Really dirty gas tank, hope yours is not.

sallystrothers

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
36
13
8
Location
boise, id
I discovered that my gas tank needed dropped, maybe in an indirect way, but I wanted to post to warn others that they should potentially address their tank as well. The story started with my fuel gauge not working. After replacing the gauge, which incidentally was scratched and full of dust, the new gauge also didn't work. I started with the volt meter at the gauge and worked my way back. When I got to the sender, I discovered the the problem. The sender was not plugged in at all. Additionally, the sender was not even bolted in. It was just sitting on the tank loose (luckily I have an access port). The entire top of the tank was coated in a greasy 1/4 in thick layer of dirt mixed with diesel. It looked to me this issue existed whilst this vehicle was still in service. I then took it upon myself to pull out the fuel sender, and then "feel around" the bottom of the tank with a wooden dowel. Needless to say I felt a lot of grit, so I dropped the tank, which, by the way, was more difficult than I imagined. After dropping the tank, I was immediately relieved, as the bottom was coated in an excessive amount of debris. Its been cleaned, and now drying prior to figuring out how to get it all back together. Here is a picture.

I post this because I believe this represented a reliability issue, if left unattended, possibly while jostling around 4-wheeling at varying angles, that the fuel sock could become overwhelmed. Should you have similar dreams of breaking down in the wilderness, like I did while sleeping at night, do yourself a favor and check out your tank.
 

Attachments

Action

Well-known member
3,579
1,474
113
Location
East Tennessee
You mention how hard it was to get the tank out. Did you remove the rear propshaft? Make sure the front vertical straps are to the RH side of the dimples during install. The tank should end up very close to the frame rail.
 

sallystrothers

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
36
13
8
Location
boise, id
You mention how hard it was to get the tank out. Did you remove the rear propshaft? Make sure the front vertical straps are to the RH side of the dimples during install. The tank should end up very close to the frame rail.
Yes I removed it, hope to get it back in by this weekend. Does anyone know if it is a problem that the baffle is not connected to the tank?
 

papakb

Well-known member
2,107
746
113
Location
San Jose, Ca
With the huge number of HMMWVs that have sat out in the Yermo sunshine for years without the benefit of their fuel filler caps is it any wonder there tons of crud in the tanks? One of the very first thing any new HMMWV owner should focus on doing is flushing ALL the fluids and replacing belts and noses. If you want to play Russian roulette and start your new toy and suck up a bunch of garbage into your injector pump be my guest but thats a couple hundred dollars you really don't need to spend. So with winter coming as you sit by the fire AND READ YOUR TM 9 2320-280-10, you'll feel good knowing you did it right this time! ;)
 

Retiredwarhorses

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
3,423
1,371
113
Location
Brentwood, Calif
With the huge number of HMMWVs that have sat out in the Yermo sunshine for years without the benefit of their fuel filler caps is it any wonder there tons of crud in the tanks? One of the very first thing any new HMMWV owner should focus on doing is flushing ALL the fluids and replacing belts and noses. If you want to play Russian roulette and start your new toy and suck up a bunch of garbage into your injector pump be my guest but thats a couple hundred dollars you really don't need to spend. So with winter coming as you sit by the fire AND READ YOUR TM 9 2320-280-10, you'll feel good knowing you did it right this time! ;)
well, it’s certainly more than a couple hundred dollars, that’s for damn sure.
 

sallystrothers

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
36
13
8
Location
boise, id
The tank is back in, actually easier to get it back in than it was to take it out. Needed to replace the front bottom fuel tank strap, as it was previously bashed in pretty good by a rock or something. I'm sure that was how the baffle was dislodged from the tank. I siphoned the fuel back in using 5-gal buckets on the roof. Running now, but I think there is some air in the system, despite opening the fuel filter bleeder. It idles fine, but after throttling it up and immediately letting off the pedal it will stall out. I might crack open an injector line to continue bleeding it out.
 

sallystrothers

Member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
36
13
8
Location
boise, id
Actually forgot to mention, there was about 2/3 of a gallon of water in the tank before I started this entire process. I was surprised at the amount and assume that is not normal.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks