Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38

Thread: Electrical soldering/connections basics.

  1. #11
    4 Star General Guyfang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Burgkunstadt, Germany
    Posts
    6,299
    Thanks
    12,326
    Thanked 5,662 Times in 2,713 Posts

    Default

    The only thing wrong with a soldered wire is that if you ever have the wire get HOT, like a short circuit, or an over loaded circuit, it can melt the solder and come apart. That's the reason you don't solder wires in a house installation. An overloaded circuit makes heat. You have all seen wires on trucks and generators that have a burnt up wire harness. Well, if it's hot enough to smoke a harness, it's hot enough to melt a solder joint. A butt connector is a much better way to fix a broken/cut wire. The butt connector pictures illustrated here are a perfect butt connector joint. And the advice on using the right crimping tool is 100% right. I saw a generator wire harness burn up because one of my people used a crimper tool for an uninsulated ring terminal, on an insulated terminal. The crimper tool punched a hole in the insolation on the terminal, causing it to fall off, and it shorted out during a load test.

  2. #12
    4 Star General gottaluvit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Bethesda, OH (AKA: Flyover Country)
    Posts
    1,750
    Thanks
    2,955
    Thanked 1,323 Times in 680 Posts

    Default

    I just made slave cables with 2/0 wire and crimped the ring ends on first and then soldered. I feel "keeping" the good connection will prevent the heat in the first place. Of course with that heavy of a wire I had to use a torch to get it hot enough to make the solder sweat in. I also always scrape both the wire and the terminals to very shiny metal before I start.
    Karma: A blessing or a curse? The choice is ours!


    1990 M929A2 : BMY
    1985 M1008A1 : Chevrolet
    1989 M998 4 Man: A.M. General
    1989 M998 2 Man: A.M. General
    1966 M332 : Johnson Furnace (For Sale)
    19?? M101A1 : Case Master
    19?? M101A2 : AMA Enterprises
    2011 M1061A1 : TACOM (Traded)
    2008 M1082 : BAE Systems
    2001 M1082 : Stewart & Stevenson
    1998 M1101 : Silver Eagle
    2 ea. 1997 M1102 : Silver Eagle
    4 ea. M105A2 : Various Makes/Years
    2000 MEP-803A Genset : Fermont (LEAD reset 09/2014; acquired with 2 hrs)
    1993 MEP-803A Trailer Mounted Power Plant :
    Libby (LEAD reset 10/2013; acquired with 2 hrs)

  3. #13
    Sergeant
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ocala fl
    Posts
    78
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 51 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    Thanks for the input I will not argue your point because you are right but I will add that if the solder melts the connection may break and prevent further damage.

    The truth is I always use connectors but some people live in the past and think solder is the only way.

  4. #14
    4 Star General Guyfang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Burgkunstadt, Germany
    Posts
    6,299
    Thanks
    12,326
    Thanked 5,662 Times in 2,713 Posts

    Default

    There is a time and place for solder. I still have my soldering iron that I bought 30+ years ago. It still get used a bunch. When a circuit is low volt/amperage, then I don't think twice. Or when I have problems with a circuit card/board. Re-solder every connection, and often it is as good as new.

  5. #15
    Sergeant
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ocala fl
    Posts
    78
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 51 Times in 20 Posts

    Default

    Like you said in your previous post solder is not particularly the proper repair for household voltage but this is a automotive forum. In the low voltage stuff we will be working on there is nothing wrong with using solder as a repair. I would recommend that people use what they are comfortable with or what they have readily available. If I run out of solder there is no shame in using a butt connector to finish the job or vice versa. But the reality is this thread was intended to inform people that did not know how to solder and not to debate the proper time and place to use it.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to V8srfun For This Useful Post:

    rumplecat (02-11-2016)

  7. #16
    General The HUlk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Cincy, OH
    Posts
    468
    Thanks
    114
    Thanked 234 Times in 144 Posts

