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Thread: Emergency rescue operations M929a2 prep

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    Default Emergency rescue operations M929a2 prep

    Hello,
    i just bought a 929a2 for high water rescue operations and would like to know what I need to do to enable it to go through high floodwaters (4+ft.). I've heard of fording kits, but is there a checklist somewhere that I can go down that detail all modifications I need to do to make sure water does not get into places it should not? I need to make this one ready for the rapidly approaching hurricane season. I'm hopeful I made the right choice in purchasing a 929 as I read max water depth is 30 inches. That's not going to cut it in these Texas floods the way they've been the past few years.

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    Ummm.... about two foot of lift, and bigger tires?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Two Stroke Madness View Post
    Ummm.... about two foot of lift, and bigger tires?
    So this truck is not capable of 4-6 foot water rescues? I'm on an emergency call detail (voluntary) and travel around Central and Gulf areas during high water events.

    Nothing I can do to this truck to get through water up to the doors with the exception of a lift and bigger tires?

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    Not impossible by any means, but if this is going to be a dedicated high water rescue vehicle then I would suggest going for more of a custom built unit. I recently saw some videos on YouTube of big mud trucks rescuing some military trucks from the flood waters.... I doubt you want to be the one being rescued.
    Last edited by Two Stroke Madness; 02-04-2019 at 02:58.

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    4 plus feet would be an extreme situation and not the norm. However, I'd like to be able to get to a family in high water if needed. What does a fording kit include and what are the limitations? If I can't get into 4 feet of water occasionally, I've bought the wrong truck.

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    The 5-ton trucks I've seen with the fording kits all had air lines in place of the vent valves on the axles, transmission, and transfer case. I can't remember if it was taking pressure from the crankcase, or the air system, but it was putting positive air pressure in the drive train to help keep the water out. And you want to make sure the seals on the intake system are all air tight. 1600r20 tires would be preferred too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Two Stroke Madness View Post
    The 5-ton trucks I've seen with the fording kits all had air lines in place of the vent valves on the axles, transmission, and transfer case. I can't remember if it was taking pressure from the crankcase, or the air system, but it was putting positive air pressure in the drive train to help keep the water out. And you want to make sure the seals on the intake system are all air tight. 1600r20 tires would be preferred too.
    Thank you. I will start looking into the fording kit components. I'm surprised they didn't include fording kits as standard equipment on these.

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    Oh and you're also going to need to make sure your front axle boots are the solid ones and not the zipper type. After you come out of the water you need to drain out any residual water that may have made it into the drive train, and also clean and repack all the wheel bearings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Two Stroke Madness View Post
    Oh and you're also going to need to make sure your front axle boots are the solid ones and not the zipper type. After you come out of the water you need to drain out any residual water that may have made it into the drive train, and also clean and repack all the wheel bearings.
    Appreciate the additional info.

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    You did not make the right choice. If you want to help in the hurricane affected zone along the coast, you need a flat bottom boat. During Harvey, every rescue we did, our high water military trucks could not get to the houses, but boats could. The trucks ended up being ineffective transfer vehicles from dry land to shelters.

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