Generator to charge vehicles, Hummer Ford Tesla Volt

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
6,430
4,920
113
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
The future and now.
I seek which would be best MEP generator to charge Hummer, Ford, Tesla, Volt, Bolt, Nissan,
Honda, Toyota, Dodge, and a large number of other vehicles. Only one at a time, I only need one.

So when the utility company power is gone I will need a generator, sounds silly, costs a bunch
more for the power, but it 'll work.
Or, after any number of natural or man-made tragedies I will still need power.
I have never NOT had a vehicle when needed even during most lengthy outages.

Presently I can charge the Volt with the necessary home equipment and lighting both ON,
but that is with only an 10,000 peak propane/gasoline generator.
I can Switch from utility power to 220VAC outlet/inlet, already, safely.

Been in the study of military generators and have not found a "list" of generator versus their capabilities.
It would just run it flat out if necessary for the vehicle, then switch back to power all else I need.

So is there a list of MEP capabilities all in one place?
As in one versus another? This is just a short list of generators written about within SS.
002
003
006
016
802
803
804
805
806
and many more I attempt to study.
Looking to continue my study and asking for help.
 

Attachments

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
6,430
4,920
113
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Biggest thing is what KW capacity and voltage requirement you need
Even when I got everything I need ON I have never gone over 52kWh a day
With everything, all the pumps and equipment, normal household stuff and car
charging I saw 6-1/2 kWh per hour once. I could load shed 4 of those pumps I don't run all the time anyway and normally run at 3 to 4 kWh at a time as shown on the input 220VAC side.
So back to the question of which MEP would be good when I need to run load at
8000 watts, 8kWh constantly? Did I write that correct? Load would be no more than 11 HP .
I can't find an MEP list.
 

Scoobyshep

Well-known member
712
570
93
Location
Florida
Even when I got everything I need ON I have never gone over 52kWh a day
With everything, all the pumps and equipment, normal household stuff and car
charging I saw 6-1/2 kWh per hour once. I could load shed 4 of those pumps I don't run all the time anyway and normally run at 3 to 4 kWh at a time as shown on the input 220VAC side.
So back to the question of which MEP would be good when I need to run load at
8000 watts, 8kWh constantly? Did I write that correct? Load would be no more than 11 HP .
I can't find an MEP list.
It is a bit odd expressing in KWh because you could have a massive load for a short period and no load for the rest of the hour.

if you are looking for something that can take 8KW then I would go for a 003 or 803 (10 kw units). Next size up (004) is 15 kw
 

Coug

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
1,831
1,705
113
Location
Olympia/WA
(did a few edits as people corrected me)

part of this answer depends on what charger unit you are using.

Then it depends on if the charger is 3 phase or single phase.

If it's a single phase charger, going bigger than an MEP 003 or 803 won't do as much, because all the larger ones are 3 phase only (though there are a few exceptions if you rewire the leads of the stator yourself)
Which limits you to about 10kw of charging capability.

For the most part, the last 2 digits are the same for the same size generator.
MEP 002 and 802 are 5kw single or three phase
MEP 003 and 803 are 10kw single or three phase
MEP 004 and 804 are 15kw three phase only
MEP 005 and 805 are 30kw three phase only
MEP 006 and 806 are 60kw three phase only
MEP 007 and 807 are 100kw three phase only

mep 016 is a 3kw generator, single phase or three phase, and some versions are gasoline, others are diesel.

any generator that is 3 phase you can run single phase equipment off of using only 2 legs, but you can only use at most 2/3 of the rated power output to keep from overloading and destroying the windings in the generator.

The 002 and 003 are all air cooled diesels, and are pretty loud. Even with the ASK (Acoustic Suppression Kit) they are loud enough to hear from hundreds of yards away. If you live in the middle of nowhere then it doesn't matter much. If you live in a suburb or development, then you'll have a lot of people around you either annoyed or jealous or just plain mad at you for having power and making such a racket. Downside is these are really old units, I think it's like 30 or more years since they stopped making them.

The 80x series are liquid cooled and much quieter. I can have a normal conversation within a dozen yards of it, and it's possible to sleep in a tent with one running right outside once you get used to it. Downside is more things that can go wrong.

Now, all of the generators listed above (except maybe the 016) is designed to be a prime power unit. What this means is that it's designed to run all day, every day, for weeks or months on end no problem. This is a good thing if you have long outages on a regular basis. The downside is you tend to pay more for it up front compared to a similar output generator.

If you have maybe a week or two of outages a year, due to major storms or the like, then these units will fall apart from age and the elements long before you wear it out.
Another downside is you need to keep a decent load on them. Usually 50% rated load or more to keep it from wetstacking (the engine doesn't get hot enough to burn the fuel completely, so you get oily carbon in the exhaust and engine. Eventually it will plug up the exhaust and cause poor performance. If it starts to happen the fix is to run the generator under the heaviest load it will hold , up to 80 or 90% rated load, until the carbon buildup burns off/out of the engine)


If you are in a situation where you only MIGHT lose power every couple of years for a few weeks time, then sorry to say but the MEP generators might not be the best choice. Diesel, unless you treat it and keep all moisture out of it, typically goes bad within a year or less. Still longer than gasoline which is typically less than 6 months of storage untreated, but not as long as propane. Propane, since it is in a completely sealed tank and has no oxidizers in it, will last pretty much forever.

I have several customers that have electric vehicles, and the majority of them have single phase propane standby generators. Where they all live is near a big city (not many people in the middle of nowhere own electric cars) and still own gasoline powered backup vehicles, usually pickup trucks for when they need to do things the electric vehicle can't handle or if the power is out too long.
 
Last edited:

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
6,430
4,920
113
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
part of this answer depends on what charger unit you are using.

Then it depends on if the charger is 3 phase or single phase.

If it's a single phase charger, going bigger than an MEP 003 or 803 won't do as much, because all the larger ones are 3 phase only (though there are a few exceptions if you rewire the leads of the stator yourself)
Which limits you to about 10kw of charging capability.

For the most part, the last 2 digits are the same for the same size generator.
MEP 002 and 802 are 5kw single or three phase
MEP 003 and 803 are 10kw single or three phase
MEP 004 and 804 are 15kw three phase only
MEP 005 and 805 are 30kw three phase only
MEP 006 and 806 are 60kw three phase only
MEP 007 and 807 are 100kw three phase only

mep 016 is a 3kw generator, single phase only

any generator that is 3 phase you can run single phase equipment off of using only 2 legs, but you can only use at most 2/3 of the rated power output to keep from overloading and destroying the windings in the generator.

The 00x series are all air cooled diesels, and are pretty loud. Even with the ASK (Acoustic Suppression Kit) they are loud enough to hear from hundreds of yards away. If you live in the middle of nowhere then it doesn't matter much. If you live in a suburb or development, then you'll have a lot of people around you either annoyed or jealous or just plain mad at you for having power and making such a racket. Downside is these are really old units, I think it's like 30 or more years since they stopped making them.

The 80x series are liquid cooled and much quieter. I can have a normal conversation within a dozen yards of it, and it's possible to sleep in a tent with one running right outside once you get used to it. Downside is more things that can go wrong.

Now, all of the generators listed above (except maybe the 016) is designed to be a prime power unit. What this means is that it's designed to run all day, every day, for weeks or months on end no problem. This is a good thing if you have long outages on a regular basis. The downside is you tend to pay more for it up front compared to a similar output generator.

If you have maybe a week or two of outages a year, due to major storms or the like, then these units will fall apart from age and the elements long before you wear it out.
Another downside is you need to keep a decent load on them. Usually 50% rated load or more to keep it from wetstacking (the engine doesn't get hot enough to burn the fuel completely, so you get oily carbon in the exhaust and engine. Eventually it will plug up the exhaust and cause poor performance. If it starts to happen the fix is to run the generator under the heaviest load it will hold , up to 80 or 90% rated load, until the carbon buildup burns off/out of the engine)


If you are in a situation where you only MIGHT lose power every couple of years for a few weeks time, then sorry to say but the MEP generators might not be the best choice. Diesel, unless you treat it and keep all moisture out of it, typically goes bad within a year or less. Still longer than gasoline which is typically less than 6 months of storage untreated, but not as long as propane. Propane, since it is in a completely sealed tank and has no oxidizers in it, will last pretty much forever.

I have several customers that have electric vehicles, and the majority of them have single phase propane standby generators. Where they all live is near a big city (not many people in the middle of nowhere own electric cars) and still own gasoline powered backup vehicles, usually pickup trucks for when they need to do things the electric vehicle can't handle or if the power is out too long.
Thank You, I now understand your answers to my questions.
 

Scoobyshep

Well-known member
712
570
93
Location
Florida
part of this answer depends on what charger unit you are using.

Then it depends on if the charger is 3 phase or single phase.

If it's a single phase charger, going bigger than an MEP 003 or 803 won't do as much, because all the larger ones are 3 phase only (though there are a few exceptions if you rewire the leads of the stator yourself)
Which limits you to about 10kw of charging capability.

For the most part, the last 2 digits are the same for the same size generator.
MEP 002 and 802 are 5kw single or three phase
MEP 003 and 803 are 10kw single or three phase
MEP 004 and 804 are 15kw three phase only
MEP 005 and 805 are 30kw three phase only
MEP 006 and 806 are 60kw three phase only
MEP 007 and 807 are 100kw three phase only

mep 016 is a 3kw generator, single phase only

any generator that is 3 phase you can run single phase equipment off of using only 2 legs, but you can only use at most 2/3 of the rated power output to keep from overloading and destroying the windings in the generator.

The 00x series are all air cooled diesels, and are pretty loud. Even with the ASK (Acoustic Suppression Kit) they are loud enough to hear from hundreds of yards away. If you live in the middle of nowhere then it doesn't matter much. If you live in a suburb or development, then you'll have a lot of people around you either annoyed or jealous or just plain mad at you for having power and making such a racket. Downside is these are really old units, I think it's like 30 or more years since they stopped making them.

The 80x series are liquid cooled and much quieter. I can have a normal conversation within a dozen yards of it, and it's possible to sleep in a tent with one running right outside once you get used to it. Downside is more things that can go wrong.

Now, all of the generators listed above (except maybe the 016) is designed to be a prime power unit. What this means is that it's designed to run all day, every day, for weeks or months on end no problem. This is a good thing if you have long outages on a regular basis. The downside is you tend to pay more for it up front compared to a similar output generator.

If you have maybe a week or two of outages a year, due to major storms or the like, then these units will fall apart from age and the elements long before you wear it out.
Another downside is you need to keep a decent load on them. Usually 50% rated load or more to keep it from wetstacking (the engine doesn't get hot enough to burn the fuel completely, so you get oily carbon in the exhaust and engine. Eventually it will plug up the exhaust and cause poor performance. If it starts to happen the fix is to run the generator under the heaviest load it will hold , up to 80 or 90% rated load, until the carbon buildup burns off/out of the engine)


If you are in a situation where you only MIGHT lose power every couple of years for a few weeks time, then sorry to say but the MEP generators might not be the best choice. Diesel, unless you treat it and keep all moisture out of it, typically goes bad within a year or less. Still longer than gasoline which is typically less than 6 months of storage untreated, but not as long as propane. Propane, since it is in a completely sealed tank and has no oxidizers in it, will last pretty much forever.

I have several customers that have electric vehicles, and the majority of them have single phase propane standby generators. Where they all live is near a big city (not many people in the middle of nowhere own electric cars) and still own gasoline powered backup vehicles, usually pickup trucks for when they need to do things the electric vehicle can't handle or if the power is out too long.
The 004 and up are liquid cooled

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
 

glcaines

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,504
1,366
113
Location
Hiawassee, Georgia
Thanks, I found much interesting at
Please note that the MEP002A and MEP003A put out either 3 phase power or single phase power, but not both simultaneously. You have to manually switch the output. Both are excellent generators. I have an MEP003A that has been reliable and trouble-free for close to a decade now and I have numerous power outages.
 

Jeepadict

Well-known member
272
298
63
Location
Williams, AZ
The future and now.
I seek which would be best MEP generator to charge Hummer, Ford, Tesla, Volt, Bolt, Nissan,
Honda, Toyota, Dodge, and a large number of other vehicles. Only one at a time, I only need one.

So when the utility company power is gone I will need a generator, sounds silly, costs a bunch
more for the power, but it 'll work.
Or, after any number of natural or man-made tragedies I will still need power.
I have never NOT had a vehicle when needed even during most lengthy outages.

Presently I can charge the Volt with the necessary home equipment and lighting both ON,
but that is with only an 10,000 peak propane/gasoline generator.
I can Switch from utility power to 220VAC outlet/inlet, already, safely.

Been in the study of military generators and have not found a "list" of generator versus their capabilities.
It would just run it flat out if necessary for the vehicle, then switch back to power all else I need.

So is there a list of MEP capabilities all in one place?
As in one versus another? This is just a short list of generators written about within SS.
002
003
006
016
802
803
804
805
806
and many more I attempt to study.
Looking to continue my study and asking for help.
Which unit have you referenced in the attached pic?

Sent from my SM-G970U using Tapatalk
 

justacitizen

Active member
406
32
28
Location
oklahoma
just looking at this in a different angle. would a cheap used gasoline or diesel powered car keep you mobile until utility power is restored?
 

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
6,430
4,920
113
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
just looking at this in a different angle. would a cheap used gasoline or diesel powered car keep you mobile until utility power is restored?
Yes it will. A backup to a good plan is always recommended, ThankYou
I have known many that always, all their lives, always kept an extra running vehicle someplace. Would NOT use them for parts, and always maintained, extra mounted tires and parts in the trunk.
I always kept a Deuce because it had only one fuse, no electronics, and once running on most any fuel wouldn't quit. If I had land I would have kept all about 70 cars I ever had, but I have had no place to put them.
Also in the past in that menagerie of cars I always kept a Bug, a regular VW bug as I saw there was very little that would fail it and always started and ran. Even now at this age, today even, if I saw a Bug that has not been screwed with at a decent price I would just buy it and stick it in the back yard.
 

m715mike

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
2,490
2,131
113
Location
Montgomery, Texas
@Coug, thank you for the detailed information and explanations above. I know nothing about generators and found your write-up to be informative and easy to follow!
 

Coug

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
1,831
1,705
113
Location
Olympia/WA
@Coug, thank you for the detailed information and explanations above. I know nothing about generators and found your write-up to be informative and easy to follow!
You are welcome.

I don't actually know a huge amount about the military generators, but I make my living as a Generac Protector Series Technician, and work on plenty of home and commercial standby generators, so I tend to get asked about generators a lot.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks