Cold Weather and CUCV's

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rmesgt

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What do you folks recommend to keep the engine of my 6.2 warm during the coming cold days? I was thinking about a heated dipstick which would keep the oil warm, but what about keeping the coolant warm as well? If both of areas were kept warm, I imagine my CUCV will start every time I turn the key. Thoughts??
 

SSGTUSMC

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Install a block heater.... Well worth the money and easy to install... Depending on how Cold it gets where you are I would Also use Winter fuel treatments and install battery warmers.... When I was in Maine that's what I did and worked wonders... Also a batter to trickle charger. I had all 3 plugged in on those cold winter nights... Another thing to check is make sure all glow plugs are operating as they should...

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

doghead

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When properly maintained, you should not need anything.

Heaters of all sorts have been discussed many times before. A little searching should find tons of ideas and conversations.
 

TGP (IL)

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The key here is being properly maintained.

Keep all the glow plugs working, keep good high CCA batteries, and fuel anti-gel.

My M1028A1 starts all winter long easily. Been as low as -25
I also use a winter front.

That being said a 110V block heater in one of the frost plugs also
Goes a long way.

Tom
 

LT67

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When properly maintained, you should not need anything.

Heaters of all sorts have been discussed many times before. A little searching should find tons of ideas and conversations.
What doghead said...

It's been single digit temps with a stiff wind and both of my m1008s' have never failed to start... it just takes a lil longer for the motor to build up heat.
 

dougco1

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What do you folks recommend to keep the engine of my 6.2 warm during the coming cold days?

I think its simple, just park it in a heated garage
 

cucvrus

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For the 20 years I had an M1028 as a daily driver I never did anything special. I maintained the system in stock configuration and drove it everyday. I installed a GM block heater and stayed away from oil heaters. I ued the block heater a few times. But 90% of the time I just started it. If it started hard I checked why and corrected it. Good Batteries and 100% operational fuel and glow plug system are key to smooth starts. The military didn't plug them in. And I seen them running around the base all winter long. Heard them coming 1/2 a mile away. Good Luck.
 
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dependable

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In my opinion it is good to have a block heater if used much below 20F. Yes, they will start a lower temps if things are working right. But cold starts are harder on everything than ones warmed even by an hour or two with block heater. If colder, the same applies, and one hopes everything is tip top every morning, all winter. And below 10F or so, not an option not to have one.

All you need to do is compare the sound of a very cold start engine to one that is heated. This goes for all the diesels I have run, not just the 6.2.
 

snowtrac nome

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When properly maintained, you should not need anything.

Heaters of all sorts have been discussed many times before. A little searching should find tons of ideas and conversations.
this is some of the best advice given. unless you expect temps below -30, the block heater is all you need. At warmer temps battery warmers cook batterys and shorten their lives ,and oil heaters cook the oil where there is contact , the block heater will warm the engine nice and evenly a good winter grade diesel or conditioner additive is necessary winter fronts look cool as did the insulation kits the military put out but with a good 205 degree thermostat that little 6.2 will generate all the heat you need and the winter front wont warm it any faster. I'm going on my 3rd winter with my lmtv and as of yet I haven't installed the block heater I bought its always started fine with just synthetic 5 w40 oil
 

cucvmule

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A lot of sage advice posted.

My 1008A1 starts better than my civi truck. And I maintain both well, overkill. Really if I plan to use the 82' truck and it is below 10 to 15 degrees I will plug in block heater on civi truck. In the winter I use 10w30 Shell Rotella motor oil. I believe that the oil pump when pumping cold oil is causing most of the additional load on the starter. I am surprised that the oil pump drive shaft doesn't break off some times when it is real cold. Next time you have an oil pump in your hands put the pickup in
a container of oil and take an oil pump driveshaft and rotate the shaft to feel the resistance.

The 1008A1 starts really well, because the 24 volt system wheels that starter around with authority.

As said when properly maintained the cold weather function of the CUCV is better than can be expected.

If you want to see a Cold weather Military CUCV find the TM's for or pictures of them stationed in Alaska. I seen some on auction and the special winter application of specialty systems will amaze you.
 
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cucvrus

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301winter cover.jpgI mulled this CUCV winter driving issue over for a while. The best plan of attack would be to park the CUCV for the winter. It has survived this long and does not like cold weather. Besides the salt and road chemicals being pounded into the seams and crevasses of the body. A few friends always say to me when they visit that Blazer your building would be great to drive in the winter. I look at them and say NO. The 2019 Silverado will be driven in the slop and salt. They will build a new one of them for me in 4 more years and the CUCV will be sitting pretty in my garage or some other CUCV lovers possession. That model is out of production for 29 years. I think the days of salt for the winter CUCV are over as long as I hold the title and the control of the keys. The new 2019 Silverado truck will be just fine on that assignment. Have a Great Day. Be Safe. Winters coming. Are you ready for it? It's waiting right around the corner for all of us. Ready or NOT here It comes.
 
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rmesgt

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Grove, Oklahoma
Thank you all for the advice. I can see there is a wide and varied range of opinions on this issue. I believe that I will get the fuel additive and try to locate a "Block Heater" and get that installed. Past that, I suppose it is keeping up with the maintenance...
 

LT67

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FWIW it was 30 degrees in the morning last weekend and the heater in the M1008 about roasted me out of the truck lol
 
There is no temp (experience down to 50 below with my daily driver CUCV and 70 below with my gas old international truck) that you can't start outside. Got transmission, block, oil pan, and battery heaters and 24 volt trickle charger. 5w - 30w oil. Put a quilt type junk blanket over the engine. Bring battery in house for night. I try not to use them if cold but sometimes you need to. All just a matter of how much you want to invest in time and electricity. 20 below it'll start every time with just the glow plugs but if I got time I plug it in below 0. Stan
 

Icorps1970

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First define cold. I sometimes can get to -30/-40 where I live but under -30 is rare. Frost plug heater, Amsoil 0w40/5w40/10W30 Synthetic Diesel oil. Run Synthetic EP gear oil in the diffs and Dexron 6 in anyplace that needs ATF.
In AK they had frost plug heaters, oil pan heaters, battery heaters. But TRUE Synthetic oils make a huge difference and will even reduce strain on the starter, I think you can buy Mobil 1 Diesel oil in Walmart. Since it has roller lifters there high zinc level oil is not required so even "modern" diesel oils are OK. Synthetics, Amsoil anyway and increasingly Mobil 1, will reduce engine wear at all temperatures from cold to over heated engine (the engine will likely quit from other causes before the oil fails), will keep the internals cleaner, reduce oil consumption allow extending the drain intervals and give better protection in storage. Use a quality oil filter. Mobil 1, Amsoil or Napa Gold or better.
0w40 has a -54F pour point. 10w30 has -44F even the 15w40 has a -40 pour point. You can find complete info on their oils Amsoil's web site. I have been running 0w40 in my CUCV.
A more fluid oil bypasses the filter less when the engine is cold so less unfiltered oil goes to the bearings. Also oil analysis shows that metal in the oil peaks after every oil change since its basically a dry start.
Sorry if this sounds like an Amsoil commercial but I have been using it for a long time and believe in it.
 

Icorps1970

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And if you live in an area with salt or other ice melters on the roads only drive it when the roads are dry. Where I live its not common. But there is one road in the area that gets sprayed year round with, I believe, Calcium Chloride. Which is going to at best hold moisture on the metal parts. They use similar liquids for clearing ice from road ways here. So when its wet in winter from deicing I avoid driving the CUCV and hate driving anything on the crap but must.... And the wife drives a mountain pass 5 days a week to work....
 

ssdvc

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I do minimize driving on the New England roads in the winter in an attempt to prevent/slow/minimize rust forming. That said, I spray the underside of my 1009 every other year with Fluid Film. Seems to work great.
 
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