Electrolysis with pictures.

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Al Harvey

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Dover, TN
I've searched the site and have seen a few post with different members talking about electrolysis and with links to other sites. Well I've decided to post up my small setup with some pictures and show what it can do.

Here is the basic setup using a 5 gallon bucket and rebar for the electrodes. I welded them together to make a good fit in the bucket and allow for room for the part to fit down the middle.
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I use a 12volt battery with a normal battery charger hooked to the battery.
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Here is the Axle from a M151 I found that I'm gonna soak.
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Al Harvey

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Dover, TN
Added 5 gallons of water from the hose and then added 1 tablespoon of Arm & Hammer laundry soap per gallon of water. Many people will use different additives but I've found this to be the safest to the part and to your skin. Most of the other additives used are an acid to begin with and can be more aggresive towards the metal.
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After putting the part in the positive is hooked to the electrodes which in this case are the rebar. Then negative it hooked to the part to be cleaned. Just make sure the part is not touching the rebar. I use a block of wood to brace the part and reach in to feel and make sure its not touching in the water. Then hook up the batter charger and you can use 2amp or 10amp. I use 10 amp at haven't seen any problems.
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Al Harvey

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Dover, TN
I left this one in overnight about 20hours total. This is when I pulled it out today.
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After a quick rinse.
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Few seconds with a wire brush.
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Took it inside and after less then a min on the wire wheel.
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This process is good if you don't want to risk any damage to the metal. Also I'll use it on parts with a lot of rust or paint on them prior to sandblasting. It's cheap and requires no real work. Also it saves my sandblaster from getting junk in it and makes my sand last alot longer and takes no time to blast either. Here is a wheel I did in a larger tank I have. It wouldn't fit all the way so I had to do half then rotate it.

Before
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After
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kwest

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Camp Verde Arizona
Hey Gentlemen: Be careful about what you use for a bucket. Do not use anything containing stainless steel the electrolysis will create a toxic gas and a toxic solution in the water. It is standard practice to use just plain steel like a 55 gal drum or a smaller one. I have used this method befor and it works great. If you search removing rust with electricity there is a book full of advice on how to do it and different methods of getting it done. I hope this came as a precautionary note and not finding fault with what was writen earlier. Please forgive me if it sounded too condescending.
kwest
 

Al Harvey

New member
1,154
2
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Location
Dover, TN
Hey Gentlemen: Be careful about what you use for a bucket. Do not use anything containing stainless steel the electrolysis will create a toxic gas and a toxic solution in the water. It is standard practice to use just plain steel like a 55 gal drum or a smaller one. I have used this method befor and it works great. If you search removing rust with electricity there is a book full of advice on how to do it and different methods of getting it done. I hope this came as a precautionary note and not finding fault with what was writen earlier. Please forgive me if it sounded too condescending.
kwest
I've avoided the stainless steel because of that risk. I was reading in a couple different places (from people smarter on metals then me) that if you only use 12V it won't release the toxins because stainless steel requires much higher heat to release them. Not sure on that so I avoid it rather then being sorry. Another note (if I remember correctly) is lye also can put off toxic or flammable gasses if used in the water.
 

ducer

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Ober, indiana
One of the by products of doing this process is hydrogen gas. Remember the Hindenberg and what happened there? Hydrogen gas! :doh: Do it in a well ventalated space or outside only. The problem with using stainless steel is the release of the chromium from the stainless steel. Very toxic stuff as in heavy metal poisioning.

Stay safe,
Denny
 
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