DIY Brake drum puller

Reworked LMTV

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My truck came from a snow / salt region. Thus, my drums are seized. Here is my removal device. Made it with a Harbor Freight engine stand I had and a bottle jack. Chains rated at 11k # x 4. Hooks (rated at 10k #)came from HF too. IMG_1959.jpgIMG_1961.jpgIMG_1964.jpg
This tool require reinforcement at the 4 swing out arms, as they will bend. Weld in something thick.
 
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topo

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I have never taken the drums off of a LMTV but it looks like you have to pull the drum with the hub and then take the drum off the back side ? Good pictures and watch your fingers this stuff is heavy and likes to pinch .
 

DiverDarrell

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I have never taken the drums off of a LMTV but it looks like you have to pull the drum with the hub and then take the drum off the back side ? Good pictures and watch your fingers this stuff is heavy and likes to pinch .
nope just remove the rim and the drum can come off. I’ve pulled mine off all 4 corners. Also backing off the star nut adjuster on the brakes sometimes is needed as well
 

Reworked LMTV

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IMG_1965.jpgIMG_1966.jpgIMG_1967.jpgIMG_1971.jpgIMG_1973.jpgIMG_1975.jpg

Mil spec 20# sledge proved handy. Seals were in ok shape, but less flexible, so I replaced them. There are 2 in each hub for the CTIS. There is a third seal at the base of the hub, which I opted not to replace. I used my 3 and 7/8" socket to drive the seals lightly with a 5# sledge. Does the rear bearing get grease around the shaft where it sits?
 
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Reworked LMTV

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IMG_1953.jpg IMG_1951.jpg

This is the second tool that I developed for repacking the bearings and replacing the seals. While the tub is nothing special, and they have them for semi-trucks, the challenge is using them on FMTV wheels. Semi's have concave wheels, which act as support for the tub. Ours are convex. I used rare earth neodymium magnets (1/4" x 3/4") to apply a strong bond between the edge of the tub and the wheel. The magnets were attached with hot glue, but I would recommend epoxy like jb weld instead to lift the magnets up, maybe 3/8". Run a bead of caulk along the round lip to create a seal between the tub and the wheel.
 
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DiverDarrell

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Did you pull and grease the inner bearing, and how did its greas seal look, the one that’s closest to the engine on the spindle. I know these seals don’t always come off with the hub when you pull it. My first hub was quite intimidating at first, and then found easier than expected, especially with the proper ctis seal driver. Good job on your fix. The next one will be a snap.
 

Reworked LMTV

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Did you pull and grease the inner bearing, and how did its greas seal look, the one that’s closest to the engine on the spindle. I know these seals don’t always come off with the hub when you pull it. My first hub was quite intimidating at first, and then found easier than expected, especially with the proper ctis seal driver. Good job on your fix. The next one will be a snap.
No, I did not pull the seal closest to the engine on the spindle. Seemed in good shape, but I still could, since the hub is not back on yet. Is this one CTIS too? You can see the seal that I did not pull in the second picture. Is this the same size as the other seals on the spindle?
 
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DiverDarrell

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The inner most seal is the grease seal for the inner bearing(don’t forget to load the bearing with new grease, only the outer bearing is oil bath for the front axle.) the other two identical seals are the ctis seal. I think the hub goes on easier and cleaner when you can install it all as one set, that way you know the grease seal is seated properly on the hub. I greased the crap out of the spindle on reassembly to ensure new seals were lubed good. No faster way to melt them on first run than to forget the lube. Grease on the oil side is washed out by the oil so no worries there. Follow the tm on setting the bearing preload and only tighten while turning the hub. I usually do the tighten loosen process a few times to ensure everything is seated correctly before going to the lighter final torque.
 

Reworked LMTV

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Does anyone know the engineering reason why these hubs have a greased portion in the bearing and then a 80/90 w gear oil bath in the planetaries? Seems like the oil would flush out the grease. This is actually what I found. Doesn't make sense at this point:shrugs::shrugs::shrugs:
 

DiverDarrell

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CTIS seals block oil passage to the inner bearing keeps only dry air going into the tires.. That’s why the inner have to be greased as there is no way to get oil to them. If yours were oil washed then you have failed ctis seals. One easy check is if you have oil coming out of the hollow wheel stud the seals have failed, second easy check is a puddle of oil under your tire when both ctis and the grease seal fail, which is really fun because it leaks on your brakes first.
 

Reworked LMTV

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CTIS seals block oil passage to the inner bearing keeps only dry air going into the tires.. That’s why the inner have to be greased as there is no way to get oil to them. If yours were oil washed then you have failed ctis seals. One easy check is if you have oil coming out of the hollow wheel stud the seals have failed, second easy check is a puddle of oil under your tire when both ctis and the grease seal fail, which is really fun because it leaks on your brakes first.
Gotcha, but why is the outer bearing allowed to get oil splashed on it that takes the grease off? Engineering theory I suppose.
 

DiverDarrell

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You don’t need to grease the outer one it’s oil bath. The outer one is oil bathed because of its location. The hub gear reduction requires an oil over grease to keep things lubed. Adding in a seal to separate the bearing from the gears was not worth the cost. Just like the engineering and additional machining to het the inner bearing to be oil bath as well. Either way grease or oil doesn’t make much difference as either requires maintenance With the hub.
 
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