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Thread: 12V illum. switch on 24V system?

  1. #21
    4 Star General /Moderator doghead's Avatar
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    Post #2 suggested that.
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    4 Star General tim292stro's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodsplinter View Post
    Tim292stro- I took a switch apart but no resistor inside. Once I have the correct resistor, how do I wire it in? The terminals on the switches are labeled "power", "acc", "ground".
    For future reference if you have this type of LED toggle switch:
    led_toggle_switch.jpg
    the resistor is in the lever with the LED.

    If you have this type:
    12v_illuminated_switch.jpg
    the LED and resistor is in the base.

    If you want to avoid resistors with LEDs in a toggle completely, you can make an LED illuminated toggle into a "multi-volt" switch (5-30V) by using a current limiting diode. This is a small self-contained regulator that will only allow the specified current through - it does this by adjusting its equivalent DC resistance.
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  5. #23
    2 Star General Woodsplinter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doghead View Post
    Post #2 suggested that.
    I was just trying to avoid that- but it was helpful to have someone show me exactly how to wire it- even though it's very simple to do. Like they say "simple things fascinate simple minds", and this has been just fascinating.
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    4 Star General ke5eua's Avatar
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    Ohm's Law

    V(E)=I/R

    Desired Voltage (Energy)= 12v
    Resistance used = 1000

    That means the current draw of the light would is 12mA or 0.012A. That sound like an led light to me, which means it most liekly would have worked on 24v to start with

    All you had to do was provide the current draw or the model of the switch you were using and anyone of us would have provided you with the correct answer with a crayola drawing, lol

    Ohm_39_s_Law_Pie_chart.jpg
    Last edited by ke5eua; 12-07-2014 at 20:14.
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    2 Star General Woodsplinter's Avatar
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    Thanks Mike! I didn't know the current draw until I went back to the store and decided to try the 12V route again. I tried the same switch before with some led work lights that only pulled 2 amps total. The light burned out in about two months but the switch continued working.

    I was really hoping to find 24V switches and avoid using resistors altogether.
    ​​1983 AM General M35A2C

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    4 Star General ke5eua's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodsplinter View Post
    Thanks Mike! I didn't know the current draw until I went back to the store and decided to try the 12V route again. I tried the same switch before with some led work lights that only pulled 2 amps total. The light burned out in about two months but the switch continued working.

    I was really hoping to find 24V switches and avoid using resistors altogether.
    Ahh, yeah having the specs on the switches helps when determining current draw and voltage range.

    It's no biggie, glad you got it all sorted out.
    Michael D. H.
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    This switches light is only rated for 14 volts so it can't be hooked directly to a 24v system. I think the company you linking to is good as they are giving me a refund because of that
    Quote Originally Posted by Warthog View Post
    www.mcmastercar.com

    http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-to...itches/=uu3gd9

    Item 7343K93 shows to be rated for 15a at 28V DC.

    Available in red or green.

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