Best for thinning WMO

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gimpyrobb

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Diesel.

Gas doesn't mix as well. It will be thicker on the bottom and thinner on the top.
 

gimpyrobb

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When mixed in a 55gal drum and used as fuel on trips, its is extremely noticeable. I don't know your experience, but I have done it many times.
 

dmetalmiki

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We use petrol mixed with deisel from wrong vehicle re-fueling, and top up that mix (mostly petrol) with waste ATF. (filtered down to 1 micron).
 

frank8003

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Current gasoline that one may buy is 10% or so ethanol which eats rubber (buna) o-rings.
There is a downside such as this when using gasoline fuel of any percentage.
 

dmetalmiki

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I use our mix in the deuces. 5 tons. including M62 wrecker. F350 Ambulance. Gamma Goat. used it for years. No problems. I put the success of our mix down to using the ATF which looks after the Fuel tanks, lines, pumps, injectors. And seems to definately give more bang for the buck. Also the multifuels run quieter and smoother on it. without the exess smoke that comes with W.M.O.
 
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dikwks

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One of the reasons I got the deuce was that it will burn anything. I had initially been looking for an old diesel pick up to try out "black diesel". Then I found out that a deuce engine was designed to anything from gas to fuel oil. What a great idea! Had to have one. I got the deuce, got infected with the green disease that so many here suffer from, and now I have a "straight" diesel 5 ton. I want to try a mix in it and so far the only downside I've seen is a possibility of coking the injectors up. I'm going to try it. Just waiting on warmer weather. Any problems will be easier to deal with once the weather is warmer as well as the fact that the mix will flow better.
 

Beyond Biodiesel

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I use gas. Haven't noticed any separation problems. I want to cut the oil's viscosity as much as possible.
I find blending gasoline with waste oils has many advantages. However, when blending any solvent with waste oils there is likely to be a precipitate, so it is always wise to get good at removing the light blend that floats above from the sediments that settle to the bottom. Otherwise there should be no separation of gasoline from a WMO blend.
Current gasoline that one may buy is 10% or so ethanol which eats rubber (buna) o-rings.
There is a downside such as this when using gasoline fuel of any percentage.
Yes, alcohol in gasoline can pose a problem with a blend; however, I have found if the gasoline content is at or below 30% in a waste oil blend, then there will be no damage to the hoses or seals. I have been running these blends on the same 6.2L diesel engine for 8 years.
 

reset2

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I agree with Beyond Biodiesel. Unless you centrifuge your oil the gasoline will make two distint layers in your oil. I currently use the 5 gallon bucket method to mix settle pour my black diesel. Mix at 4 gallon wmo and one gallon gasoline (gas in bucket first wmo on top to mix well) allow to settle for at least 2 weeks. As you pour off your bucket into another container you will be able to see the layers. At first it will be very thin like gas then progressiverly thicker as you approach the oil on the bottom (i guess about 3 times thicker). This lower thicker oil I put aside to purge out of the fuel. This thick oil has a lot of gunk and slime that you dont want to burn.
 

Beyond Biodiesel

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Yes, I agree, a centrifuge is essential equipment, especially when burning WMO, so that the sediments are removed efficiently. Otherwise it can literally take months of settling WMO blends to get all of the sediments out, because WMO's main problem is it is a colloid of soot and motor oil.

Soot is carbon, which is not much more dense than the motor oil, so it will stay in suspension indefinitely unless the colloid is broken by blending the WMO with a light solvent, such as gasoline, then allowed to settle for long periods of time, or centrifuged after a few weeks of settling.
 

John S-B

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Yes, I agree, a centrifuge is essential equipment, especially when burning WMO, so that the sediments are removed efficiently. Otherwise it can literally take months of settling WMO blends to get all of the sediments out, because WMO's main problem is it is a colloid of soot and motor oil.

Soot is carbon, which is not much more dense than the motor oil, so it will stay in suspension indefinitely unless the colloid is broken by blending the WMO with a light solvent, such as gasoline, then allowed to settle for long periods of time, or centrifuged after a few weeks of settling.
Good thing I'm so busy, I have a couple of drums of WMO that have been settling for about 8 months. I'll start filtering in May or June when it warms up. I've used old diesel and gas, a little fresh gas as well to thin it. Once it's run through the filters it should be decent. I'll probably mix it 50/50 with diesel so layering shouldn't be a problem.
 

Beyond Biodiesel

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I recently dismantled 5 dead DB-2 injector pumps from my 6.2L diesel engine, and found every one of them had a significant layer of ultra-fine particles adhering tenaciously to all of the metal surfaces inside of all of the IPs. Two IPs had broken shafts and the rest had warn out hydraulic heads presumably due to abrasion from these ultra-fine particles. Thus, I am now convinced that all waste oil blends should be centrifuged until all of the ultra-fine particles are removed prior to filtration, and pumping into the fuel tank of any diesel engine.
 

gimpyrobb

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While I agree with what you have posted, the money saved in fuel will buy MANY hydraulic heads or even complete injection pumps.
 

gunsgreg

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I apologize if this is a dumb question but is there any danger of the mix of gasoline with WVO in the combustion process? I had a diesel mechanic tell me to be cautious unless I wanted a hole in a piston? I am running a 8.3L Cummins.

For awhile everybody around town was fighting for WVO pickup but I guess lower fuel prices have made it easy for guys like us to cart off, I'm glad to do it...

Thanks for thread,
Greg
 
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