Commercial license required for the MTVR?

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Elijah95

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Wes is correct, for example the weight alone of the truck with air brakes qualifies it but some folks can sneak under the radar running it as an RV but end up in trouble if they use it like an actual truck.

I have my CDL, and if you’re not interested in obtaining a commercial CDL look at obtaining a non-commercial CDL meaning Not For Hire or Gain.
 

fasttruck

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The idea is to avoid a commercial registration. Go with RV, historical, antique, farm use or whatever you can get. With a commercial registration a whole host of annoying compliances kick in: USDOT #, DOT physical and drug screen, logging or accounting for time, fuel tax accounting just to name a few. DOT means "death on truckers" and government's theory is if you are making money they have the right to regulate you to death and confiscate most of your earnings through a wide range of taxes and fees.
 

JonM934

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I have done a lot of research on this and although the laws vary from state to state, there are Federal laws that say anything over 26,000 GVWR a CDL is required. So if you comply with your state laws but then drive across a state border, it is possible that you could be pulled over by a HP officer enforcing Federal law. The same is true of RVs actually. But I think that HP officers rarely pull over an RV even if it weighs more than 26,000. And, with a big truck like these, some states require that you pull into the weigh/check stations. Then they might ask for your CDL. You might get away with telling them that it is a personal vehicle but they can see that it is over 26,000 and they could cite you.

BTW, at any time, HP officiers can inspect your vehicle for safety violations.
 

NDT

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What has worked out fine for me in TX for over 10 years and multiple LEO stops: I have Class A CDL with medical and drug screen, truck has USDOT and TXDMV registration with Former Military Plates (which is a form of antique registration). This is on a 915 which is same thing weight wise.
 

Nomadic

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Wes is correct, for example the weight alone of the truck with air brakes qualifies it but some folks can sneak under the radar running it as an RV but end up in trouble if they use it like an actual truck.

I have my CDL, and if you’re not interested in obtaining a commercial CDL look at obtaining a non-commercial CDL meaning Not For Hire or Gain.
That is the information I found when doing the research. The non-commercial license needed to drive the truck is a Class-B.
 

JonM934

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I forgot to mention it but that is what I found after asking Utah DMV and Highway Patrol. DMV was not so sure, but HP told me a Class B is required.
 

Elijah95

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That is the information I found when doing the research. The non-commercial license needed to drive the truck is a Class-B.
Yes sir, but I strongly recommend a class A to fully utilize the truck with a heavy trailer


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

chucky

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Doctors and lawyers buy 45 to 55 thousand pound PREVOST motorhomes with air brakes every day and jump in the seat with a class D operator lic and drive all over the country pulling big car hauler trailers and never get looked at because they are not IN THE COMISSION OF ENTERPRISE.
 

MTVR

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Doctors and lawyers buy 45 to 55 thousand pound PREVOST motorhomes with air brakes every day and jump in the seat with a class D operator lic and drive all over the country pulling big car hauler trailers and never get looked at because they are not IN THE COMISSION OF ENTERPRISE.
Bingo...
 

zebedee

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.. 45 to 55 thousand pound PREVOST motorhomes with air brakes every day and jump in the seat with a class D operator lic and drive all over the country pulling big car hauler trailers and never get looked at...
... and you know why? The AARP has too big a loby therefore wrinckleys will always be exempt.
There are at least 52 answers to this question, multiply by the number of other states you want to drive in, less the number of exemptions your state has as fasttruck said in post #6.

It's your a$$, so do the hard work (some of you will know who this quote comes from), get informed from your state DoT office, the FMCSA and stop asking for opinions or good luck stories from people who are not in official capacity (I'll stand corrected if any SS members are DoT certified troopers etc).

If you want to sit on the side of the road and argue that you don't kneed a CDL with a fresh grad non DoT officer, go ahead. Or wait until the correct person can clarify... good luck. I got my CDL-A (manual trans) + endorsements I want, BUT use the exemptions - farm, non commercial, historic as necessary to avoid all the paperwork etc.

If you want a CDL - you have 2 years from Feb this year, to get it yourself using a friends vehicle without having to go to an official truck driving school. From 2022 you will have to go to an approved school that will, by then, have to have a minimum requirement curriculum. Let's see how school fees escalate at that point.
You have spent $1000's on buying a toy - if it's not a toy and you want to work it, you are on real thin ice not to have a CDL. If you have a CDL … AND a toy, you CAN put it to work down the road when a neighbour needs a favour.

Blast my post if you want to - it's not an opinion.
 
Last edited:

simp5782

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A MTVR is not a motor home. Some states require non commercial CDLs (GA, SC,AR) to operate any vehicle over 26000lb. Some states like MS and TN actually state the weight and the phrase "engaged in intrastate or interstate commerce" or profiteering. Others do not and strictly mean weight.

PA wants a medical card for anyone over 10,001lb and a CDL for a pickup truck towing a flatbed trailer regardless of their personal reasons, folks visiting Chambersburg have found out the hard way.
 

simp5782

My safe word is Pork and Beans.
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I am planning to convert my MTVR into a motorhome, which does not require a CDL in my state, regardless of GVWR.
Like I said you can go that route. However if you ever receive a citation for some odd ball reason they will revert back to the vehicles original purpose. I have handled cases in different jurisdictions and states regarding ordinances, registration, etc. Every judge has dissented that the vehicles are military by nature and are not to be used by civilians for consumer purposes.

This included even a 927 camper built by member profo, complete restructure and fabrication nicer than a Hilton hotel room. Registered in a state as a recreational vehicle and completed inspection as a recreational vehicle by the state police. A judge ruled that it still could not be a camper

You may be an ex DOT officer or whatever, if that is the case then you know there are certain officers that will interpret it how they want. If you are then it should be an easy thing to acquire a CDL. Every actual CMV trooper in TN i know personally has one.


We have a law in Tennessee that states that all surplus military vehicles are historic military trucks if kept in their true appearance regardless of their appearance and weight. 4 different circuit courts have ruled that they are commercial vehicles due to their size and original intended purpose (i.e. m915 m931 m916s) since they are tractors even though the person simply uses them for parade use.

Judges have their own agendas and interpretation and can simply choose to impose the law as they want or believe it should be. Just saying it is a fine line to walk on being on this side of the law.

I have driven military trucks lots of miles, been involved in accidents in these trucks some even resulting in deaths of occupants and other drivers. Every legal issue coming from those incidents have looked at the vehicle in question and if it should have been on the road or not and the qualifications of the operator.

I am not going to argue with a newbie who may see his truck in the next 3 to 6 months and then they have to figure it out everything about it. And I guess technically can't even drive it unless they put a quadcon on it with a cot in it. May be a gray area. Then again it may not to the driver. But like I said, you are on this side of the law now and it just takes that one PITA to make it a rough day.
 

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