Detroit Diesel

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NEIOWA

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Not an ideal spot for my question so might be close.

My Vol FD has a 1985 Ford L8000 engine (pumper). Power is a 6I71. Truck has about 20000mi and low hours.

We have a couple know lots young guys who know diddly about any engine built before 2000. Shortage of old experienced 2cycle Detroit guys here (and everywhere apparently). Their kneejerk answer is junk it. Well there are no $ to replace it.

We are finding fuel in the oil pan. Are there typical areas/problems to look for?
 

NDT

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Oh no don’t junk it. Fuel system on Detroits is super simple, a gear fuel pump driven from an accessory drive and 6 unit injectors actuated by rockers from the cam under the valve cover. Either must be leaking into the engine. Pull the valve cover and run it and see if you see fuel leaking.
 

snowtrac nome

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I'm old enough to like the old road oilers to but as far as the l9000 goes get rid of it I have one in our fleet they are hard as he double tooth pick to find parts for some of the steering parts are just not available.
 

anmlcrkr

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Not an ideal spot for my question so might be close.

My Vol FD has a 1985 Ford L8000 engine (pumper). Power is a 6I71. Truck has about 20000mi and low hours.

We have a couple know lots young guys who know diddly about any engine built before 2000. Shortage of old experienced 2cycle Detroit guys here (and everywhere apparently). Their kneejerk answer is junk it. Well there are no $ to replace it.

We are finding fuel in the oil pan. Are there typical areas/problems to look for?
The Detroit Diesel mechanic that taught me in 1971 said the very 1st place to look for the cause of "making oil" is the fuel lines under the rocker cover that couple each injector to the fuel rails.
I would assume the fuel pump could leak also so that would be the second place I would look.

Larry Brandon
 

Hummermark

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Hi to find leaks on the Sherman/m10 6046 engines I do what the manual says which is with fuel in the engine fuel system ie it has run,pressure the engine fuel system to 60psi with shop air line and look for leaks.
This works well has shown leaks on filter housing that were dry when running .
You need to block of the fuel return line when doing this.
I always do this when I rebuild the two 6-71s
 

wayne461

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With the valve cover off, tap each line with a wrench. You should hear a sharp ringing sound. If you hear a dull sound the lines need a be loosened and re torqued. Fuel contamination in the oil is the death of a Detroit.
 
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