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Thread: Most Common Rods

  1. #11
    4 Star General Artisan's Avatar
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    AWSOME info Thank U !

    I just found a great little article explains many things HERE at MillerWelds.com
    but it does not talk about rod diameter. Are there any rules of thumb or
    tables that dictate what thickness rod you should use?

    Lets say I am basically just dealing w/ mild steel.
    I might want to weld up .125" thru .375" mostly.
    VERIFY true everything I say/suggest, ALWAYS. Do NOT take my word as Gospel.
    I have been know to make mistakes! Believe it!

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  2. #12
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    Thinner rod for thinner materials. 3/32" 6010 rod can be used on some pretty thin steel, and can also be used on thicker stuff with multiple passes.

    You really shouldn't need more than 1/8" rods for anything up to 3/8" plate. Thinner rods are going to be easier to control and you can use thin rods on thick steel by means of multiple passes.

    Example - 6 inch schedule 40 pipe can be welded nicely in 3 passes. First pass is 1/8" 6010 @ 92amps, then 2 additional passes with 3/32" 7018 @ 92 amps.

  3. #13
    Moderator m16ty's Avatar
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    I use 1/8 rods for just about everything. I may go down to 3/32 on some thin steel but I'll usually mig or tig anything thinner than 1/8" steel if I'm at the shop.

    Mig has kind of spoiled me and I don't stick as much as I used to. About the only time I use stick anymore is out in the field or nasty metal.
    Last edited by m16ty; 03-19-2016 at 16:55.
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    I went to flux core wire feeder 25 years ago and have never looked back.

    It is like having a never ending Rod.

    I prefer the Lincoln wire over the generic.

  5. #15
    dumpsterlandingfromorbit! gimpyrobb's Avatar
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    Most folks when starting to weld want to travel too fast. Slow and steady makes for good fusion of metals. If you have some time, check out these videos, he knows his stuff.

    http://www.weldingtipsandtricks.com/...ng-videos.html
    Don't worry about the size difference

  6. #16
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    I have some welding to do in the next week or two.

    The brackets attached to my 6 foot finish mower deck have shattered the deck where they are welded to at some point. Gimp and I put it up last night and after cleanup you could see shatter cracks in a circle about 4 inches in diameter surrounding the deck on the bottom where the brackets are welded to the top.

    I originally wanted to weld three pieces, one to each side of the bracket and one on the front of the deck that would be welded to the bracket and the two new pieces and then run weld a piece under the deck cross ways to spread out the load. that idea lasted until I started grinding the old welds. A. Couldn't get the grinder into one of the spots and B. I would have to butt weld all the tracks before mounting all the new stuff.

    Gimpy talked me into letting him cut the bracket off completely and welding the piece onto the bracket, putting a 35 inch by 12 inch plate across the bottom of the deck and drilling bolt holes through it and the old deck and the new angle iron pieces on the top on the sides of the bracket.

    How much we weld depends on how this fab job looks after we get it back together.

    I have my Dad's old Fourney A/C welder.

    My plan is to use 6011 for any and all of the not so clean (dirty and rusty) stuff) deck and new plating. The 1/4in angle to the 3/8in bracket will most likely get a pass with 6011 and maybe a 7018 or MG500 weave pattern on top.


    Pics of the deck and one of the welds on my newly fabbed LED light bar on the tractor itself. I thought I was using a 1/8in 6011 rod but after looking at all my rods I have no idea what I used for it. I know you can see I was running 140A on the welder for it which worked well but seems a little hot for that small of a rod and weld material.

    20160514_123505.jpg20160518_182834.jpg

    20160518_182851.jpg20160518_182828.jpg
    sw

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    4 Star General Artisan's Avatar
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    Boy that weld on the Angle iron looks professional!

    RE cleaning up and grinding in tight places; I use a small handheld
    blaster. It works amazingly well. I have a Media Blast and Abrasives
    "VIPER" glass bead blasting cabinet and occasionally I change the glass
    beads. I save it all and use it in my handheld.

    CLICK HERE to see the exact blaster I have. Just load w/ your choice
    of media, hook up air, adjust flow-feed rate and
    hit those internal miter's corners and watch the magic.

    They have attachments to do spot blasting w/o the mess too.

    This tool is a "Gotta Haveit" tool in my book. It is FAST and
    does an amazing job for the DIYer.
    VERIFY true everything I say/suggest, ALWAYS. Do NOT take my word as Gospel.
    I have been know to make mistakes! Believe it!

    Regards,
    Artisan

    " I am solid, and steady, and true down to the core... "

    M925A1 "Squach" 1986 Serviced by HoneyWell & assumed part of the
    Marine Corps Maritime Prepositioning Force Program, Blount Island Command
    Jacksonville FL. Truck retrieved from Ft Lewis, WA. 11-2012
    Read more HERE Original colors tan, repaint. 100% Functional
    27,555 Miles

    M916 "Rebel" 1979 Rebuilt 2008 w/ 967 Miles on it.
    Purchased from Fontana GL w/ bad tranny, it was
    replaced w/ a new tranny at about 1200 miles. A/C
    was added, Alternator and divorced LED diagnostic
    regulator as designed for M915 trucks was added.

    Schutt 2009 20' Container Self Loading/Unloading trailer.
    Currently upgrading to carry vehicles and cargo w/ an
    LMTV Portable Crane, loop rings and banjo chain cutouts.

  8. #18
    Modertator swbradley1's Avatar
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    Well, Gimpy and I got the mower to the point where I could weld it up.

    I grabbed a small 6011 to run a bead on scrap to get started and did not like the way it looked so I opened up the dry tube with the MG500 rods in it.

    Holy cow! At 130 or 140A the bead looked like a TIG bead. I proceeded to weld the heck out of everything with the 500s and never looked back. Granted some of the welds looked better than others and most of the "not so good" welds were with my left hand. My right hand is more experienced.

    I'll get a pic at some point.
    sw

    Yes, that's an image of my skull.

  9. #19
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    That welder appears to be a Thunderbolt XL 225/150 AC/DC unit. Nice tool and about all many folks will ever need. As you already found millerwelds.com you can download the correct manual for it (you'll need the serial number). Get the spec sheet for it too. Strangely enough that can make getting started easier because it has better pics than the manual.

    Then cruise over to linclolnelectric.com and spend the eight bucks for the Welder's Pocket Guide. I still have my first edition copy but recently bought the most up to date edition (30th, 31st or some such).

    While you are there you can spend few dollars on welding calculators for whatever type of welding you expect to do. They are really handy, especially for finding a starting point on a new application or if (like me) you don't weld often enough to remember every setting for every rod, diameter and position. Order the C2-410 pocket stick welding guide (it's free) or you can download it. And, download or order the safety guide and read it (I think the print copy is free, too).

    And then go to weldingtipsandtricks.com (**** good advice there....) and subscribe to the weekly video. When you have time, start watching the archived videos of the type of welding, equipment etc you're interested in.

    I keep 7018, 6010, 6011, 6013 in a couple of diameters and a small assortment of gouging, cutting, stainless, cast iron/steel and other specialty rods on hand on our farm. 7018 has to be fresh from an unopened package or kept heated in a rod oven for any critical work. Don't believe any story that you can keep it forever in some magic container with pixie dust. For code jobs it is often issued out of a fresh package or a rod oven multiple times a shift. You can however dry it one time in a hot oven-see the manufacturer for directions-and get good results. Not great or particularly neat but good.


    Lance

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  11. #20
    dumpsterlandingfromorbit! gimpyrobb's Avatar
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    No need for welding calculators, Miller has an app for that! Down load it free.
    Don't worry about the size difference

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to gimpyrobb For This Useful Post:

    LanceRobson (05-26-2016)

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