Deuce clutch replacement

Steel Soldiers is supported by:

Barrman

Well-known member
4,361
43
48
Location
Giddings, Texas
RE: duece clutch replacement

Just to clue you in. Once you get all the stuff in place and actually move the transmission out of the way, it will be one of the easiest clutch changes you have ever done.

The last and first one I did took a little over an hour to get the transmission on the ground starting with a running truck. We used a chain hoist on a pipe resting on the cowl and cab back to pick it up. The truck was being parted out so we didn't care about scratching anything. Even with that, we didn't bend, break or scratch anything.
 

serp

New member
77
0
0
Location
new providence nj
RE: duece clutch replacement

i just did my clutch and rear seal . i used an engine hoist and put it in pass. door.lowered trans onto dolly and wheeled it out from under truck. i found if you un bolt front drive shaft from transfer case and swing it out of the way you get much more room. espcially if you have a winch. with cluth out you may want to do rear seal. get a new one from napa. not an old surplus one.
 

Jones

New member
2,215
4
0
Location
Sacramento, California
I cheated with Bjorn's rear main job. I marked the flywheel to crank location (one bolt hole is about a 1/16th off to keep crank/flywheel balance)-- made an 8" long dowel pin that screws into one of the flywheel bolt holes and that lets you slide the flywheel out of the bellhousing so you can get a better grip on it and not end up with it in your lap-- small wood blocks to wedge between the the clutch fingers and the pressure plate housing so you don't have to suck the pressure plate down using the pressure plate bolts-- and an aligning tool to make sure everything was lined up for the input shaft.
Can't claim the ideas; they all came out of the TM... but they sure made the job a snap.
 

Recovry4x4

LLM/Member 785
Super Moderator
Steel Soldiers Supporter
33,405
246
63
Location
GA Mountains
I'm lucky enough to have the military tranny hoist that sits on the floor of the truck. Pretty cool design. A whlile back I had to replace the tranny in the tractor and used the hoist. It was neary impossible to get the thing in a position where it would work. I finally got tired of trying and dropped the tranny back out and used the engine hoist through the right door. Went in in 5 minutes after that.
 

ARMYMAN30YearsPlus

In Memorial
In Memorial
3,591
4
0
Location
Parkville, MD
When you talk of going through the right door are you removing panels or what has to come off? I am thinking a transmission jack would work if it had the reach wouldn't it? I hope my clutch stays good for some time. It held good towing the dolly and M 127
 

devilman96

New member
2,061
10
0
Location
Boca Raton, FL
A tranny jack makes a nightmare of the situation, balancing the transmission and being able to yank and pull on it like you need to is near impossible.

Pulling the center cover of the floor and going through the passenger door with a engine hoist is the way to go. You can use a 2x4 across the dash and rear of the cab with a come a'long but if it breaks or slips "ouch" wouldn't quite cover what it is going to do to you or the transmission when it hits the ground.

Other than the parts being heavy as all get out the job is easier than doing a civy pick up truck.... Just make sure you have all of the parts you need before starting the job, clutch, PP, throw out, pilot bearing, rear main seal, etc. Check your PTO, rear trans output and transfer case seals before ordering anything to spare yourself some grief.
 

Recovry4x4

LLM/Member 785
Super Moderator
Steel Soldiers Supporter
33,405
246
63
Location
GA Mountains
As Mike says, the far and away easiest way is from the top. Remove the floor pan and got to work. Alot of the stuff can be reached from the top without wearing out your back. Either way you will have to remove the floor pan because the shift tower comes up through the pan.
 

icecreamman

New member
158
0
0
Location
Huntsville,al.
Reading up on the clutch/rear main job staring me in the face. On post #6, It's suggested making two studs 8" long the same diameter and thread as the flywheel/crank bolts. Could someone tell me what the diameter and thread pitch is so I can fabricate these before starting this task?


Thanks in advance
 

rosco

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
2,103
12
38
Location
Delta Junction, Alaska
I don't remember, but its not a special thread. No doubt fine thread "NF", and if I had to guess, its 7/16, or 3/8, but maybe 1/2". The 8" part is harder to find. I used that trick, but already had something that would work. Just cut the head off a bolt, and your off & running.
 

Jeepsinker

Active member
5,188
24
38
Location
Dry Creek, Louisiana
It really isn't necessary if you have the trans out, so you have room to work. Harder to get the heavy flywheel lined up and stabbed onto two 8" long studs than it is to wrestle it up into the bellhousing and then up onto the pilot on the crank.
 
355
4
18
Location
Prescott, AZ
I cheated with Bjorn's rear main job. I marked the flywheel to crank location (one bolt hole is about a 1/16th off to keep crank/flywheel balance)-- made an 8" long dowel pin that screws into one of the flywheel bolt holes and that lets you slide the flywheel out of the bellhousing so you can get a better grip on it and not end up with it in your lap-- small wood blocks to wedge between the the clutch fingers and the pressure plate housing so you don't have to suck the pressure plate down using the pressure plate bolts-- and an aligning tool to make sure everything was lined up for the input shaft.
Can't claim the ideas; they all came out of the TM... but they sure made the job a snap.
I finally got the transmission out of the way, and I am now staring at the clutch assembly. Does anyone have an idea what the dimensions should be for the "small wood blocks" that are used to wedge between the clutch fingers and the pressure plate housing?
 

fpchief

Active member
Steel Soldiers Supporter
702
27
28
Location
Bay Minette, Al.
I finally got the transmission out of the way, and I am now staring at the clutch assembly. Does anyone have an idea what the dimensions should be for the "small wood blocks" that are used to wedge between the clutch fingers and the pressure plate housing?
If I am remembering correctly, it is pieces just big enough to jamb in the fingers to keep them from springing all the way out as you unbolt it.
 
355
4
18
Location
Prescott, AZ
I could not push or pry the clutch fingers down to insert a block of wood, so I just removed every other bolt, then I removed the rest of the bolts loosening them alternating across the clutch until I had them all out. I had the clutch assembly out on about a half hour.

I found the flywheel was badly cracked from over heating due to the slipping clutch. So, now I need a flywheel, if anyone knows where I can get one.
 

gringeltaube

Staff Member
Super Moderator
Moderator
Steel Soldiers Supporter
5,970
146
63
Location
Montevideo/Uruguay
I could not push or pry the clutch fingers down to insert a block of wood........
....
You don't have to...! Actually, any small wedge-shaped wood pieces will work. Just fit them in there loosely while the bolts are still tightened. Once you start unscrewing, the wedges will prevent the fingers from raising, thus absorbing/releasing all tension out of the assembly. That way the eight bolts all come out easily, with no risk of distortion of the clutch case.
 

rustystud

Well-known member
8,487
103
48
Location
Woodinville, Washington
I could not push or pry the clutch fingers down to insert a block of wood, so I just removed every other bolt, then I removed the rest of the bolts loosening them alternating across the clutch until I had them all out. I had the clutch assembly out on about a half hour.

I found the flywheel was badly cracked from over heating due to the slipping clutch. So, now I need a flywheel, if anyone knows where I can get one.
Heat cracks are quite common on most all diesel engine flywheels. Most can be ground out when the flywheel is resurfaced.
 
355
4
18
Location
Prescott, AZ
Heat cracks are quite common on most all diesel engine flywheels. Most can be ground out when the flywheel is resurfaced.
Thanks, Rusty. I had a friend who is retired master mechanic examine it, and in his opinion there are many cracks, and some of them are quite deep, so it should be replaced. His assessment seems reasonable to me.
 
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website like our supporting vendors. Their ads help keep Steel Soldiers going. Please consider disabling your ad blockers for the site. Thanks!

I've Disabled AdBlock
No Thanks