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Thread: M8 Greyhound help

  1. #21
    Moderator WillWagner's Avatar
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    M3 and M8 are the same but different. W/P, head, probably the rods, crank, gear train will probably swap. The block is different, but the same, there is a casting on the w/p side that, on the M8, is machined out for the oil filler/crankcase vent. Carb, exhaust are unique to the M8 as is the oil pan and lube pump. Brent Mullinshas a good supply of parts for the Greyhound.

    No vid yet, but yesterday it moved out of it's spot in the shop, almost had to call a tree surgeon to cut the roots off that it grew because it sat there for so long! I moved it over two spots to make room for a Deuce. The brakes and clutch only needed bleeding, so they were flushed and work good. The engine in this came out of a search light generator, the oil filler is not machined into the block casting, the boss is there, but no holes, so the oil filling location is where the plug in the oil pan is to adjust the lube pump output. It was a cuhnk of 3/4 PVC pipe with duct tape over it. It came up between the coil and oil filter. I made a filler from a SB chevy oil filler, the old type that presses into the front of the intake manifold. Indexed the elbow in the pan so it was angled at apx 45 degrees up, installed a 45 elbow and made a piece pipe welded to the oil filler tube. Now there is crankcase ventilation and a hole larger than 3/4 to add/fill the oil.
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    Moderator WillWagner's Avatar
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    never mind...
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    I am a little late but I will have a couple of things that I do on any carburetor rebuild, especially cast iron.

    I will use talc powder on the gaskets to keep them from sticking. Sometimes it will take a few cleaning sessions to get all bleeds clear of foreign matter. And a little rust or dirt in the idle air bleeds will drive you nuts. I will in cases of gaskets getting hard to locate, I will take new or used gaskets and print, trace them on a sheet of paper or gasket material for a later time. Gasket material is cheep and having a replacement gasket when you need it or can not locate can be frustrating. I know that one day I will HAVE to take the cast carb apart again, no doubt. I have yet to find an additive that will help with ethanol fuel, and my best is Murphy's.

    Cast iron carburetors have a bad problem with ethanol in the gasoline. Rust forms almost immediately in the bowls and air and gas passages. If possible using gasoline without ethanol is preferred by me reducing that problem. I also run carburetor out of fuel more for the fuel and air passages to stay clear. If I can not locate regular fuel then race gasoline it is.

    And I use a lead additive on any machine that is sitting more than being used. The reason is that stuck valves and bent pushrods can spoil a great leisurely day planned. It is very unfortunate that the new fuels have more negative impact on older equipment than helping.

    I guess that I am just an og that likes simple or complex mechanical engineering. And to learn about the circuit controlled world, computer dominated is a big learning curve for me.

    Please keep us in the Drag on the continued progress.
    Last edited by cucvmule; 09-28-2019 at 20:53.
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    I indeed made traces of the original gaskets for future use. Hopefully, we will not need them! The fuel pump is now wired so that it can be turned off so the engine can run itself out of fuel. We have talked about using AV gas for these older vehicles, but I am worried that the high octane and low lead,100LL here, will do bad things to the engine. We have talked about Stabil as well as a lead substitute.
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    I have this discussion with my brother about fuel regulators and electric pumps. I use 5 to 7 pounds for a reference on gasoline as most carburetors require for under load fuel consumption. But to much will possibly overload needle and seat raising fuel bowl level and if sticking needle, flood gas into engine compartment, as a mechanical pump can also but only when running.

    Not harping here, just want to throw out the what if.
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    Default Flatbed scanner to copy gaskets

    Hi

    I have had very good luck using a flatbed scanner to make and store gaskets for my MVs. Couple of tricks/tips from doing this over the last 15 or so years.


    1. Of course you are limited to the size of your scanner and printer.
    2. Set the resolution of the scanner way up, at low resolution it tends to make ovals out of circles.
    3. Do a scale test lay a pair of flat rulers, one length wise other then print out with printer set at 1to1 or 100% and check the print out with same rulers.
    4. Inexpensive printers particular those that have pass through paper handling work fine or large office printers with a heavy stock feed.
    5. I have used manila card stock with good success for many gaskets
    6. I've copied new gaskets, or gaskets like axle end gaskets made or drawn by hand once you have a good gasket image you can put several of them on a single sheet of gasket material.
    7. When no gasket to work from putting the parts directly on the scanner, for lite parts it works fine, no I haven't broken a scanner yet.


    Now to cutting gaskets particularly holes, over the years I've collected a lot of different size tubing. You can use them as punches but chucking them up in the drill press, sharpening with a file while spinning, then with a piece of wood on the deck turn up the speed and with a lite preasure cut your hole in the printed gasket sheets.

    Types of gasket that have worked well, axle hub, transmission and transfer case bearings caps, carburetors, vacuum wiper, transmission covers.


    Cheers Phil

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