Air Horn installation on M1045A2

JetbikeAnt

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Hello All, I'm tired of the wimpy horn on my M1045A2 and have purchased Military truck Air horns that I will mount under my LVVOS front driver's side bracket. My question is, I want to route the wire and 3/8" air hose through my windshield frame to keep it clean looking. Getting those in from the front does not seem too awful, but getting the wires and hose out and down to the rear side passenger under seat does. Any suggestions? Going through the bottom of the windshield frame seems the best way, but I don't think its possible. Thanks in advance!
 

ToddJK

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Are you trying to utilize the same air line for the wipers? I'm not very familiar with these trucks so I'm just trying to picture it in my head from the little bit I have seen inside of one.
 

ToddJK

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Wipers are electric. There's no onboard air (until added aftermarket).

Sorry, I have no idea about routing the lines...
Oh jeez, lol. Here I thought it was air. I didn't ask when I rode in Jason's humvee at the rally. I guess I was just to in awe in every it was climbing over so effortlessly!
 

JetbikeAnt

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Morning Gents. I mounted my Air compressor and tank under the Passenger side rear seat. That came out great. I will install a pressure gauge in the command center as well with a on / off switch for the compressor. It would be much easier to mount the horns themselves in the engine compartment, but their way too cool looking. Since i need to drill holes for the well-nuts for the LVVOS mounting brackets anyway, I was going to drill a third hole, install a grommet, and run the lines inside the windshield frame. Problem is where do I get them out. Figured I could phish them out where the Tac wires exit maybe, but that would still look goofy. I'll send pics as I go if anyone is interested. Thanks!
 

Mainsail

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Some years ago I owned a 1986 Ford Ranger XLT with the off-road package. I wanted an air horn in it, and this is how it was done.

I sourced the air horn from a steel scrapyard, it was attached to the roof of a semi-tractor body that had been scrapped. I also bought the dual-needle air pressure gauge from inside the cab as well.

The horn was about 3’ long. It was fitted with the edge of the business end in front of a hole in the radiator core support, and the back was almost to the firewall. By the way, I didn’t drill a single hole anywhere for any of the components- I fabbed up brackets to existing holes or fasteners.

I found a small aluminum tank, about 1 to 1½ gals I guess, and mounted that up under the right rear wheel well.

I used a 12v cheap compressor mounted to the inside of the left front fender, under the hood. All the plastic body parts of the compressor were removed.

It was plumbed thusly; A toggle switch on the dash energized the compressor which charged the tank, (air-brake lines and fittings) using a check-valve to keep the tank pressurized. A T fitting on the tank side of the check-valve fed one needle on the gauge, another T fitting before the check-valve fed the other needle to tell compressor pressure. So when the tank needed recharging, one needle had the tank pressure, the other needle was at zero. When the compressor was turned on, the one needle would rise until it met the tank pressure needle, and then they’d move up together until the tank was full. At that point I had a manual unloading valve to dump the compressor side pressure (compressor couldn’t restart if there was pressure left).

I had an electric solenoid air valve to dump tank pressure to the horn, with a push-button switch on the gearshift lever (since that was where my hand was usually resting. I also wired it to one of the aux outputs of the alarm system, so I could blow the horn from far away.

That horn was LOUD too. I stripped it all out before I sold the truck, so it’s all in a box somewhere around here…

EDIT to add: I don't think the whole mess cost me more than $60 to $80 at the time.
 
Last edited:

Mullaney

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Some years ago I owned a 1986 Ford Ranger XLT with the off-road package. I wanted an air horn in it, and this is how it was done.

I sourced the air horn from a steel scrapyard, it was attached to the roof of a semi-tractor body that had been scrapped. I also bought the dual-needle air pressure gauge from inside the cab as well.

The horn was about 3’ long. It was fitted with the edge of the business end in front of a hole in the radiator core support, and the back was almost to the firewall. By the way, I didn’t drill a single hole anywhere for any of the components- I fabbed up brackets to existing holes or fasteners.

I found a small aluminum tank, about 1 to 1½ gals I guess, and mounted that up under the right rear wheel well.

I used a 12v cheap compressor mounted to the inside of the left front fender, under the hood. All the plastic body parts of the compressor were removed.

t was plumbed thusly; A toggle switch on the dash energized the compressor which charged the tank, (air-brake lines and fittings) using a check-valve to keep the tank pressurized. A T fitting on the tank side of the check-valve fed one needle on the gauge, another T fitting before the check-valve fed the other needle to tell compressor pressure. So when the tank needed recharging, one needle had the tank pressure, the other needle was at zero. When the compressor was turned on, the one needle would rise until it met the tank pressure needle, and then they’d move up together until the tank was full. At that point I had a manual unloading valve to dump the compressor side pressure (compressor couldn’t restart if there was pressure left).

I had an electric solenoid air valve to dump tank pressure to the horn, with a push-button switch on the gearshift lever (since that was where my hand was usually resting. I also wired it to one of the aux outputs of the alarm system, so I could blow the horn from far away.

That horn was LOUD too. I stripped it all out before I sold the truck, so it’s all in a box somewhere around here…
.
Neat!!

If you find it decide that it needs a new home, I would be happy to trade you the horn and parts for money.
 

chucky

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I'm using Military Truck Air horns. My Tank and Compressor are in place. Not much room, but just enough. Decided to do some insulation as well. Looks pretty clean. I'll send a picture of my Horns next.
View attachment 870973
Have you already herd how loud it is since youve plumbed it ? Like a test toot ! my reason for asking is air horns take alot of air most of the time in big volume burst so the biggest hose and swing valve to change tone by how far and quick you open and close valve by hand instead of the generic toot toot .
 

JetbikeAnt

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
135
121
43
Location
Elverson, PA
Some years ago I owned a 1986 Ford Ranger XLT with the off-road package. I wanted an air horn in it, and this is how it was done.

I sourced the air horn from a steel scrapyard, it was attached to the roof of a semi-tractor body that had been scrapped. I also bought the dual-needle air pressure gauge from inside the cab as well.

The horn was about 3’ long. It was fitted with the edge of the business end in front of a hole in the radiator core support, and the back was almost to the firewall. By the way, I didn’t drill a single hole anywhere for any of the components- I fabbed up brackets to existing holes or fasteners.

I found a small aluminum tank, about 1 to 1½ gals I guess, and mounted that up under the right rear wheel well.

I used a 12v cheap compressor mounted to the inside of the left front fender, under the hood. All the plastic body parts of the compressor were removed.

It was plumbed thusly; A toggle switch on the dash energized the compressor which charged the tank, (air-brake lines and fittings) using a check-valve to keep the tank pressurized. A T fitting on the tank side of the check-valve fed one needle on the gauge, another T fitting before the check-valve fed the other needle to tell compressor pressure. So when the tank needed recharging, one needle had the tank pressure, the other needle was at zero. When the compressor was turned on, the one needle would rise until it met the tank pressure needle, and then they’d move up together until the tank was full. At that point I had a manual unloading valve to dump the compressor side pressure (compressor couldn’t restart if there was pressure left).

I had an electric solenoid air valve to dump tank pressure to the horn, with a push-button switch on the gearshift lever (since that was where my hand was usually resting. I also wired it to one of the aux outputs of the alarm system, so I could blow the horn from far away.

That horn was LOUD too. I stripped it all out before I sold the truck, so it’s all in a box somewhere around here…

EDIT to add: I don't think the whole mess cost me more than $60 to $80 at the time.
Pretty much the same setup except for where I placed the Tank and compressor. Also, my Horns have a 24 Solenoid. One other difference is I plan on tying the eclectic into my regular wimpy horn for actuation. Thanks for sharing!
 

JetbikeAnt

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
135
121
43
Location
Elverson, PA
Have you already herd how loud it is since youve plumbed it ? Like a test toot ! my reason for asking is air horns take alot of air most of the time in big volume burst so the biggest hose and swing valve to change tone by how far and quick you open and close valve by hand instead of the generic toot toot .
Yes, it blew loud and strong for 35 seconds on the bench. I have a video of it, but I was recovering from the Wuhflu and was in my Robe. Maybe I'll still try and post it. Scared the Shit out of my Wife when it went off. LOL. I'm using 3/8" airline to the Horns and 1/4" airlines to my gauge.
 
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