Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 17 of 17

Thread: Pulling engine and transmission to insulate firewall?

  1. #11
    General
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    466
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 131 Times in 107 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alpine44 View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions. I'll look for the
    interior padding. Pulling the engine and insulating the firewall is an add-on project to the main task of installing A/C .The interior firewall is bare and easy to get to at the moment.

    Harmonic balancer is already ordered and hoses/belts will be replaced. I added dual block heaters when I lived in Montana.
    You misunderstood or I did explain correctly, the civvie insulating blanket mounted to the front of the firewall UNDER the hood! It extended all the way from side to and the fenders need to be removed to remove/install the blanket along with heater box/master cyl and electrical stuff. Lots of work and very hard to find but well worth the time and effort to install, you can actually drive at highway speeds and talk not shout! I've only seen one or two for sale over the years and I just sold a truck with one. A civvie hood blanket will help cut engine noise too.

  2. #12
    General
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    466
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 131 Times in 107 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sharecropper View Post
    I have also pondered how to insulate the firewall and floor over the transmission. My current thinking is to thoroughly clean and de-grease the surfaces and apply 3M spray undercoating. But if you can figure out a way to effectively and permanently add insulation to those areas, I'll buy in. Because those areas are pretty much inaccessible with the engine and transmission in place, whatever is applied needs to be a permanent application. 2-3 coats of spray undercoating, applied one after the other to build a coating thickness of 1/4" or so, would add a measure of sound and thermal protection, which might be acceptable for my needs. Please keep us informed of what you decide in this regard.

    Hope this helps.
    Don't use undercoating, even 3M. I'd use a good two part bed liner sprayed on after degreasing and scuffing it. Much more durable than undercoat and it's chemically activated so you don't have to worry about heat softening it up. It costs more but with all your doing and the money you've spent this is peanuts!
    Make sure you use a TWO PART system that you mix the resin and hardener, do NOT waste your time and money on one part rattle can junk! As a bonus you can also spray the inside of the cab and up the firewall and side panels and under the seat, not only will it help insulate it makes wash outs a breeze! Just open the doors and hose it out.

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to nyoffroad For This Useful Post:

    Sharecropper (07-21-2019)

  4. #13
    Sergeant Major
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 53 Times in 41 Posts

    Default

    On my 1008 I used 3m sound deadener in cab and jute padding under carpet. I have used dynamat products, but couldn't justify the expense on a work truck. Still assembling, so can't give results! On my camaro i used dynamat extreme and dynamat liner on interior. Then used a heat shield pad vicinity of headers, exhaust etc. This has been on over a year, once stuck on it doesn't come off (peel off stuff). Flexible enough to bend, but fairly stiff. Think i used DEI floor and tunnel shield? Think this would be more effective for heat than bedliner, etc... Expensive, but you get what you pay for!

  5. #14
    General
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Rochester NY
    Posts
    466
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 131 Times in 107 Posts

    Default

    I was just on the LMC web site and saw a interior insulating kit for the floor all the way front to back, of course that means carpet or some kind of floor mats

  6. #15
    Colonel
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    216
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 80 Times in 53 Posts

    Default

    FWIW..........

    Consider painting the fire wall with "LizasdSkin" insulation and sound control see;

    http://lizardskin.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/lizardskin-application-instructions.pdf

    If you are going to the time to remove the engine and transmission I would use the "LizasdSkin" and then put insulation on top.

    Regards

    Joseh
    "Equipment should never be an excuse for poor performance.
    If You are going to be a Professional, You get the correct equipment.
    Then the only excuse is Your ability to perform"

  7. #16
    4 Star General Sharecropper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Paris KY
    Posts
    1,161
    Thanks
    543
    Thanked 705 Times in 338 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jozseph View Post
    FWIW..........
    Consider painting the fire wall with "LizasdSkin" insulation and sound control see;
    http://lizardskin.com/wp-content/upl...structions.pdf
    If you are going to the time to remove the engine and transmission I would use the "LizasdSkin" and then put insulation on top.
    Regards

