M1102 trailer surge brake lubrication

LibertyCinamon

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I am looking for instruction on how to lubricate the slide bar connecting to the lunette ring which drives the surge brake. I have searched the forum, but could not find the information or instruction. If anyone who also knows the grease type that should be used, please provide the information. Thank you.
 

Coug

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Trailer manual can be found here:
The one for M1101/1102 is 3rd from the bottom



This is the page that shows the lubrication points on the surge brake assembly, and what type of grease.

M1101 surge lubrication -1.jpg
 

frank8003

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Coug

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On an application like this, the type of grease isn't really all that important.
What's important is actually having the points greased that need it.

GAA is used because it's the standard multipurpose grease, so it's what should be on hand.

It's not a high wear, high stress, fast moving, or anything else type part. Just some spots that need a little less friction.
 

Coug

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and if you are curious as to what type of grease GAA is, it's a lithium complex NLGI #2

GAA is an advanced lithium-complex thickened, multi-purpose NLGI Grade 2 grease. This product is composed primarily of synthetic hydrocarbon base stocks, gelling agents, anti-oxidants and corrosion inhibiting additives. Designed to operate over the temperature range of -54ºC to 121ºC (-65ºF to 250ºF).is intended for use as a long-life, general-purpose lubricant and to provide surface corrosion protection of all ground vehicles and equipment. It is also an excellent lubricant for automotive and industrial applications where a wide temperature range or where infrequent re-greasing is preferred. This grease may be used in other applications where a NLGI Grade 2 grease with good oxidation and salt water corrosion resistance is desirable. GAA is also suitable for use in extremely cold environments such as cold rooms, cold storage lockers, ice plants, and on refrigeration or cold storage equipment. It will resist such environmental contact as humidity, ice, and road salts without hardening, washing off or deteriorating.
 

tobyS

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Almost every one I have seen has bent bracket inside and that gives it too much room to get a head start before the brake apply. Take it apart and bend the metal bracket back, THEN think about grease. And in mine, I add a 3/8" bolt as safety stop to lock it out. You about have to know exactly where the plunger is in home position for its location....don't give it too much room to move around. See the bend in the plunger on second photo. The mount bracket for the cylinder is bent too....needs made straight.
 

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LibertyCinamon

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I use wheel bearing grease on mine. Works well.
Thank you all for your helps. I worked on it last Friday taking the bar off to lubricate. Since the trailer appeared to be of little use from the condition and the tire wear, the sliding bar was dry as a bone. Additionally there was no sign of lubrication ever applied since it was built and delivered to the Marines in 2012. I am wondering if the lubrication was even necessary. Two rollers in the assembly where one is near the front and top of the bar and the other one is inside the bar attaching to the aft part of the damper were dry but roll smoothly without much friction. Any way, I did not get the message from Gary in time so I used the white lithium grease listed as NLGI 2 grade. It was easier to clean than the bearing grease.
 

Coug

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part of it also depends on where it is used.
Some place with a lot of rain or whatnot, lubrication is good, especially if it sits a lot not being used.

Somewhere dusty/sandy like the desert, some surfaces are better off not being lubricated with grease because it will stick to the sand and grit, which can cause accelerated wear compared to no lubrication. Pins or bushings or stuff like that that is protected from the sand are probably good to grease, and clean up and fresh grease often. Wear points that are exposed to the sand/grit might not be so good.

Some of the dry lubricants out on the market might be better than nothing in that type of situation, or might not.
 

LibertyCinamon

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It is quite a good trailer for camping. We must have put in nearly 20K miles since built camping all over the southwest from California to NM and the national parks in the North Rim area of Grand Canyon. The recent trip was to Chaco Canyon and Taos. The trailer serves without fail through some of the roughest terrains and roads. It was a tough one going into Chaco Canyon on the “historical accurate” road leading in from the south entrance.
 

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