CUCVRUS Repair Projects

ezgn

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
718
93
Location
Lake Elsinore Ca.
Anyone has any tips on bleeding the trailer surge brakes? I will be learning tomorrow, I guess.
I think you would like to hear from someone with actual experience doing this procedure. I'm also sure you know you could google it on the internet. So for what it's worth, etrailer.com has a good video and detailed information on the process. As a well-known member on this site would say, you got this, you can do it. Keep up the good work, and thanks for all your efforts.
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
I was up bright and early this AM. I hammered the jack wheel straight and that was a noisy job to be doing in the basement while my Wife was on the second-floor sleeping. I heard no one moving afterwards so I assume all is well. That wheel had the entire weight of the trailer dropped on it. DSCF8255.JPG It looks good to me now. Nothing an 8-pound hammer and an anvil could not fix. I just built a stack of steel plates and a few sockets to keep things aligned. And BAM a few times it was semi straight. The wheel goes around, and the pivot point works again. Greased and oiled everything with real grease and oil. No spray lubes that last 10 minutes. DSCF8279.JPG DSCF8280.JPG I even added a coat of Flat Black paint. From there I went, and bench bled the master cylinder. This isn't rocket science. I used standard tools and parts I have setting here and it worked out. DSCF8281.JPG It is currently 15* and I don't get much in willing helpers to get this done. It's too cold is the answer I get back. I guess the mighty vac will be my only helper. I will throw a moving blanket on the ice cap and have at it. Full report when the mission is completed. Be Safe and pace yourself. Small steps forward are progress. Sitting around is regression. No regression here.
 

Squibbly

Well-known member
329
838
93
Location
South Carolina
It is currently 15* and I don't get much in willing helpers to get this done. It's too cold is the answer I get back. I guess the mighty vac will be my only helper. I will throw a moving blanket on the ice cap and have at it. Full report when the mission is completed. Be Safe and pace yourself. Small steps forward are progress. Sitting around is regression. No regression here.
If I lived near you I’d be over there helping out. Never lose an opportunity to learn from a person with your experience, or earn a favor.
“It’s too cold” are words that should never come out of a man’s mouth. That’s what long underwear, layers and torpedo heaters are for.

When I first moved to the south after getting out of the military I still had the mindset of “I don’t know how to do that thing, so let me hire someone who does that thing because if I try it I’ll probably mess it up”.

I had a neighbor who I always saw working on cars in his driveway, or putting a new window in his house, or just doing stuff that I thought to myself “That guy must have gone to a lot of trade schools to know how to do all this stuff”.

I needed new brakes at one point, and I went over to ask him how I could find out what I really needed the mechanic to do so I didn’t get ripped off.

He looked at me like I had three heads, and questioned why I would pay so much to do an easy job. He then told me to bring my car over, went with me to the AP store to get what I needed, and walked me through doing the job myself by pointing and explaining everything and having me do the whole job myself. The sense of pride I had knowing I did that job myself was worth more than he will probably ever know.

Over the next many years we became great friends. He was not trained in any of the skills he had. He learned them because he grew up poor in WV, and you did things yourself out of necessity. He was an exterminator by trade, but I swear was Mensa smart like I had never witnessed before. The guy knew how to do everything, and what he didn’t know he just figured out with logic.

All of the cars I had seen him working on were from widows, single moms, and other needy people at his church, and he did the work for free, and only occasionally charged for parts of the person could swing it. I was constantly at his side learning and mostly slowing him down at first asking questions, but over time we were able to knock out jobs quickly, while tipping back a few frosty brews, and discussing life.

During this time I had picked up a beautiful old perfect condition 1982 Toyota pickup, that with my new minimal skills and tools I loved working on and tinkering with. Best truck I ever owned. Sipped gas. Manual transmission. No rust. Perfect paint and interior. He used to comment how nice that truck was and what a find it was.

At some point he decided to head back to WV to take a position as a coal miner because the extermination business wasn’t paying the bills like he needed.

While talking to him one day when he came to finish up the sale of his home, he told me he was struggling because the pickup he had was on its last leg and he might not be able to make it to the mines. The body was mostly rust, there were holes all over and it wouldn’t pass inspection.
I handed him the keys to my prized possession, my Toyota pickup. Free of charge. I couldn’t believe I did it either, but it seemed right after everything I had seen him do over the years for other people. He drove the mess out of that thing for many years, until he worked his way to mine supervisor and was able to get a nice new vehicle, and move his family into a nice new home.

When I saw the truck again, he had hit 3 or 4 deer with it (they are everywhere in those mountains), the body was done (there is no way around it when you have to travel to the mines), but it still ran like a champ, and had gotten him where he needed to go in life. Well worth it to me.

The morale of the story is helping someone out one day, may save your bacon some day in the future.

Good luck, Rick. I know you’ll get it done. You seem like the type.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
I came back in for lunch. I have installed the master cylinder and the breakaway lever. I never imagined the simplicity of the breakaway lever. I was semi worried that I did not have all the pieces for the lever and the TM picture looked so basic I could not see how it worked. It went back together in 10 minutes. I hooked up my mighty vacuum and applied 20 lbs of vacuum. It quickly sucked out yellow DOT 5 fluid. The DOT 5 I have is purple. So, after an hour of vacuum I started getting purple fluid back in the collection container. I am still pulling a lot of air, but the purple fluid is coming out faster now. I guess I can draw pure fluid. It holds 20 lbs of vacuum so I am sure it is doing the job. The master cylinder went down a small bit. But if you saw the pin hole on the output side of the master cylinder you would know you were in for a long ride. I sold the HMMWV tires and wheels I don't need them for anything. They were brand new but dated 12/08. I don't think they had 10 miles on them. My Son towed it 8 so maybe they had 10 miles on them. I have 3 CUCV 16" wheels I am sending to the blaster and get painted. After the brakes are bled, I have to find a place for a license plate light. Just for vehicle inspection and titling purposes. I have almost everything ready to go. Still need tires. Small 16" truck tires. I am looking for some 195/75R16 or something with a low profile. Keep my Rock Crusher at a useable height. Old man doesn't need to pick rocks over his head. More later, I am going back out to the ice cap to work. Why? Because I can and that is what I do. Take Care. Pictures and a full report later.
 

ezgn

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
718
93
Location
Lake Elsinore Ca.
If I lived near you I’d be over there helping out. Never lose an opportunity to learn from a person with your experience, or earn a favor.
“It’s too cold” are words that should never come out of a man’s mouth. That’s what long underwear, layers and torpedo heaters are for.

When I first moved to the south after getting out of the military I still had the mindset of “I don’t know how to do that thing, so let me hire someone who does that thing because if I try it I’ll probably mess it up”.

I had a neighbor who I always saw working on cars in his driveway, or putting a new window in his house, or just doing stuff that I thought to myself “That guy must have gone to a lot of trade schools to know how to do all this stuff”.

I needed new brakes at one point, and I went over to ask him how I could find out what I really needed the mechanic to do so I didn’t get ripped off.

He looked at me like I had three heads, and questioned why I would pay so much to do an easy job. He then told me to bring my car over, went with me to the AP store to get what I needed, and walked me through doing the job myself by pointing and explaining everything and having me do the whole job myself. The sense of pride I had knowing I did that job myself was worth more than he will probably ever know.

Over the next many years we became great friends. He was not trained in any of the skills he had. He learned them because he grew up poor in WV, and you did things yourself out of necessity. He was an exterminator by trade, but I swear was Mensa smart like I had never witnessed before. The guy knew how to do everything, and what he didn’t know he just figured out with logic.

All of the cars I had seen him working on were from widows, single moms, and other needy people at his church, and he did the work for free, and only occasionally charged for parts of the person could swing it. I was constantly at his side learning and mostly slowing him down at first asking questions, but over time we were able to knock out jobs quickly, while tipping back a few frosty brews, and discussing life.

During this time I had picked up a beautiful old perfect condition 1982 Toyota pickup, that with my new minimal skills and tools I loved working on and tinkering with. Best truck I ever owned. Sipped gas. Manual transmission. No rust. Perfect paint and interior. He used to comment how nice that truck was and what a find it was.

At some point he decided to head back to WV to take a position as a coal miner because the extermination business wasn’t paying the bills like he needed.

While talking to him one day when he came to finish up the sale of his home, he told me he was struggling because the pickup he had was on its last leg and he might not be able to make it to the mines. The body was mostly rust, there were holes all over and it wouldn’t pass inspection.
I handed him the keys to my prized possession, my Toyota pickup. Free of charge. I couldn’t believe I did it either, but it seemed right after everything I had seen him do over the years for other people. He drove the mess out of that thing for many years, until he worked his way to mine supervisor and was able to get a nice new vehicle, and move his family into a nice new home.

When I saw the truck again, he had hit 3 or 4 deer with it (they are everywhere in those mountains), the body was done (there is no way around it when you have to travel to the mines), but it still ran like a champ, and had gotten him where he needed to go in life. Well worth it to me.

The morale of the story is helping someone out one day, may save your bacon some day in the future.

Good luck, Rick. I know you’ll get it done. You seem like the type.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Well put Squibbly, I'll bet the majority of the members here feel the same way and would happily give not just Rick a hand but most members on this site.
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
OK. I am officially done for the day. I have hands on studied the chassis and I vacuum bled the brakes. I used the small pin vacuum in the bleeder with 25 lbs of vacuum and I am getting solid fluid with the bleeder cracked open the slightest bit. If I open the bleeder more, it is my opinion that the air bubbles I observe are coming thru the threads of the bleeder screw. If I wiggle the bleeder, I can see more bubbles. If I hand tighten it, I can watch the bubbles disappear. That is my story. I cannot push hard enough on the master cylinder to activate the brakes to lock. I can barely get fluid to come out when I am pushing with all my weight. My Wife was good enough to come out and open the bleeder. Pure fluid. I am going to attach a ratchet strap and tighten/draw the pintle towards the rear. I think that will work. Snow has called off my work for today and the icy driveway was flirting with disaster on my left knee. Nice full and clean master cylinder. DSCF8282.JPG I hung the safety chains up and prepared for the snow. DSCF8283.JPG The trailer is dry docked at this point until I get the wheels and tires together. I am happy with the progress, and this is a WIPP. Work In Progress Project. I refuse to have wet snow falling on me. I work in fair weather with no precipitation.
DSCF8284.JPG
I may have smudged the camera lenses with DOT 5. I just looked I did. But snow is falling, and I am back to R & R. SNAFU. The smudged lenses make my jack stands look safer. Be Safe. Have a Great Day.
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
WE HAVE TRAILER BRAKES. I didn't spend money and buy a special pressure bleeder. I was going to, but I thought about it all day and at 3PM when I came home from work, I worked my magic. I tried the prybar and the long lever. The lever looked like a good tool to knock my teeth out or slip and fall on my knee again. I went and retrieved my HD ratch strap. That was the winner. I had the pintle off and I removed the gas shock. I applied pressure to the pintle ring, and it bottomed out quickly. I did have some brake application and the drums were harder to turn but I could still turn them with resistance. I removed the pintle ring and replaced the gas shock in the pintle ring. I ratchet strapped it tight again and I see the springs on the master cylinder move away as I am tightening up. I go over to the drums and they are tight. Not locked up but tight. I open both bleeders and have perfect airless purple DOT 5 flowing. I mean just cracking the
bleeders and no air all clean fluid. I am convinced that the ratchet strap still cannot duplicate a full stop at 60 MPH and the trailer loaded with 4,000 lbs. I am happy with the results. The trailer brakes work as designed. This is my in-stock designer tool for bleeding surge brakes. I had everything right there and just needed to think it out.
DSCF8285.JPG
Anybody know what this is. I found it in the toolbox along with 4 ft copper grounding rods. DSCF8286.JPG DSCF8287.JPG I removed the rear stabilizer leg. DSCF8288.JPG It was destroyed in the bracket. DSCF8289.JPG I am going to cut these fasteners off and get that support leg bracket off the frame. I think I can straighten that bracket. Challenge accepted. So, I have brakes and that was my goal for today.
 

Attachments

ezgn

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
718
93
Location
Lake Elsinore Ca.
WE HAVE TRAILER BRAKES. I didn't spend money and buy a special pressure bleeder. I was going to, but I thought about it all day and at 3PM when I came home from work, I worked my magic. I tried the prybar and the long lever. The lever looked like a good tool to knock my teeth out or slip and fall on my knee again. I went and retrieved my HD ratch strap. That was the winner. I had the pintle off and I removed the gas shock. I applied pressure to the pintle ring, and it bottomed out quickly. I did have some brake application and the drums were harder to turn but I could still turn them with resistance. I removed the pintle ring and replaced the gas shock in the pintle ring. I ratchet strapped it tight again and I see the springs on the master cylinder move away as I am tightening up. I go over to the drums and they are tight. Not locked up but tight. I open both bleeders and have perfect airless purple DOT 5 flowing. I mean just cracking the
bleeders and no air all clean fluid. I am convinced that the ratchet strap still cannot duplicate a full stop at 60 MPH and the trailer loaded with 4,000 lbs. I am happy with the results. The trailer brakes work as designed. This is my in-stock designer tool for bleeding surge brakes. I had everything right there and just needed to think it out.
View attachment 856905
Anybody know what this is. I found it in the toolbox along with 4 ft copper grounding rods. View attachment 856906 View attachment 856907 I removed the rear stabilizer leg. View attachment 856908 It was destroyed in the bracket. View attachment 856909 I am going to cut these fasteners off and get that support leg bracket off the frame. I think I can straighten that bracket. Challenge accepted. So, I have brakes and that was my goal for today.
Way to go Rick, job well done.
 

ezgn

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
442
718
93
Location
Lake Elsinore Ca.
WE HAVE TRAILER BRAKES. I didn't spend money and buy a special pressure bleeder. I was going to, but I thought about it all day and at 3PM when I came home from work, I worked my magic. I tried the prybar and the long lever. The lever looked like a good tool to knock my teeth out or slip and fall on my knee again. I went and retrieved my HD ratch strap. That was the winner. I had the pintle off and I removed the gas shock. I applied pressure to the pintle ring, and it bottomed out quickly. I did have some brake application and the drums were harder to turn but I could still turn them with resistance. I removed the pintle ring and replaced the gas shock in the pintle ring. I ratchet strapped it tight again and I see the springs on the master cylinder move away as I am tightening up. I go over to the drums and they are tight. Not locked up but tight. I open both bleeders and have perfect airless purple DOT 5 flowing. I mean just cracking the
bleeders and no air all clean fluid. I am convinced that the ratchet strap still cannot duplicate a full stop at 60 MPH and the trailer loaded with 4,000 lbs. I am happy with the results. The trailer brakes work as designed. This is my in-stock designer tool for bleeding surge brakes. I had everything right there and just needed to think it out.
View attachment 856905
Anybody know what this is. I found it in the toolbox along with 4 ft copper grounding rods. View attachment 856906 View attachment 856907 I removed the rear stabilizer leg. View attachment 856908 It was destroyed in the bracket. View attachment 856909 I am going to cut these fasteners off and get that support leg bracket off the frame. I think I can straighten that bracket. Challenge accepted. So, I have brakes and that was my goal for today.
Did the trailer carry a generator? Maybe ground rods for operating the generator in the field? Just guessing. So removing the shock made operating the surge brake easier, that's the way to do it.
 

Mullaney

Well-known member
Supporting Vendor
4,822
10,268
113
Location
Charlotte NC
WE HAVE TRAILER BRAKES. I didn't spend money and buy a special pressure bleeder. I was going to, but I thought about it all day and at 3PM when I came home from work, I worked my magic. I tried the prybar and the long lever. The lever looked like a good tool to knock my teeth out or slip and fall on my knee again. I went and retrieved my HD ratch strap. That was the winner. I had the pintle off and I removed the gas shock. I applied pressure to the pintle ring, and it bottomed out quickly. I did have some brake application and the drums were harder to turn but I could still turn them with resistance. I removed the pintle ring and replaced the gas shock in the pintle ring. I ratchet strapped it tight again and I see the springs on the master cylinder move away as I am tightening up. I go over to the drums and they are tight. Not locked up but tight. I open both bleeders and have perfect airless purple DOT 5 flowing. I mean just cracking the
bleeders and no air all clean fluid. I am convinced that the ratchet strap still cannot duplicate a full stop at 60 MPH and the trailer loaded with 4,000 lbs. I am happy with the results. The trailer brakes work as designed. This is my in-stock designer tool for bleeding surge brakes. I had everything right there and just needed to think it out.
View attachment 856905
Anybody know what this is. I found it in the toolbox along with 4 ft copper grounding rods. View attachment 856906 View attachment 856907 I removed the rear stabilizer leg. View attachment 856908 It was destroyed in the bracket. View attachment 856909 I am going to cut these fasteners off and get that support leg bracket off the frame. I think I can straighten that bracket. Challenge accepted. So, I have brakes and that was my goal for today.
.
It appears to be a manual ground rod driver.
 

Squibbly

Well-known member
329
838
93
Location
South Carolina
WE HAVE TRAILER BRAKES. I didn't spend money and buy a special pressure bleeder. I was going to, but I thought about it all day and at 3PM when I came home from work, I worked my magic. I tried the prybar and the long lever. The lever looked like a good tool to knock my teeth out or slip and fall on my knee again. I went and retrieved my HD ratch strap. That was the winner. I had the pintle off and I removed the gas shock. I applied pressure to the pintle ring, and it bottomed out quickly. I did have some brake application and the drums were harder to turn but I could still turn them with resistance. I removed the pintle ring and replaced the gas shock in the pintle ring. I ratchet strapped it tight again and I see the springs on the master cylinder move away as I am tightening up. I go over to the drums and they are tight. Not locked up but tight. I open both bleeders and have perfect airless purple DOT 5 flowing. I mean just cracking the
bleeders and no air all clean fluid. I am convinced that the ratchet strap still cannot duplicate a full stop at 60 MPH and the trailer loaded with 4,000 lbs. I am happy with the results. The trailer brakes work as designed. This is my in-stock designer tool for bleeding surge brakes. I had everything right there and just needed to think it out.
View attachment 856905
Anybody know what this is. I found it in the toolbox along with 4 ft copper grounding rods. View attachment 856906 View attachment 856907 I removed the rear stabilizer leg. View attachment 856908 It was destroyed in the bracket. View attachment 856909 I am going to cut these fasteners off and get that support leg bracket off the frame. I think I can straighten that bracket. Challenge accepted. So, I have brakes and that was my goal for today.
Was there ever even a doubt you’d figure it out?

A few more days of hands on and you’ll know everything about this trailer including tips on improving the design.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
I went out this AM at 0530 and the brake drums are still holding tight. So I guess it is safe to assume if it held pressure all night the master cylinder is fine. Now I think I will release the ratchet strap and pull the wheel drums off. From looking at the design I must remove the center cap and remove the entire hub assembly. I need to know that this trailer didn't sit in a flood zone for 6 months under water. It has dirt on it but that all seems normal for an 11 year old vehicle that sat parked all that time. I mean Praying Mantis cocoons and all were under this chassis. I just removed them and put them in a safe dry place. I hope they hatch out in spring. Take Care. I am really getting into this project. It is good therapy for me. Be safe. I did not find anything on the internet that truly helped me resolve my trailer surge brake issues. Most pointed me to replacing parts. And anyone can replace parts. These OEM parts are probably better quality then the replacement parts.
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
I received my new replacement LED lamp and bracket. I still did not receive the recessed black plastic brackets that attach the lights to the body. I went out and looked at the light and I attempted to remove the ground wire. I was surprised that the ground wire had standard zinc nuts and not Stainless-steel nuts. I am going to drill all the rivets out that hold that aluminum corner on the main body and use my skills to straighten and align the bracket again. I will wait till I have a title and get it inspected. Right now, I will be getting the light working and getting some tires. I need 1 more Chevrolet wheel so I can get them sand blasted and painted. In the end I will be painting the trailer 1 color and want it to look good. Camouflage with the Rock Crusher is not in my plans. DSCF8276.JPGThis lamp was broken by an overzealous forklift operator. It will all work out. And I am enjoying the adventure as I used to in old days. Take Care and Be Safe.
 

marchplumber

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,343
1,118
113
Location
Peoria, Illinois
I received my new replacement LED lamp and bracket. I still did not receive the recessed black plastic brackets that attach the lights to the body. I went out and looked at the light and I attempted to remove the ground wire. I was surprised that the ground wire had standard zinc nuts and not Stainless-steel nuts. I am going to drill all the rivets out that hold that aluminum corner on the main body and use my skills to straighten and align the bracket again. I will wait till I have a title and get it inspected. Right now, I will be getting the light working and getting some tires. I need 1 more Chevrolet wheel so I can get them sand blasted and painted. In the end I will be painting the trailer 1 color and want it to look good. Camouflage with the Rock Crusher is not in my plans. View attachment 856964This lamp was broken by an overzealous forklift operator. It will all work out. And I am enjoying the adventure as I used to in old days. Take Care and Be Safe.
THAT is what it is ALL about!! Getting things done AND enjoying it!!! Thanks for the reminder, Rick!
 

flyfishtrailer

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
230
313
63
Location
Orangevale CA
Working on trailers is fun and generally you see the results of your work much faster than something with an engine in it. Restoring M100/M416 trailers is what started me down the green iron road LOL. Looks great so far CUCVRUS!
 

cucvrus

Well-known member
10,346
6,124
113
Location
Jonestown Pennsylvania
Yesterday I took time for R & R. Today after work I am going to open up the brake drums on the trailer chassis and see what I am dealing with. Without seeing what is in there I am not happy to say it is good. And good enough don't cut it for me. The only thing I have no control over is the outside temperatures. I will brave the cold and get the job done. Complete with pictures. Till then, Be Safe.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks