Stick with aluminum or stainless steel bulk storage if at all possible. Still is fine for high volume tanks but not for storage IMHO.

    Way back when my brother was local working for a diesel shop they had a run of drivers pumping def into the diesel tank or some other bonehead move. Needless to say I acquired hundreds of gallons of diesel at the height of the prices, not something that you can just dispose of without your wallet crying due to the possible savings. It was enough diesel that if it trashed the injectors of a 7.3 I would still be ahead. Out of all the 55s ive received I was able to consolidate through siphoning and had 1 55 of 'stuff' that I rejected and the rest I was able to successfully polish.

    Now, def / urea is nasty stuff in a fuel system. It is mostly water though. Settle the water out and there isnt really anything you can do for the urea. Everything that I have done to this fuel, none of it was through a filter and all of it was chemical treatments. Emulsifiers and alcohol based additives was what I used. When the diesel splashed up on something stopped crystallizing I knew it was safe to burn. The key here is dilute it with fresh diesel and burn it as fast as you can. Well a 7.3 has HEUI injectors which dont take bad fuel well, and I am still running on that set of injectors, maybe have 75k on them after this fuel. YMMV though (pun intended), but this is a worse case scenario to show whats possible. Anything that is caustic/acidic can destroy a fuel system long term, but if you think about how to minimize the damage, this may be the difference between having fuel or not having fuel in an emergency.

    Always add something to boost the lubricity. When I was cheap it would always be a 2 stroke oil. When I wasnt it would be an actual product like the power service line.

    For the purposes for this thread and how we all have generators we have to maintain a stock of fuel for though, it pretty much boils down to what was said earlier. Water, algae, and particulate. Keep the water out and you keep the algae out (for the most part.) If you have a setup where say you have 3 drums, 2 full and 1 empty, every 6 months if you play musical drums with a polisher, and burn the oldest fuel first you will go a long way with your fuel. I run a clean tank dirty tank setup where if I have a generator I need to service Ill pull the old fuel out of a generator and that is what Ill burn in my truck. Any fuel that I inspect and looks like it could be a danger to my equipment I decide to burn through other means (heat, firestarter, etc...) New fuel goes in, and since I drive enough I never have to pay for disposal. Ill cycle fuel at home this way buy every time I feel I need to cycle a tank Ill fill the truck with it then inspect the tank then drop a load of fresh, stabilized, and biocided fuel into that drum. For those of you without a diesel vehicle, find a friend who has an older diesel that is fine with fuel that may be a little stale.

    Oh and any fuel that comes with these MEPs I never burn in an engine, a lot of it is pretty trashed. Half of my work is cleaning fuel tanks in these units. More reason to stay up on your chemicals.

    Other key points are keep your drums away from daily temperature swings (so the tank doesnt breathe which will cause moisture from condensation) and direct sunlight. Stay away from any plastic that isnt completely opaque, (no IBCs unless you want algae.)
    It's not that I have too many generators, it's that I don't have enough room.

  10. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Demoh For This Useful Post:

    frank8003 (02-04-2019), Guyfang (02-03-2019), smokem joe (02-02-2019), uniquify (02-03-2019), Zed254 (02-04-2019)

  11. #16
    Colonel
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Green OH
    Posts
    391
    Thanks
    75
    Thanked 99 Times in 69 Posts

    Default

    Lots of good info here! For my purposes I think filtering 2 or 3 times down to a 2 micron would work just fine. Portable to me is anything from carry size up to something I can move on a 2 wheel dolly. I'd be all for building my own setup. What I would do is take an extra drum along to pump polished fuel into and just trade drums. Most of what I set people up with were stainless drums so no rust issues. I have extra fuel pumps for the MEPs, but straight out running on 1/4" or 5/16" line how many gph do you think they will actually move.

    Any fuel that came in the units went on a fire. I started one unit one time with the fuel in it. Paperwork inside showed it hadn't been ran in 8 years. Unit ran, but very poorly. I learned from that and trashed any fuel from there on out. I ended up changing my brand new filters and having the injectors cleaned up in that unit because of that.

  12. #17
    Colonel
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Green OH
    Posts
    391
    Thanks
    75
    Thanked 99 Times in 69 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Katahdin View Post
    I'd rotate the stale diesel from the generators into a home heating oil tank. A typical home in the north that heats with fuel oil burns through 1000 gallons every winter.

    Not to many of those left around here. Anyone not on natural gas uses propane. I have talked to my fuel distributor about how much heating oil they sell-not much. I buy offroad fuel or I would filter it and dump it in my 5 ton. I'm not chancing getting dipped with red fuel though.

  13. #18
    General
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    525
    Thanks
    40
    Thanked 287 Times in 199 Posts

    Default

    You can build a diy fuel polisher for prety cheap useing that racor filter setup and a old gas vehicle fuel pump. The gas fuel pumps will fit in a 2in npt opening even with the pickup screen on. Hook everything up and walk away for a few hours. I keep a few of these old gas fuel pumps laying around.

    Im still in 5gal jug mode on my fuel storage. I am going through more diesel with a mini excavator now so may put into service my 30gal or 55gal drum.

  14. #19
    Colonel robson1015's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    New Concord, Ohio
    Posts
    390
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 169 Times in 98 Posts

    Default

    Although not real popular on here - I use a black plastic 55 gal drum to store fuel for my MEP-803A. ( with additives of course)

  15. #20
    Colonel
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Green OH
    Posts
    391
    Thanks
    75
    Thanked 99 Times in 69 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bmxenbrett View Post
    You can build a diy fuel polisher for prety cheap useing that racor filter setup and a old gas vehicle fuel pump. The gas fuel pumps will fit in a 2in npt opening even with the pickup screen on. Hook everything up and walk away for a few hours. I keep a few of these old gas fuel pumps laying around.

    Im still in 5gal jug mode on my fuel storage. I am going through more diesel with a mini excavator now so may put into service my 30gal or 55gal drum.
    Not sure what kind of old gas vehicle pump you are talking about. Old to me is the mechanical fuel pump on the side of the engine! I guess that shows my age. Do you have a link or a picture of one?

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •