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Thread: M809 Series- Front axle work and what to expect

  1. #41
    Corporal TheQuaker's Avatar
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    Ajax
    I'll give my thumbs up as well for the torque multipliers.
    I picked up a "not so expensive" one from Amazon in preparation even before I got my 923.
    After having all 10 wheels off at least once (a couple more than once already to replace axle seals unfortunately) I believe these things are God's gift to MV owners. Unbelievably effortless to use and so simple and effective.
    I also recommend always having a couple appropriate spare lug nuts and studs (RH & LH) on hand before starting anything requiring removing the wheels. I found several lugs and studs on mine that were damaged, cross-threaded, stripped, etc. and needed immediate replacement and many more that had seen much better days and will need to be replaced eventually.
    Nothing more frustrating than trying to get your truck back together and on the road after dealing with a failed seal or something and not having a simple spare stud/nut to complete the job, especially as I do most work on my truck on the weekends when the local truck parts shops are not open.71QQdPNyLZL._SX679_.jpg

    Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk

  2. #42
    General Ajax MD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheQuaker View Post
    Ajax
    I'll give my thumbs up as well for the torque multipliers.
    I picked up a "not so expensive" one from Amazon in preparation even before I got my 923.
    After having all 10 wheels off at least once (a couple more than once already to replace axle seals unfortunately) I believe these things are God's gift to MV owners. Unbelievably effortless to use and so simple and effective.
    I also recommend always having a couple appropriate spare lug nuts and studs (RH & LH) on hand before starting anything requiring removing the wheels. I found several lugs and studs on mine that were damaged, cross-threaded, stripped, etc. and needed immediate replacement and many more that had seen much better days and will need to be replaced eventually.
    Nothing more frustrating than trying to get your truck back together and on the road after dealing with a failed seal or something and not having a simple spare stud/nut to complete the job, especially as I do most work on my truck on the weekends when the local truck parts shops are not open.71QQdPNyLZL._SX679_.jpg

    Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk
    Good point, I should have had some spare studs and nuts on hand. Fortunately, everything had gone smoothly and without damage...up to the point of this one, stuck nut.
    Thanks for the product endorsement, it makes me feel confident that I'll have that nut removed by this afternoon.

    It's Veteran's Day weekend! I'm hoping to finish up the driver's side Saturday or Sunday, put some American flags on the front fenders and go for a little drive on Monday!
    Motorpool:

    (Isn't owning one of this insanity enough??)
    1971 M813 "Ox" (named for Dewey Oxburger)

  3. #43
    General Ajax MD's Avatar
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    Well, the new tool broke the final lug nut free in seconds. I did crank on it a few times and had a moment of concern as the tension built up but it let loose with a good bang and puff of rusty dust.
    I did check beforehand, and it's the proper stud. No infiltrators.

    The tool is definitely NOT USA-made. I'd like to punch Amazon right in the baby-maker for allowing a big US flag on the description page of that product. The manual was written in pigeon-English.

    I'm all pre-staged to tear into the axle tomorrow. I'll try to take different photos this time.
    Motorpool:

    (Isn't owning one of this insanity enough??)
    1971 M813 "Ox" (named for Dewey Oxburger)

  4. #44
    Colonel
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    I got the same one for my birthday back in August, and it has been very useful, both on the trucks AND on the farm equipment. I had to get a second one to keep on the 5 ton, since the first one is always being used.

  5. #45
    In memorial Ron - 73M819 Robo McDuff's Avatar
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    Default Front hub removal M51 A2

    I will do a detailed write up later, but here some pics that might help


    IMG_7437_resize.JPG IMG_7441_resize.jpg IMG_7439c_resize.jpg
    The hub with cap, ready to be taken down. Middle how it looks after you take the grease away, right, the cap full of grease but nothing else. Looks promising.

    Then ...

    Our equipment does not fit the bolt keeping the axle: you would need a key 4.3" wide, the biggest we have is 4.
    Well, working in a blacksmith workshop does pays off.

    IMG_7454_resize.jpg

    Now we know it works we will make the new tool nice and smooth and paint it before tackling the other hubs.

    IMG_7458_resize.jpgIMG_7461_resize.jpg

    Loosening the next center plate and the next final nut. Big surprise: we did not need to make a next tool, the nut was hand-tight.

    IMG_7462_resize.jpg

    With some strap cords as help, soldier A and B managed to get the hub off without braking our backs.

    Biggest surprise: apart from some recent rust on the inside of the hub, everything looks ok and dry. Only a bit of oil, about a spoon full, in the axle chamber, nothing in the hub itself. Grease looks like grease, oil like oil, no water.

    First glance at the brake cylinder seals: looks good also.

    Given the fact that probably those brake hubs had not been removed for at least a decade, probably more, that is not bad.

    Only thing I saw is that the inside seal has a nick out of it. Might be result of standing in one position for years and then having the hub removed.


    IMG_7466_resize.JPG
    M51A2 - M52A2 dual purpose truck, waiting for a double brake circuit conversion

    The Soca / Izonso Front, also known as the the Forgotten Front of WW1


    Czech Emigration Museum - Cold War, US Army Engineers in Europe exhibition in preparation



    Our historic blacksmith workshop in Nove Hrady, Czech Republic



  6. #46
    General Ajax MD's Avatar
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    Finished up the driver's side yesterday.

    The driver's side was in even better condition. The grease was still in solid form and plenty of it. Frankly, the only reason I cleaned and re-greased everything was just to get it all on the same maintenance schedule. No axle tube leaks, no corrosion, no brake leaks. The bearings and races are not "like new" but only show a slight amount of normal wear. For some reason, the boot was more difficult this time with a lot of slipping and wrestling but I got it.

    I'm posting a couple photos to expand on Wes' video where he uses a pry bar and hammer to lift out the old seal. I just want to show exactly what and where you're hooking the prybar on:

    In the first photo, I'm hooked beneath the bearing, hung up on a metal lip inside the hub (not the race). I thought this was correct because I was worried about the bar touching the bearing and damaging it. This is WRONG. Do not do this.

    In the second photo, I've slipped the bar in betwixt the lip of the seal and the bearing. To my eye, this looks like I might damage the bearing but it falls into the hub, out of contact. To protect the opposite side of the lip of the seal, I've built up a little cribbage for a safe prying point. This let me remove the seal without damaging it.

    The third photo is just to illustrate that the seal is now removed.

    I did replace my seals, but the old seal was in perfect condition so I cleaned and bagged it to keep as an "emergency spare" in my collection of parts.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Motorpool:

    (Isn't owning one of this insanity enough??)
    1971 M813 "Ox" (named for Dewey Oxburger)

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  8. #47
    General Ajax MD's Avatar
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    Blah, blah blah. More photos. This thread is mainly to help folks with the older 5 tons and clear up some differences between TM's and Youtube.

    I saw a guy pull a front drum on Youtube and his inner seal and bearing remained on the spindle when he pulled the drum. This was on a 939 series truck and confused me. I don't know what's normal for a 939, but as demonstrated here, that stuff is supposed to be captive in the brake drum/hub when you pull it.

    All of my brake components were labled "OK" so they must be OK, right?
    I've noticed that certain places on my truck seem to show good, fresh maintenance and other areas seem totally missed. My truck's very last assignment was RTS-M, Fort Dix, NJANG. It makes me wonder if it served as a student training truck for mechanics?

    Also, a photo of how NOT to try to free a stuck lug nut. This might have been an acceptable risk back in the day, but with these new, compact, torque multiplying lug wrenches shown in this thread, there is ZERO reason to risk your tools, your truck or your physical safety this way. I can't believe I actually tried this. I'm glad I stopped.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Motorpool:

    (Isn't owning one of this insanity enough??)
    1971 M813 "Ox" (named for Dewey Oxburger)

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