Crimp tool and mods for packard connectors

Steel Soldiers is supported by:

lino

Member
148
0
16
Location
Wake Forest, NC
Hey All,

I found several threads (from circa '08 ) on how to crimp the standard connectors (that we call Packard) on deuces, but I haven't found much lately.
Also, a simple mod that I made to my crimp tool made it much easier to use, so I thought I'd post a summary.

First of all, the connectors in kit form are available from Erik's like this: http://www.eriksmilitarysurplus.com/rushcoq10ms.html, or they can be found on ebay as well. (I found Erik's to be cheapest).
Please note that there are different part numbers for each size of wire.
IMG_2061.jpg

The inserts look like this on the connection end:
IMG_2065.jpg

And like this on the wire end:
IMG_2069.jpg

The crimp tool is known as an AF-8 (among other names). It's made by several manufacturers.
IMG_2062.jpgIMG_2063.jpg
The full part number is M22520/1-01
That final -01 is important. It determines the wire size range of the crimp tool. The proper range is 12-26 ga wire. The -02 goes to higher numbers (smaller wire).
And a closeup of the selector (of the proper size)
IMG_2060.jpg
Ebay is a good source for these. New they are very expensive.

There is also a dazzling number of postioner and turret options, that can be extremely confusing (and spendy). The short answer is that you don't need either one. And, unless you are rewiring a complete truck, you probably don't even want one.
They fit onto the back of the tool (same side as the wire size selector) and allow you to drop your insert in and the positioner holds it at the right height for the crimp fingers to act in the right place on the insert. Turrets allow you to select more than one type or size of insert without removing the positioner.

It turns out that your hands and eyes working together can do an equally good job. So unless you are making hundreds of connections and want to save a total of about 5 minutes while doing so, I'd advise against a positioner.

Here's what happens to the insert when you squeeze the lever:
IMG_2070.jpg

Now, I also found in old threads, that folks needed to remove the ring on the connector (see right side of second pic) in order to fit it thru the hole in the crimp tool. Some had made jigs to help with the removal. The ring then had to be re-installed after crimping (this ring is on the connection side of the insert, not the crimp side).

I had the same issue, but I also found that the male inserts didn't quite fit in the crimp tool either (a much bigger issue).
They were really close. Some fit, some didn't.

So I measured every insert I had, and the largest ones were .221 diameter. The hole thru the crimp tool was about .220.

Since I just got it and wasn't that attached to it yet, I figured it was time to "fix" the crimp tool...

There is a wire drill sized at .221 (#2), but I wanted a little space, so I grabbed the #1 bit (.228 diameter), put it in my hand drill, took a deep breath, and...

...drilled out the center of the crimp tool.

It's hard steel, but with patience and care (and a sharp bit), it was easy to do. BE SURE THE HANDLE IS OPEN, or you will cut off the fingers and destroy your crimp tool.
Looking at the fingers on mine, there is no evidence that the drill bit touched them.

All connectors that I have (you saw my stash of them in the first pic) now fit easily thru the tool. Crimps on 16ga presotlite wire pass the "pull really hard" test.

Hope that helps.

ciao
lino
 

Suprman

Well-known member
Supporting Vendor
6,709
90
48
Location
Stratford/Connecticut
I found a small automotive terminal crimper works well for the female connectors. A good snapon or like. Not the thin universal ones with screw cutters. The aero crimper is a must for the male ones.
 

sigo

Lieutenant Colonel
Steel Soldiers Supporter
1,586
35
48
Location
Leavenworth, KS / Saudi Arabia
Great write up. This is what tutorials on SS should look like.

I wish I had seen this years ago before I figured it all out. Of course I'm still learning, I might try taking a little material out of the center so the female connector fits. Good tip!

I purchased a "used" AF-8 in a nice case, with a few included tools and a positioner for maybe $50. It was advertised as used but if it had been used you couldn't prove it. Still had a coat of oil on everything. I don't remember where I found it, but the deals are out there.
 

lino

Member
148
0
16
Location
Wake Forest, NC

Plugugly

New member
116
0
0
Location
Iowa
What's not clear however is what size the hole for the connector is. If it's too small, you could be out $32.
It says 12-20awg in the description, I would think the connectors would be close but it's hard to say without knowing what it's for. The description also lists Caterpillar and Harley Davidson mechanics, maybe one of those will chime in.

I bought a used AF-8 for $50 because I wasn't sure if it was worth the effort to sleuth this one out.
 

frank8003

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
4,420
607
113
Location
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
I went back and did read the other threads about crimping, Daniels AF-8, Douglas, Packard, and Bendix connectors and sets. I must reconnect a lot of these this summer. I know I need tools/connectors.
Also, attached is from PS magazine #372 which adds to my confusion.
I can not get them to stay landscape, so download then open and turn.

View attachment connectors 1.pdf View attachment connectors 2.pdf
 

Dieseljeeper

New member
20
1
3
Location
Spanaway, wa
There is another crimping tool for DIN terminals sold by Cat that has a depth adjustment. New they are $132, I purchased mine from a pawn shop in the box for $35
 

aleigh

Active member
1,022
9
38
Location
Phoenix, AZ & Seattle, WA
I know this is an ancient thread, but, a couple notes that maybe are helpful. OP mentions that you can manually align the contact in the AF8 frame to avoid having to purchase a specific turret head. This is true, but, DMC produces a generic turret head UH2-5 for prototype work. It has a long thumb screw and a set nut that allows you to set the depth to any arbitrary amount. It is intended to be used when developing connectors (where a real turret head has not been designed yet), but it's perfectly acceptable for low volume work like this. I use mine for all kinds of things including non-standard connectors like powerpoles.

OP illustrates round-entrance contacts, where the wire-end is a full circle, but it is also common to run into MS2711? series contacts which are fold-over. These are properly crimped with a DMX HX4 tool frame (the gold one, not the blue AF8 OP demonstrates) and, depending on gauge, a set of dies. The proper dies for MS27144-2 fold-overs is Y627S.
 

just me

Member
322
6
18
Location
phoenix,az
I simply use the same crimper for the Douglass connectors that I have. Never had a crimp failure in many hundred ends installed. I do however have the correct crimps for Duetch and Weatherpack connectors. I've never found a suitable substitute for them.
 

Wire Fox

Well-known member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
1,239
86
48
Location
Indianapolis, Indiana
Wish I saw this thread 6 months ago. Installed a lot of these connectors using a functional, but awkward hydraulic crimping tool. Since I still have another 20 or so connector in my foreseeable future, I'll probably snag one of these up...
 

papakb

Well-known member
1,600
163
63
Location
San Jose, Ca
Daniels is just one manufacturer of suitable tools for these connectors. Buchanan is another popular manufacturer and are usually a lot cheaper on the surplus marked. Glenair is another. And if you really want to go all out you can go Deutsch.
 
Last edited:

Ajax MD

Well-known member
964
349
63
Location
Mayo, MD
Sorry to dredge up an old thread.

The AF crimper is a total circle. How do you remove the tool from the wire once you've crimped a Packard connector to it? It seems to me that the tool is now trapped on the wire. What am I missing?
 

Suprman

Well-known member
Supporting Vendor
6,709
90
48
Location
Stratford/Connecticut
Once you crimp all the way down it releases and the tool should be open and ready to do the next crimp. Depending on what setting you have it on you may be crimping too deep. You may have to really squeeze it to fully cycle it and then set to a lighter crimp.
 

3jacks

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
153
33
28
Location
Near Jackson, MO
If you only have a few packard connections to make and don’t want to spend a bunch on a tool, I used this and it worked quite well. Round hole at bottom for female connectors and the arrow for males. It leaves a little “wing” but fits inside the plastic insert in the male connector. All survived a healthy pull test. $10. I don’t recommend the arrow’d part of the tool for the female connectors...it crimps onto the stud a little which deforms the stud.

in a pinch or for a few connectors, this does a serviceable job.
 

Attachments

Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks