Any help identifying this small articulated vehicle?

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waayfast

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When I was in high school ('bout 700 years ago:-() the local veternarian (horse Doc) bought one.

I remember it had NDT tires like you find on a Jeep and likely the same size.It was kind of primitive. Think it was powered by a B&S and some kind of centrifigal clutch. It did articulate on the roll axis but steering was not good --seem like it took a 40 acre field to turn around in. I think it was supposed to be a swimmer but not with me in it!! No suspension and it rode very very rough, but I did not mind because the Vets daughter that was driving was VERY well endowed:D.
 

axlr8

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i thought id share some info....theres a new line of them called coot2 as in coot squared....they are diesel and theres a guy down the road a few miles form me that has one and is actually a dealer...they are sweet! look at youtube...seems to have come along way!
 

axlr8

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ive seen that thing crawl over 35 gallon drums, stumps about 2-3 feet off the ground....it has gut wrenching torque like no other. :p
 

John Mc

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It has an output shaft in the rear for one more trailer with a drive axel
Actually, that output shaft was for the optional propeller outdrive. without the prop, it would go about 2 knots in the water, just from spinning it's tires. With the prop, the water speed increased to about 5 knots
 
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John Mc

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Just realized I resurrected a 5 years dormant thread here. Sorry about that. I own 2 Coots. They were fun vehicles. Amphibious, articulated in the middle to keep all 4 wheels on the ground. 4 Wheel Drive, originally powered by a 12 HP single cylinder Tecumseh engine. These were geared more for torque than for speed - top speed was about 20 MPH. All drive components other than the wheels were inside the tubs, giving a smooth belly with about 12" of ground clearance. It was driven by a variable ratio Comet clutch (similar to what was used on older snowmobiles) connected to a transmission with 2 forward gears and one reverse (plus the variable clutch ratio). Chain drive from the transmission output to the driveshaft. Driveshaft turned a worm gear set up to drive the front axle and another in the rear.

There were no differentials, so all four wheels turned the same speed all the time. That plus the high ground clearance resulted in a vehicle that would go just about anywhere - it was tough to get it stuck. The weak point was the steering. Without differentials, it took a lot of room to turn one around. This was (partially) remedied by a 4 wheel steer (4WS) option available on later models (there was a mechanical linkage to rear steering). The 4WS was enugh of an improvement that many owners of 2WS versions have converted theirs to 4WS.

The Coot users web site has moved since the earlier posts in this thread were made. It's now here:
https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/cootworld/

My "work Coot" (looks rough, runs well, a few mods such as 16 HP Briggs Vanguard engine, added receiver hitch, geared down the steering, etc)
Coot on Trailer.JPG

Showing the articulation. Right rear wheel up on a boulder:
Coot new tires -lowrez.jpg
 

John Mc

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From what I've heard and read, these were never used by the military, though a few were purchased for testing. A fair number were purchased by power line companies for power line monitoring. Most were used for recreation.
 

waayfast

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Looking at the coot articulated over the rock just reminded me about one thing I seem to remember about those machines. Seems like where the front half and back half came together was a potential pinch point for hands/fingers if you didn't keep clear.
 

John Mc

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Looking at the coot articulated over the rock just reminded me about one thing I seem to remember about those machines. Seems like where the front half and back half came together was a potential pinch point for hands/fingers if you didn't keep clear.
It certainly is. They could get away with that back when these were made. I'm not sure how they got away with it when they Made the Coot2, a more recently made successor to the original Coot.
 
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