    Joseh
    I considered Lizard Skin, however after reading about the product on their website, I can't see how the recommended thickness could add much insulation or sound control at all. They recommend the first coat of sound control (to be sprayed with their spray gun which you must also purchase) to be applied at 20 mills wet thickness. 1 mil is equal to one-thousandth of an inch, or .001. So 20 mils is .020 of an inch. Heck that's less than 1/32" thick. Then the next coat of insulation is to be sprayed on top of the first at an equal wet thickness of 20 mills, which is also less than 1/32" thick. After curing, the thickness of both coats will end up at approximately 1/16". This is no magic product, and in my opinion there's just no way a 1/16" coating of anything is going to provide much insulation at all. And it is expensive. And you must purchase their spray gun. And the stuff must be thoroughly mixed in its container with a special mixer (also purchased from them). And you must tape-off the surrounding areas before spraying. And if you discover later that you missed a spot, well, you know the drill. I believe I will pass on Lizard Skin, thank you.

    I'm looking for a spray product that is readily available and easy to apply. And easy to touch up and/or add to later. From off the shelf, readily available. With the ability to build thickness.

    So what would that product be?

    SORRY ALPINE FOR HIJACKING YOUR THREAD! I'll shut up now.
    Last edited by Sharecropper; 07-23-2019 at 13:31. Reason: typo

  8. #17
    4 Star General richingalveston's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    galveston/Texas
    Posts
    1,564
    Thanks
    21
    Thanked 485 Times in 337 Posts

    Default

    have you looked at the ceramic beads that you add to the paint. you can use any paint but these ceramic beads are probably the best for a paint on application.

    for the interior of my 1009 I used 3 of the lmc products. The asphalt based kit. I put 2 layers of it in, (3 in some areas) then the carpet pad which is approx. 1/2 thick and then the rubber liner on top of that. My truck is pretty quiet. I also used the interior fire wall blanket on the fire wall.
    Rich
    Galveston, Texas
    85 M1009, 6.5 GEP w/Leroy A-team turbo banks manifold, 4l80e/US shift controller, 205 with ORD Magnum, 4.56 gears, Front - D60 E-locker - 4 inch TC front springs w/zero rate, Rear - 14 bolt D-locker, stock springs ORD shackle flip w/zero rate, 16 inch GM/hutchinson Aluminum double bead locks w 11X39 XZL tires. PSC hydro assist steering.

  9. #18
    Sergeant Major
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    149
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 53 Times in 41 Posts

    Default

    Guess I'll jump back in..... I did extensive research when i re-did the interior in the Camaro. I had also researched sound deadening materials prior for customers cars at the shop (Vintage, British, etc).

    The more home work i did i finally figured out that every product was usually compared to the dynamat extreme. Seems like they're the "bench mark". Some of the asphalt cheapies (lowes, HD, and others) were reported to give off some fumes. Some of the other products were a little cheaper, but had mixed reviews. This was i job i was going to do once, and I've never spared any expense on this vehicle anyway. Put down dynamat extreme, then the dyna liner over the top. Also did rear package tray and rear seat back panel. Put as much as i could in the door skins, and some of the door panel underneath the door card. As stated before, used DEI heat insulation underneath the car above headers and exhaust. Once that products is firmly pressed in place it's NOT coming off very easily! And, it will bring paint with it. It was a big PITA.... With that said, noise levels in the car are much less. Car exhaust was loud, road noise, etc, etc. Gets rid of a lot of resonance also. Doors sound solid now when they close, not tinny.... Also did a good job heat wise... Kind of ironic, twenty years ago i was stripping wight out as it was a dedicated drag car!

    My 08 got the 3m sound deadening pads. Around $80 with shipping for a box of 10 sheets i think. Probably as thick as the dynamat extreme, but apx half the price. I've used this in lower end restorations and it does make a difference. Once again, worth doing.... I normally only drive this apx 1500 miles a year, so didn't go crazy like the Camaro...

    Not a big fan of material other than paint underneath vehicle. Have seen undercoating chip, flake, etc and once moisture gets behind it holds it and accelerates the decomposition! And, unless you get rid of ALL the rust and properly prep prior to paint or coatings it kind of becomes a waste of money!

    My cab (thanks Rick!) was media blasted and epoxy primered. Debated using Rustoleum, but ended up using Eastwood chassis black over the primer. Same program for the frame. Been in the rebuild process for over a year, haven't driven it, so can't tell how it will hold up...

    **** rabbit holes.....

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •