Engine swap??

14ghz

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The truck I had posted about previously thinking it has a bent flex plate or something else like that, has a seized motor. Not sure why, but it won't turn at all, even with a big pry bar on the flex plate teeth and glow plugs removed.

I found a running CUCV motor for $900, my question is how much of a process is it to do a motor swap? I have never attempted anything like this before, so I'm not sure what I might be getting into. I'm guessing the entire motor/transmission will have to come out, since I can't rotate it to separate it from the torque converter.
 

cucvrus

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Bring it to 523 Jonestown Road. I have a complete 1 man staff that can swap that engine if you drop it off and you can pick it up in 2 weeks. I also have a low mileage 6.2 engine removed from a HMMWV. I would need to see the vehicle to quote a price. Also is the injection pump good on the current engine. The HMMWV engine has no useable injection pump. 717 673-5395. Jonestown PA. About 3 miles from Fort Indiantown Gap.
 

2deuce

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You will need to remove the transmission 1st. It isn't that hard. Putting it back in is a pain sometimes. Take off the hood, unbolt the motor mounts. The hard part is lifting the motor, It is heavy and if you can't lift it over the radiator, There is quite a lot to remove to pull it out the front and you will probably run into a lot of rusty bolts. If you want the experience, go for it, just remember the weight and put safety 1st. Everything is straight forward. I have pulled one out the front before, but the next time I'm going to see if I can lift it straight out, but I hope I don't have a next time. Good luck.
 

Sharecropper

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If you haven’t done this sort of thing before, I recommend taking Rick’s advice and take the vehicle over to him. In my opinion it will be the best money you will ever spend on the truck.
Just my 2 cents.
 

cucvrus

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I think I can handle this job with a broken arm. If I had a broken arm. But if transport is an issue. I have 2 CUCV tow bars that will do the hauling for $150. you pick it up when it is complete and drive it home. The batteries and injection pump are my issues and concerns. The new engine will run like a POS with a bad injection pump and I would like to have you happy in the end. Locked up engines don't scare me. I do need the truck to be complete when I start on it. Let me know. 717 673-5395. ZIP 17038. Where are you located in Maryland? Busy week with a lot going on but still have time. Take Care.
 

cucvrus

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I will NOT remove the transmission. I promise you. I will disassemble the bottom end or front of the engine to find the locked up part. That will be easy and eventful. Most work will be done outside in the sunlight and I have a winch from a barn beam and a cherry picker to pull the engine. And yes the radiator will NOT be in the truck during removal and installation. Pending condition of radiator. You just let me know. Do or do not. There is no try.
 

2deuce

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One thing I forgot to inquire about was how much you know about the history of your truck. Because while it's apart to that extent, it would be a good time to make sure the transmission doesn't need a rebuild, your radiator doesn't show any signs of a leak and the $900 engine is one you have confidence in. Don't take someones word off craigslist on how great it runs. If you need this work done right away, have it done for you. The 1st time you do this job plan on it taking a lot longer than you think. When you have the engine out you probably will want to clean and paint the engine compartment, it is the perfect time for that. Good luck! and take lots of pictures so you remember what goes where.
 

dependable

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If you want the learning experience, swapping motors is not too hard, if you are mechanically inclined and have decent tools. First time just go slow, and it will take you a lot longer than if experienced. If not into learning aspect, and you don't have a lot of time, getting someone to do it not a bad choice. CUCVRUS would also know what other things should be fixed and checked, no doubt.

I usually don't drop the transmission if I am going to use the same one, just support it and unbolt from engine, have something ready to catch fluid coming out of torque converter. At minimum, remove hood, radiator, fan.

If you have some help or means to lift, the whole front clip comes off these pretty easily. Unbolt the back of front fenders from cab, radiator mount from frame, undo harnesses, remove batteries, some hood bolts, etc, and lift the whole front sheet metal off intact w radiator assy, grill, filler panel, ect. If truck is kind of rusty, w rusted body bolts, it is a toss up as to whether removing front is easier than just hood & radiator, but it sure makes for easy access and lower lifting requirement. It is especially helpful if you plan to do other improvements and repairs.

In the old days, before I owned machinery, I swapped many engines with a tripod made from 12 ft 4x4s for legs, a foundation anchor bolt, some chain and a come a long. You can roll truck out from under, or walk tri pod out one leg at a time. On second thought, just rent an engine hoist, LOL, lots easier and safer.
 

cucvrus

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WOW. Remove the front end to remove an engine. That's a lot of work and sheet metal alignment. I never done that on any car or truck. Unless it had a flipper fiberglass hood like a HMMWV. But the CUCV is just like any other rear wheel drive vehicle. My Son's CUCV truck had a massive lift and I just took the tires off the front and lifted the motor out. I put the motor back in with the tire removed. I left him do the R & R of the big ugly wheels and tires. And I would plan on removing the engine only on this truck without any disruption or removal of the torque converter. That just opens me up to more issues not related to engine swapping. I would have the transmission rebuilt if questionable but I am not going to remove the converter. I try and avoid making more work and liability on my part. The transmission is already leaking I am sure of that. But you must draw the line somewhere. I know how it is to go overboard and get sunk in vehicles that belong to customers. It never ends well. Take Care and Be Safe.
 

dependable

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Removing front clip is not that much work once you have done it, and does not require much realignment. I was kind of a junk yarder in my early days, swapped a lot of chevy car and truck parts around, put together good trucks out of two or three junkers, parted out trucks heading to chusher, etc. Procedure to remove more or less the same from '60s through '80s, fewer fasteners to remove than one would think, as this is the way they were assembled in factory. Two strong (or one clever) people can then get it safely on the ground & out of the way.

As to torque converter, these days I'd leave on tranny, as I have a lift, but if working out in a dirt lot like I used to have to, one tries to spend as little time wrenching under truck as possible. I understand your hesitation to get into customer's trucks more than needed, but I was always working on own projects.
 

Sharecropper

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Removing front clip is not that much work once you have done it, and does not require much realignment. I was kind of a junk yarder in my early days, swapped a lot of chevy car and truck parts around, put together good trucks out of two or three junkers, parted out trucks heading to chusher, etc. Procedure to remove more or less the same from '60s through '80s, fewer fasteners to remove than one would think, as this is the way they were assembled in factory. Two strong (or one clever) people can then get it safely on the ground & out of the way.
I will jump in here for a bite.

I joined Steel Soldiers many years ago to learn from the more experienced members, and to share my experiences after I learned from them. I am still learning and sharing as this is being written. That is the beauty of this forum, as most anything can be explained if only the requester is humble enough to ask for help, and the person giving the help fully explains the processes and reasons for the process.

Having said that, you seem to know a process of removing the front clip which is not explained in the TM's. I would, therefore, like to ask you to fully explain your process in detail, not only for my benefit, but also for others who may need to swap engines. A Word document with a numbered instruction list would be outstanding.

If you are going to propose a process which is outside of the parameters of the TM's, then you should publish the details for everyone to have.

Just my 2 cents.
 

2deuce

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I didn't consult a TM when I took off the front. It was quite awhile ago, and I don't remember alignment problems unless I was into fenders and doors. I just didn't have the means to lift anything very high. If you work on these trucks a lot you are going to have that ability, but if you are doing this for the 1st time you likely will be making due with what you have and it will be a lot more work.

I have a christmas tree u-cut. Hand saws only(insurance reasons), but I will cut it off free with a chainsaw. Many buyers want to cut their own tree, for the experience and have the whole family take part. If the original poster wants to gain the experience, I say go for it. Anyone can do it.

My son, quit his job to build his own house, and do as much of the work as he could himself to save money and gain the experience. He's a perfectionist and wanted it built right. It's about 6000sq' custom design. He plans on moving in at the end of August. He says he can build me one and it will be built right without shortcuts and not just to pass inspection. He has the experience! I would not discourage someone from doing something they are interested in, but I would encourage them to be safe, not rush, and plan how you will do it before you start.
 

Sharecropper

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I didn't consult a TM when I took off the front. It was quite awhile ago, and I don't remember alignment problems unless I was into fenders and doors. I just didn't have the means to lift anything very high. If you work on these trucks a lot you are going to have that ability, but if you are doing this for the 1st time you likely will be making due with what you have and it will be a lot more work.

I have a christmas tree u-cut. Hand saws only(insurance reasons), but I will cut it off free with a chainsaw. Many buyers want to cut their own tree, for the experience and have the whole family take part. If the original poster wants to gain the experience, I say go for it. Anyone can do it.

My son, quit his job to build his own house, and do as much of the work as he could himself to save money and gain the experience. He's a perfectionist and wanted it built right. It's about 6000sq' custom design. He plans on moving in at the end of August. He says he can build me one and it will be built right without shortcuts and not just to pass inspection. He has the experience! I would not discourage someone from doing something they are interested in, but I would encourage them to be safe, not rush, and plan how you will do it before you start.

I give up.
 

dependable

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I'll give it a try, it has been a few years:

Drain radiator, disconnect hoses. Disconnect oil and transmission cooler lines from radiator and tape off to keep dirt out, same as you would for regular radiator removal.

Unbolt two front body to frame bolts under radiator support. These are just above the front of leaf spring mounts. I'd recommend some penetrating oil the night before. Might want to do this step first actually, since if you break the bolt, you will have to refasten somehow, and it might be time to reconsider if you want clip off if just changing motor. (of course dive right in if you are disassembling for rust remediation anyway)

Unbolt three bolts holding each front fender to cab. One is visible when you open door, one is under hood and one is underneath, facing in, around 10 inches in front of front cab support. You will have to remove plastic mud guard to get at that one. Make note of position of any body spacers that are present. There are also two bolts on each inner fender attaching back of inner fender to cab. These are all 9/16 head, 3/8in body bolts in this step.

Unbolt hood straps that pivot out of body. Remove entire hood if you want at this point, but necessarily not needed.

Disconnect hood latch and feed cable though hole in radiator support and tie or tuck out of way. Cut any cable ties you have to.

Disconnect front lighting harness from firewall. Remove batteries, to save on weight anyway. Disconnect windshield washer hose. Disconnect any ground straps that go to frame. On a CUCV you will also need to disconnect the battery and slave jump wires from firewall terminal block, and make sure cable to starter is freed up and not attached to inner fender any more.

You may also have to disconnect heater hose to engine if routed under the battery tray.

I think that is it, just don't lift front off with a tractor or something until you have checked there is nothing attached.

Good time to apply rust inhibitor to newly exposed surfaces when off, especially to bottom of radiator support panel. Reassemble is reverse process, with a good dab of copper anti seize recommended for each bolt.
 

Sharecropper

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I'll give it a try, it has been a few years:

Drain radiator, disconnect hoses. Disconnect oil and transmission cooler lines from radiator and tape off to keep dirt out, same as you would for regular radiator removal.

Unbolt two front body to frame bolts under radiator support. These are just above the front of leaf spring mounts. I'd recommend some penetrating oil the night before. Might want to do this step first actually, since if you break the bolt, you will have to refasten somehow, and it might be time to reconsider if you want clip off if just changing motor. (of course dive right in if you are disassembling for rust remediation anyway)

Unbolt three bolts holding each front fender to cab. One is visible when you open door, one is under hood and one is underneath, facing in, around 10 inches in front of front cab support. You will have to remove plastic mud guard to get at that one. Make note of position of any body spacers that are present. There are also two bolts on each inner fender attaching back of inner fender to cab. These are all 9/16 head, 3/8in body bolts in this step.

Unbolt hood straps that pivot out of body. Remove entire hood if you want at this point, but necessarily not needed.

Disconnect hood latch and feed cable though hole in radiator support and tie or tuck out of way. Cut any cable ties you have to.

Disconnect front lighting harness from firewall. Remove batteries, to save on weight anyway. Disconnect windshield washer hose. Disconnect any ground straps that go to frame. On a CUCV you will also need to disconnect the battery and slave jump wires from firewall terminal block, and make sure cable to starter is freed up and not attached to inner fender any more.

You may also have to disconnect heater hose to engine if routed under the battery tray.

I think that is it, just don't lift front off with a tractor or something until you have checked there is nothing attached.

Good time to apply rust inhibitor to newly exposed surfaces when off, especially to bottom of radiator support panel. Reassemble is reverse process, with a good dab of copper anti seize recommended for each bolt.

Outstanding. Thanks.
 

2deuce

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Thanks from me also. Almost makes me want to take one out! That one fender bolt underneath typically gets rusted in badly. It has a captured nut that will break loose if forced. You don't want that, use plenty of penetrating oil.
 

cucvrus

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I got this job. I will be towing the truck back to my compound over the weekend. There will be no front end removal. About the only thing I want to remove body wise is the hood. If I garage bay was higher I could leave that in place also and just open it straight up. But in the interest of safety and avoiding the guillotine effect of it slamming shut I will remove it. I seen the truck it is basically a stock vehicle under the hood. If anyone is interested I will document and post pictures of the process and engine change. I am happy to sell the 6.2 engine I have stored in my garage. I have coddled it long enough and want it to be put to use. I look forward to this job between the other jobs I have going at the moment and think it will be a challenge to complete and remain on task. I like the challenge and adventure. Take Care all and I will keep you posted. I plan on using my Tow bar and my Trail Boss to tow the CUCV back to my compound. Could you imagine any other way?2019 Silverado Custom Trail Boss.jpg
 

dependable

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Good luck & take 'er easy on the tow. I never liked flat towing much, especially when towed vehicle is heavier, but no doubt you know what you are doing.

I'd use my equipment trailer w electric brakes, but admit to being old & cautious.
 

shotty

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Can the NP208 handle being flat towed in neutral? The oil pump is on the output shaft so I would think it's possible. I know the TM gives guidance for flat towing but with proper lubrication it should be possible to tow at highway speeds as long as you want without issue...
 

cucvrus

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Not my first day on the job. The rear drive shaft will be removed at the Axle u Joint and secured to the frame. Secured not removed. Front hubs in free position, Steering column unlocked and away we go. I tow barred hundreds of CUCV's thousands of miles. With the military tow bar I never had any issues. I just use magnetic towing lights secured to the back bumper.
 
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