Coal-Tar Epoxy?

reeddavid

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Forestville WI
Wondering if anyone has any experience with the stuff. It is used in highly corrosive environments, and is relatively inexpensive.

Think it would make a great frame paint.
 
193
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16
Location
Adams NY
I've used it before, and it's not that great. It's impact resistant because it stays somewhat soft. Imagine what you would get if you mixed cheap undercoating with cheap black paint. That's pretty much it. You end up with a semi soft coating that dulls quickly in the sun, and transfers black to your hands after its dry. It's popular because it's cheap, and the people who use it generally require a lot of it.
 

grover26

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Seaford NY
Close to 40 years ago I applied it to the chassis of a truck I used for snow plowing. It held up well to road salt. and was still in good shape when truck was stolen from my property about ten years ago. I did do touch-up, as needed, over the years. I had the chassis sand blasted prior to application as clean, rust free metal is key to adhesion. I understand it is also used on buoys and steel boats used in salt water applications. As stated, I did this in the late 70's before many of the 'modern' coatings were available. I'm sure there are superior products now available, but it worked fine for me.
 

grover26

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Seaford NY
Thanks grover26! Can you attest to it never hardening and staying black? Did you prime at all?
I will attempt to recall my Coal-Tar Epoxy experience from four decades ago, which is at times, at my age, is easier than to recall four hours ago...lol: It was recommended to me by a friend who did underground tank installations. I had no prior knowledge of the product. I don't recall the manufacturer, but it wasn't one of the popular paint companies. It was a marine grade product. I applied by spray using a Binks #7 gun. A pressure feed gun may have been a better choice, as I wasn't able to get much of a pattern. As stated, metal was freshly sand blasted. I applied per manufacturers instruction of no primer...direct to metal. I don't recall any softness to the coating once cured...actually very hard. I can attest to it's hardness as I got some in my hair which the only solution was the cutting out of some clumps. Over time the rich black color did turn more of a dark gray (Hot Rod) primer color, but protection was never compromised. It took a number of years for the color to fade, as any 'paint' would in time. If appearance is a concern, a top coat of enamel or urethane could be applied.

My thoughts: Being it's still around in this age of 'miracle' coatings it must work. After all, it is an epoxy, which along with urethane, is the base of most of today's auto primers and top coats. This was my only experience using Coal-Tar Epoxy. Key to my success may be that it was a marine grade coating made for salt water exposure. If I can be of further help please feel free to write.
 

reeddavid

New member
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Location
Forestville WI
Thanks again! I am intrigued and am considering it. If I plan to do so, I will document it for all others.

Sent from my LG-K450 using Tapatalk
 
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