Does anyone make their own Bio-Diesel???

Steel Soldiers is supported by:

a68cudas

New member
163
0
0
Was curious if any members here make their own Bio-Diesel fuel? How hard is it to make? Any Recipes? How does it run compared to straight diesel? :?:
 

gimpyrobb

dumpsterlandingfromorbit!
27,633
157
63
I got some b10 or 15 while out in Il. Truck seemed to like it. Since I can run wmo, I don't bother with the hassle of measuring the ph and cleaning the materials to make bio. Too much un-needed effort. (for me)
 

MikeON

New member
130
0
0
I've been making small quantities of bio-diesel to run in my sawmill and tractor. I have run it straight (B100) in them and they have run fine. I can get all the relatively clean waste cooking oil (WVO) I could ever use. This iswith a homemade processor using 5 gallon buckets. Have put small quantities in the deuce because biodiesel is supposed to be an excellent fuel pump/injector lube.

Was thinking of trying centrifuging then blending the WVO with kero or gasoline for the deuce because it would be a lot less hassle than making bio. Plus the yield would be a little higher - with bio you add methanol but lose about the same proportion in glycerin.

I think Bjorn uses biodiesel regularly in his trucks.
 

73m819

Rock = older than dirt , GA. MAFIA , Dirty
12,212
251
0
talk to BJORN, (cranetruck), he is the bio KING
 

southdave

New member
1,992
2
0
I got some b10 or 15 while out in Il. Truck seemed to like it. Since I can run wmo, I don't bother with the hassle of measuring the ph and cleaning the materials to make bio. Too much un-needed effort. (for me)
I am with gimp here I tried it when diesel was outragous It seem like I had about 12hr into the first batch had a 85 300td it got about 30% less milage out of bio D- mot to mention the waste and coking problems. Wmo is the way to go
 

gimpyrobb

dumpsterlandingfromorbit!
27,633
157
63
Southdave and my post are also geared towadr the deuce. You have not told us what you intend on running this in, so we can only post "what we know".
 

Katahdin

Active member
1,294
7
36
My first deuce is arriving next week, so I can't comment on how it runs yet but I imagine it'll work fine provided the biodiesel has low water content and you're running it above gel temperatures.

I built a Apple Seed processor when home oil prices when sky high and used B10-60 in my home boiler for awhile. Working with methanol however scares the s*** out of me so I probably won't try it again until I get a air supplied respirator. Personally I'd like to skip the process and run a mix WVO and dino diesel/gas instead.

I suggest checking out this Biodiesel Tutorial for more information.
 

jakwi

New member
68
0
0
I know I'm a bit late to this thread, but my m1009 runs great on it, I've only run about b50 thus far, but it's cold in Colorado. All of the concerns about bio negatively affecting motors can be addressed by quality control on the fabrication of bio, and filtering. There is a wealth of info about this topc over on the infopop biodiesel forum. [thumbzup]

IMHO the 6.2 is an excellent candidate for using bio. as with any of the older diesels. Newer diesel will also run fine but filtering and quality control become even more important.

Due to the emissions controls implemented after 2007 bio won't work well in diesels made after that date.
 

wreckerman893

Possum Connoisseur
15,298
543
36
Just remember that BioD is VERY astringent....it will clean your fuel tank and entire system out....and all the crud will end up in the fuel filters....you will change them several times in a short period of time.
My buddy made his own for a while (and then went to straight Veggie)......he cut the first filter he took off in half and it looked like it was full of tar.
Some people report that the rubber fuel lines go bad fast with BioD......I have no experience to prove or refute that.
 

Katahdin

Active member
1,294
7
36
The methanol in biodiesel is what dislodges the tank crud and breaks down the rubber fuel lines. Typically biodiesel is about 20% methanol.
 

jakwi

New member
68
0
0
Katadin,
Properly made biodiesel has no methanol in it. The washing process removes the methanol and lye from the finished
product. In fact if you look at a bottle of yellow Heet (100% methanol) it says not for diesel motors. I'm pretty sure methanol causes detonation in diesels.

Biodiesel on it's own is a great solvent and does indeed clean out all the crud in your fuel system. It will definately clog a couple of fuel filters if used on an older vehicle, but once the crud is cleaned out you won't have any more fuel filter problems. unless you make bad fuel.

It will eventually deteriorate your rubber fuel lines, but they probably need replacing anyway. No harm in waiting for them to soften up before replacing them.

It will reduce your emissions significantly, in fact if you have a truck that won't pass emissions try the test with bio and it will probably pass. It will eliminate black smoke as well.

So at .60/gal you can reduce polution, reduce your expenses, and reduce our dependance on foreign oil. Even if you think global warming is a myth reducing emissions isn't a bad thing. :)

Other possitives of bio are that it is non toxic (less than table salt), biodegradable, it has a higher flash point then actual
diesel so its less likely to catch fire.

OK OK I could go on and on, but you get the idea. The biggest down side that I see is that homebrew is a trade of time for money. Time spent making it instead of money spent at the pump. I put 10 hours a week into it, and that is now that I have everything set up. The value of that trade is debatable. Sometimes I regret the decision, but I have to say when diesel
was $4.50/ gal I was still driving my F350 as much as I wanted. :driver:
 

orren

Member
218
0
16
WVO for fuel

I use waste vegatable oil mixed with 10% diesel.

First, I run the raw oil through 5 micron bag filters after straining
out the coarse stuff. Then I run it through a centrifuge that brings it
down to less than 1 micron.

This runs great in my 2500 RAM but I'm in North Florida so cold isn't
a big problem. When it gets a little chilly I mix in maybe up to 40%
#2 diesel fuel to the mixture.

I have trouble starting the M36A2 with the WVO. It seems the flame
thrower preheater doesn't like it. If I was using the truck alot I would
put in a small tank for pure diesel to be used for starting and shut
down.

Good luck all.
 

stampy

New member
1,321
20
0
Hi all I figured I would chime in on this thread as I have been running WVO for over 4 years with no engine problems in my daily driver, a 300sd Mercedes and more recently in the Deuce and m1009. All tolerate WVO that has been heated with water removed and centrifuged very well. When you switch over you will end up changing filters very soon after as the WVO or Bio cleans your entire fuel system. I have made Biodiesel and it is great(like rocket fuel for the Benz) but it is a lot of work and the chemicals Methanol and Lye are expensive and dangerous. I found it was better to blend 80/20 WVO/Diesel and 50/50 in the winter so I wouldn't have the expense or have to deal with chemicals. The centrifuge is KEY to this process as it filters out almost all the crap if you run it slow enough. Mind you I am talking about INDIRECT INJECTION DIESELS not DIRECT INJECTION which have more issues with injector coking. I change my filters yearly and drive!. Most of the issues I had were in the beginning, and involved not understanding how to filter well enough...all of that went away with the centrifuge. My process is: get oil, strain large particles with pump strainer while filling heating barrel, heat 120-140deg, drain water and heavies off bottom of heat barrel (exceedingly important) (all of these steps must be taken in making Biodiesel also!) run through centrifuge at 10-15 gl/hr blend in ratio with diesel, and pump into holding tank or vehicle. NOW....AS I am not selling anything...THIS IS ONLY MY OPINION...It has worked for me with 0 engine problems at all in 4+ years and over a year in the 1009. Your experience may be different, and I am sure someone has a better/ faster/ cheaper/ sexier way of doing this...This is my way and it works for me so take it or leave it your choice. In my equation you spend less in the long run and have more up front costs (ie the centrifuge, and the heater...I use a real barrel heater) after that it depends on your skill level. I made my own 55gal heated barrel setup that gravity feeds through the centrifuge to the 55gal recovery barrel so I can leave it to run. If you have any more questions just ask. Many have said you will get lower ful economy and they are right, I figure I lose about 20% fuel economy. Real B100(biodiesel) is supposed to be 90% of diesel. If you are interested read from the fryer to the fuel tank. Oh and with summer comming don't forget the biocide in your tank to kill any algae, even though if you have no water algae won't grow.
 
16,875
379
36
Stampy:
Could you please provide additional info on your centrifuge? Purchased or innovated?
I have identified a reliable and securable source of WVO. I could potentially have multiple drums of WVO per week, but will only be processing and consuming for "home use" - not selling or trading in bio-fuel.
Thanks,
John
 

stampy

New member
1,321
20
0
Yes I use a brand name simple centrifuge but Avengeusa started making them here and I believ his are of the same quality just less expensive. If I was ever to buy another it would be from him. Also a point of order here...It is illegal to sell WVOas fuel unless you go through a lot of BS and pay all the taxes. It is still a grey area whether it is legal for you to use and I also do not know the laws in your state...so do this at your own risk. My thoughts behind it is I am using less foreign made product and more USA grown fuel, I am not polluting, carbon neutral...(if you believe all that crap), and am converting waste into a useful product and lets face it saving me money...Good for me and the good ole USA!!!
 
Top