    Default

    Generally speaking, if any wiring or connection gets hot enough to melt solder that would be indicative of incorrect conductor guage or contact area size for the required ampacity as well as no circuit breaker protection being used. Both are bad ideas for the most part.
    I'm a firm believer of old laws, especially the one on gravity.
    -swbradley1





  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to The HUlk For This Useful Post:

    daytonatrbo (02-11-2016), rumplecat (02-11-2016)

  9. #17
    4 Star General gottaluvit's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Bethesda, OH (AKA: Flyover Country)
    Posts
    1,750
    Thanks
    2,955
    Thanked 1,323 Times in 680 Posts

    Default

    I would "think" the insulation would catch fire before a good solder joint could melt. Just my 1 3/4 cents.
    Karma: A blessing or a curse? The choice is ours!


    1990 M929A2 : BMY
    1985 M1008A1 : Chevrolet
    1989 M998 4 Man: A.M. General
    1989 M998 2 Man: A.M. General
    1966 M332 : Johnson Furnace (For Sale)
    19?? M101A1 : Case Master
    19?? M101A2 : AMA Enterprises
    2011 M1061A1 : TACOM (Traded)
    2008 M1082 : BAE Systems
    2001 M1082 : Stewart & Stevenson
    1998 M1101 : Silver Eagle
    2 ea. 1997 M1102 : Silver Eagle
    4 ea. M105A2 : Various Makes/Years
    2000 MEP-803A Genset : Fermont (LEAD reset 09/2014; acquired with 2 hrs)
    1993 MEP-803A Trailer Mounted Power Plant :
    Libby (LEAD reset 10/2013; acquired with 2 hrs)

  10. #18
    4 Star General Steel Soldiers Vendor Suprman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Stratford/Connecticut
    Posts
    6,595
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 2,333 Times in 1,540 Posts

    Default

    I like the crimp then solder and heat shrink over for the best possible long lasting connection. I have seen alot of military-done crimp connections corrode over years of service and go bad. Something solder along with the original crimp would have prevented.

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Suprman For This Useful Post:

    gottaluvit (02-11-2016)

  12. #19
    Colonel daytonatrbo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Tricities, TN
    Posts
    320
    Thanks
    206
    Thanked 128 Times in 86 Posts

    Default

    One thing I would add to this, or maybe I shouldn't since it may confuse a first timer... but:

    Always tin your soldering iron. Basically, clean the tip of your iron, then apply a small amount of solder to the tip. Not enough to make a blob, just enough to smoothly cover the tip.

    This will allow MUCH better heat transfer into the wire. You will be able to heat the wire more quickly and finish more quickly, which means less damage to the nearby insulation.


    Sometimes I find myself soldering a wire that is maybe just too big for the effective heat range of one of my smaller irons. In that case I will use more "tin" on the tip to get more heat into the wire. But you really have to inspect the work afterwards to make sure it didn't come out cold. It's also something that becomes easier to judge with experience.

  13. #20
    General Hard Head's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Greenville SC
    Posts
    531
    Thanks
    80
    Thanked 388 Times in 203 Posts

    Default

    I worked in an electronics shop for 2 years. I probably desoldered (which can be harder technique to learn than soldering) and soldered tens of thousands of circuit board connections. Multi layer boards require very good soldering equipment and solder. Clean your soldering iron and desoldering tip frequently and tin them like mentioned in the preceding post! Another very good point is conductor size. Many high temp wire insulators such as those use by the military might not show over heating like you are use to seeing with standard automotive wire. If for some reason I touch a conductor before crimping, I clean it before I crimp it. I see a lot of people twisting wire with their fingers before crimping (that may lead to corrosion). Tin conductors before soldering. Use additional flux especially on large areas. Flux (Rosin type in our case) melts of at a lower temp than solder insuring that it does it's job before the solder takes hold thus helping to make a proper joint or bond. Buy a very good temperature adjustable soldering station. They are not expensive and are well worth the money. Get rid of that 9.99 soldering iron!
    Last edited by Hard Head; 02-11-2016 at 10:17.

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to Hard Head For This Useful Post:

    daytonatrbo (02-11-2016)

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •