Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8 9 10
Results 91 to 95 of 95

Thread: Attention!! Please use caution when driving vehicles home from auction!

  1. #91
    General TehTDK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    549
    Thanks
    86
    Thanked 164 Times in 92 Posts

    Default

    Anyone who buys a MV and doesn't give it a thorough inspection AND knows the vehicle is just asking for serious trouble. But sadly the thorough inspection practice doesn't just relate to retired MVs etc....


    Being active in the national guard I happen to come across a lot of active MV vehicles, and until recently I actually expected my fellow soldiers to keep on top of PMCS and report any issues with the vehicles in question. I picked up a Mercedes GD Jeep and went through the inspection along with 2 other soldiers as a part of our military driving qualification. The vehicle was a National Guards vehicle, but when we were done with our inspection we had 4 full pages of faults, errors and items that needed looked at and fixed. Suffice to say I was surprised... and not in a good way.


    Only goes to show that nothing can really replace a personal overlook and inspection when picking up any vehicle retired or active to make sure its safe and up to scratch. The vehicle in question had no serious defects, but some that could potentially become serious if not looked at.


    So again, nothing can replace a personal inspection, that way at least, you can be sure that the vehicle is up to a standard you at least can agree with before driving off. And if its not, then better to leave it where it is and order shipping.


    As a fellow soldier said to me; "When in doubt.... do not proceed"

  2. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to TehTDK For This Useful Post:

    Cycletek (04-07-2013), Jesse6325 (04-16-2013)

  3. #92
    Colonel iatractor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    SE Iowa
    Posts
    225
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 119 Times in 65 Posts

    Default

    Back when I bought my deuce, I downloaded many tech manuals, read different websites (including one that a ss member has describing the ins and outs of owning deuce), talked to what few owners I could find around me, and did a fair amount to homework before purchasing. Thought about going through GL to save a few bucks, but after finding a dealer in this part of the state, decided it was worth it to purchase from him. Put many miles driving there, test driving trucks, going through an informal class with the guy showing me the things to look for, potential problems and maintenance items. One thing I did everytime I left his place was map a route home. Different than the one I took to get there which was mostly all 4 lane highway. Decided taking the two lane route home was more conducive if a problem would happen driving home, plus I would rather have to pay to park the truck on a farmer's barn lot than to get towed off a major thoroughfare. Mentally I had a map of potential blind curves, narrow points, and spots to pull off if needed for oncoming farm traffic. Plus the remaining 50 miles were routes I knew by heart from the days of running fuel and propane trucks in the area. Since the truck I bought had over 600 miles put on it after purchasing from GL the previous fall, and had a full service done in front of my eyes, I knew the 100 mile trip should be uneventful. Used my pickup as a chase vehicle so my entire roll away tool box was in it, chains, binders, come alongs, tech manuals, 3/4 and 1 inch socket sets, and you name it were loaded up. The dealer had two 5 ton wreckers and said he would be on standby for my trip home, and a friend of mine had his drop deck waiting-along with my route map. (He knew the route by heart so telling him to stop at the old brick barn on highway 22 wouldn't have been an issue.) Took along my handheld Motorola to stay in contact with the pickup mobile. For the first 20 miles I had him follow behind looking for any fluid leaks along the road that may not show up while idling at a check point. In the first 30 miles I would get out and check things over every 5-8 miles just to make sure nothing was showing signs of failure. Biggest issue was that one of the highways that I ran was very narrow and farming season was in full swing. Had to pull off a couple of time so the passing tractor had room to get around me, and the tourists lined up behind me. But having a wrecker on standby and a drop deck, was kind of peace of mind. Made it home with no problems or incidents. Just hot since the front window was stuck shut. Key things to take away, have tools for any emergency, have people know your route, have back up plan in place, and know your route and escapes if needed.
    Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to iatractor For This Useful Post:

    USAFSS-ColdWarrior (09-29-2013)

  5. #93
    Sergeant Major drician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Graham, WA
    Posts
    143
    Thanks
    113
    Thanked 55 Times in 39 Posts

    Default

    I just have to say thank you to everyone who has posted in this thread. When I had my first recovery this year in May, I had insurance and temporary plates for both trucks. My uncle drove his truck as a chase/mobile repair vehicle full of any and all tools, fluids, and chains we hopefully wouldn't/didn't have to use. Finally, a fellow SS member met us there as an extra set of eyes to make sure we hadn't missed anything on our pre-trip inspection. It pays to take things slow and do them right the first time.
    1982 M923 "Ironheade" (With an E so they know we mean business.)
    1982 M923 "Big R"
    1985 M931A1 (No name yet)
    1991 M105A1
    1991 M105A1
    19?? M871

    "What could possibly go wrong?"

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to drician For This Useful Post:

    USAFSS-ColdWarrior (09-29-2013)

  7. #94
    Chaplain USAFSS-ColdWarrior's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    San Angelo, Tom Green County, Texas USA
    Posts
    16,817
    Thanks
    60,114
    Thanked 22,266 Times in 7,690 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by drician View Post
    I just have to say thank you to everyone who has posted in this thread. When I had my first recovery this year in May, I had insurance and temporary plates for both trucks. My uncle drove his truck as a chase/mobile repair vehicle full of any and all tools, fluids, and chains we hopefully wouldn't/didn't have to use. Finally, a fellow SS member met us there as an extra set of eyes to make sure we hadn't missed anything on our pre-trip inspection. It pays to take things slow and do them right the first time.
    You didn't mention what type vehicle you recovered, but I'm guessing it was the M923 mentioned in your signature line. Cool deal! Congrats on your recovery!

  8. #95
    Sergeant Major drician's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Graham, WA
    Posts
    143
    Thanks
    113
    Thanked 55 Times in 39 Posts

    Default

    Sorry about that, yes they were both M923s.
    1982 M923 "Ironheade" (With an E so they know we mean business.)
    1982 M923 "Big R"
    1985 M931A1 (No name yet)
    1991 M105A1
    1991 M105A1
    19?? M871

    "What could possibly go wrong?"

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to drician For This Useful Post:

    USAFSS-ColdWarrior (09-30-2013)

Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 6 7 8 9 10

Similar Threads

  1. Looking for a deuce tractor
    By Crash_AF in forum The Deuce
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 02-16-2008, 22:43
  2. M818 GVWR
    By Armada in forum 5-ton and up
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-13-2008, 22:12
  3. Should I drive a deuce home from the auction?
    By KaiserM109 in forum The Deuce
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 08-12-2007, 20:04
  4. Driving it home
    By Manstein in forum The Deuce
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-01-2006, 02:18

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •