FLU419 SEE HMMH HME Owners group

The FLU farm

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I don't know if the 911 is bad for the injectors, but it's not something you should use unless the system is already gelled up and you need to get going NOW.

Regular anti gel can be used all the time without hurting anything. It's usually mostly a lubricity additive that also has anti gel properties. Shouldn't make anything smoke, though.
 

Speedwoble

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My Dodge RAM 3500 is a 2005 with a 6 speed manual transmission. I intentionally looked for one that was pre Obama era regulations.
“In December 2000, the EPA signed emission standards for model year 2007 and later heavy-duty highway engines, with a phase-in schedule over 2007-2010 [1044]. In addition to emission standards, the rule included ultra-low sulfur (15 ppm) diesel fuel regulations.”
You mean Clinton era regulations. There is a long time between regulations being made and them being enacted. This gives time to manufacturers to make changes.
Back on the topic of FLU’s. I don’t have any problems starting down to 20F with neither ether nor gas in the mix. My area of PA doesn’t get very cold. I would probably hesitate to put gasoline in the mix as it is lower energy per gallon and modern fuels already have less lubricity. It is a reminder that I should go get some winter mix in the tank.
 

eisenhart

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Hi!! I've been lurking on this war digger forum for a few months.... I recently acquired a SEE! I'm a huge Gwagen enthusiast as well, so that explains why I'm completely in love with Unimogs as well.
We recently got nearly 10" of snow in Asheville, which is a lot for us. I used my SEE to plow some snow and clear our private road. The 4x4 wouldn’t stay engaged so I wedged a piece of wood to keep the lever engaged. It worked great!
This SEE needs some TLC for sure, as it’s been sitting for a few years at a property in South Carolina. I haven’t started troubleshooting any of the electrical issues which are causing the dash instruments to not work. I believe the only thing working is the charging light and ammeter 0_o
Cheers!
9A921B45-A38E-4881-8AAD-B37E1390BCFD.jpeg
 

Mullaney

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Hi!! I've been lurking on this war digger forum for a few months.... I recently acquired a SEE! I'm a huge Gwagen enthusiast as well, so that explains why I'm completely in love with Unimogs as well.
We recently got nearly 10" of snow in Asheville, which is a lot for us. I used my SEE to plow some snow and clear our private road. The 4x4 wouldn’t stay engaged so I wedged a piece of wood to keep the lever engaged. It worked great!
This SEE needs some TLC for sure, as it’s been sitting for a few years at a property in South Carolina. I haven’t started troubleshooting any of the electrical issues which are causing the dash instruments to not work. I believe the only thing working is the charging light and ammeter 0_o
Cheers!
View attachment 856688
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Welcome to the Outfit!

Glad to hear that you have your very own piece of green goodness - and that you got a little snow to keep it gainfully employed! :)

Don't forget that you can hunt down the schematics here and some of the TM's as well. Nice looking truck too!
 

The FLU farm

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I routinely put Optilube XPD in the tanks of all of my diesels. Optilube XPD came out number one in lubricity tests.
Optilube is what I use in the 3500 in the summer.

Depending on when I get fuel delivered for things that stay on the property, like the FLUs, the supplier uses Howes if it's a fall or winter delivery.
Not wanting to mix different brands, that's what I add to the tanks and vehicles as needed, too.
 

The FLU farm

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I have never operated a backhoe before. No one could accuse me of being an efficient, I am learning as I go.
That makes two of us, rtrask.

I always figured that if I was given a backhoe to operate on perfectly flat ground, I'd have it on its side within 20 minutes.
Thankfully, that still hasn't happened, which is odd.

One thing that might help me a bit is that I run the engine at low rpms, so I can keep up.
 
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glcaines

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That makes two of us, rtrask.
I always figured that if I was given a backhoe to operate on perfectly flat ground, I'd have it on its side within 20 minutes.
Thankfully, that still hasn't happened, which is odd.
One think that might help me a bit is that I run the engine at low rpms, so I can keep up.
That makes three of us. I've been learning the hard way. Unfortunately, I don't have any flat ground. I'm in the mountains and 100% of my backhoe work with the FLU419 has been on inclines, some significant. Very scary!
 

rtrask

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That makes two of us, rtrask.

I always figured that if I was given a backhoe to operate on perfectly flat ground, I'd have it on its side within 20 minutes.
Thankfully, that still hasn't happened, which is odd.

One thing that might help me a bit is that I run the engine at low rpms, so I can keep up.
It's not exactly flat, but so far that is not an issue. Before I am done with this trench I will have to deal with terrain, and rocks. Fortunately when it gets steep it will be in the direction I am digging so I don't think it is much of a roll hazard. One advantage I have is that there are not many rocks in this first stretch and the soil is not hard to work. In a lot of ways I don't think I could ask for a better place to learn how to use the SEE.
 

MajorMogger

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Texas
The guy who owned my FLU before me took the FOPS off and lost the bolts! Anyone know the bolt/nut specs (thread pitch, thread length, diameter, thread pitch, hardness etc)?

I tried to derive this from the NSN but was unsuccessful.
 
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Mullaney

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Did a thread search but couldn't clarify - is the alcohol for the break system "Denatured alcohol" or what kind of alcohol is it?


Also, the guy who owned my FLU before me took the FOPS off and lost the bolts! Anyone know the bolt/nut specs (thread pitch, thread length, diameter, thread pitch, hardness etc)?

I tried to derive this from the NSN but was unsuccessful.
.
Alcohol - Isopropanol has less water content. Goal is to remove the water, so the higher the number the better. Highest I have found is 99%.

Worthy of Consideration: Alcohol dries out rubber. The more you use it, the more the hoses and diaphragms and rubber o-rings in the air system are exposed to the alcohol (obviously)
 

MajorMogger

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Is it even necessary in temps like 18-28? I'm not really sure at what point it would become a problem. I did do this search and found it is in fact denatured alcohol? I wonder if that is easier on the rubber?



Also for future reference it looks like I found the content %, the original was 94.9%, so I'm assuming the 95% denatured from Home Depot is very close to spec? Anyone had issues w/ denatured vs isopropyl?

See "OE 760" section near top here : https://aerospace-adhesive.com/chemicals/denatured-alcohol/page/2/
  • Composition And Percentage: 94.9 by volume alcohol
 

The FLU farm

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Is it even necessary in temps like 18-28? I'm not really sure at what point it would become a problem.
While compressed air can apparently freeze its water content at fairly high temperatures, I don't think you need to worry in Texas.

Case in point: The one thing I stole off of what was supposed to be the parts SEE (before realizing that it's a great running machine) was the alky injection container and hose.

Put those parts on the original SEE, and just capped off the hose nipple on the "parts car". That was years ago. It has seen -10 a few times, and so far no issues whatsoever.
Now, it's dry here. If it was cold and humid, that could be different story.
 

MajorMogger

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Thank you for this input. So current conditions are icy precipitation etc. I am glad to know it's not like my brakes will lock up or something when it gets below freezing.


How do y'all confirm the system is working as expected after you put alcohol in it?
 
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