FLU419 SEE HMMH HME Owners group

MSMOG

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Jackson, Mississippi
Today we are going to hopefully get to a point where we can comfortably and safely drive one of the 3 SEE trucks around the neighborhood. Might even dig up the neighbors yard (they are out of town).

We did discover more damage underneath from the dreaded forks. Muffler and exhaust pipe scraped and slightly dented, but I think they are ok. There area couple of bent bars. I'm assuming these are the track bars or stabilizer bars. The air tanks also got smacked, and I've disconnected an annoying buzzer in the cab... I'm guessing this is the air pressure alarm.

I'm considering pulling the front end loader off before we go cruising. I found a Reese 54" tractor jack for $70 at a Tractor Supply. I think it's going to work. Looks a little dangerous. I'm definitely going to put a block and a rubber pad underneath the leg. Might need to fab something so I can actually pin it to the loader, as it's designed. Sure do wish someone would start fabbing some jacks like they did those tilt brackets...

http://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/reese-towpower-farm-jack-54-in

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FOD

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Has anyone ever had a problem with their fuel system not supplying adequate fuel flow when under load? I pulled out the backhoe to do some range maintenance today and after a few minutes of high RPMs the motor started to sputter like it was not getting enough fuel. Eventually it stalled out, and upon restart would only wind up to about 1600 RPM at full throttle. I pulled the sediment strainer which looks fine and then checked the fuel filter housings, they were bone dry. I'm wondering if it's the fuel primer pump. Thoughts? I also noticed a similar issue when I was messing around driving up and down some pretty steep hills prior to getting out the backhoe.
 

Bikers33

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British Columbia
Has anyone ever had a problem with their fuel system not supplying adequate fuel flow when under load? I pulled out the backhoe to do some range maintenance today and after a few minutes of high RPMs the motor started to sputter like it was not getting enough fuel. Eventually it stalled out, and upon restart would only wind up to about 1600 RPM at full throttle. I pulled the sediment strainer which looks fine and then checked the fuel filter housings, they were bone dry. I'm wondering if it's the fuel primer pump. Thoughts? I also noticed a similar issue when I was messing around driving up and down some pretty steep hills prior to getting out the backhoe.
Make sure the fuel shutoff valve is fully open
 

The FLU farm

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There area couple of bent bars. I'm assuming these are the track bars or stabilizer bars....and I've disconnected an annoying buzzer in the cab... I'm guessing this is the air pressure alarm.

I'm considering pulling the front end loader off before we go cruising. I found a Reese 54" tractor jack for $70 at a Tractor Supply. I think it's going to work. Looks a little dangerous.
I didn't dare drive mine with those bars still bent. Something (like the torque tube) must end up under lots of stress when those bars are effectively shortened. Look a back a few pages and you'll see how they can be straightened, the easy way.

Yes, that miserable buzzer is for the air alarm. For those who fail to notice the gauge and/or warning light.

Why don't you get a cheap trailer jack and weld it to some material that fits in the jack "reciever"? That way the loader is somewhat stabilized in that end side to side.
 

The FLU farm

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Has anyone ever had a problem with their fuel system not supplying adequate fuel flow when under load? I pulled out the backhoe to do some range maintenance today and after a few minutes of high RPMs the motor started to sputter like it was not getting enough fuel. Eventually it stalled out, and upon restart would only wind up to about 1600 RPM at full throttle. I pulled the sediment strainer which looks fine and then checked the fuel filter housings, they were bone dry. I'm wondering if it's the fuel primer pump. Thoughts? I also noticed a similar issue when I was messing around driving up and down some pretty steep hills prior to getting out the backhoe.
Plugged fuel tank vent? If so, try removing (or loosen) the cap.
 

911joeblow

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Utah
Plugged fuel tank vent? If so, try removing (or loosen) the cap.
Sounds like what mine did. I had reversed fuel lines and since the return is only half way down to the bottom of the tank, it will start to fuel starve well before the tank is empty.
 

FOD

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Sounds like what mine did. I had reversed fuel lines and since the return is only half way down to the bottom of the tank, it will start to fuel starve well before the tank is empty.
Interesting, did you reverse them accidentally or did they come that way? I'll have to check that out.

As an update I pulled the plug that sits on the filter housing and cranked the motor, only a small amount of fuel came out. I then tried the hand pump to get a feel for comparative volumes and it was a lot more flow. Leads me to believe the issue is the fuel pump either not taking a good prime due to air ingestion or something mechanically with the pump. I'm going to connect an electric fuel pump tomorrow to see if I can observe flow back at the return and verify the entire path is open. Does anyone know how the overflow that goes back to the tank from the injectors works? I want to make sure I don't pump a gallon of fuel directly into my cylinders or something stupid like that.

I also checked the vent and it seems ok.
 

The FLU farm

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Anybody else have an inaccessible (for all practical purposes) upper Zerk fitting on the bucket cylinder, appropriately called number 13 in the lube chart?
Eventually got some grease in that one, using a near perfectly sized 90-degree adapter. Obviously that particular cylinder is not entirely standard issue on these backhoes.
Three tubes of grease and nearly a half day later, all but one (number 14 on one side) of the Zerks were finally taken care of, but eight of the 36 put up quite a fight one way or another.
Good thing I got the left door realigned so it latches properly, and that the air tank drains suddenly stopped leaking. Otherwise it would've been a rather dismal day as far as progress goes.
 

MSMOG

Member
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8
Location
Jackson, Mississippi
Today was pretty busy. We relplaced the engine oil and the fuel filters on one truck. In doing so, we managed to break off the barb on the banjo fitting. I think it's a 14mm bolt. Any suggestions on the best place to pick one up? I included a picture below of a similar bolt and fitting.

We we did use the 54" Reese tractor jack to remove the front end loader, and it did the trick. Not super sturdy. One of the big washers broke in half. Thank the good Lord for air tools.

Rather than pull the dash to clean out the mouse motel (which might have been easier), we pulled the fuse panel and the air intake hoses. Note to self: before using compressed air to clean out mouse droppings and nest makings, cover the engine air intake hole when hose is removed... I think/hope most of that crap blew into the cab. Might have to find that inspection camera I bought and never used. I suppose the mice were kind, all things considered. Looks like we can repair most of the damage with liquid insulation. I may have to splice in a few wires.

We also pulled a fuel tank and are soaking it in ChemDip. Old timer said it was the S***, in so many words. Lots of rust and trash in that tank (see fingers below). It also must have been something other diesel, as I have noticed several others mention. We did have success freeing up a seized parking brake cable, but it looks like we have a bad main seal. There was zero fluid when we drained the trans. Hopefully, it's a SLOW leak. Anyone ever replaced a main seal? Wonder if I could drop it off at RRAD and fake a work order. We also got 2 bent fenders pulled off, which I will attempt to pound back into submission. And we pulled a tire which keeps leaking down. I think the problem may been rust on the inside of the rim. Has anyone ever considered putting tubes in these tires?

I included a picture of the bent bars underneath. What exactly you are they called? Stabilizer/track bars? Is that correct?

All in all, pretty productive, even if we didn't get to tear up the neighbors yard. I was going to blame thier dog.

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MSMOG

Member
84
1
8
Location
Jackson, Mississippi
Anybody else have an inaccessible (for all practical purposes) upper Zerk fitting on the bucket cylinder, appropriately called number 13 in the lube chart?
Eventually got some grease in that one, using a near perfectly sized 90-degree adapter. Obviously that particular cylinder is not entirely standard issue on these backhoes.
Three tubes of grease and nearly a half day later, all but one (number 14 on one side) of the Zerks were finally taken care of, but eight of the 36 put up quite a fight one way or another.
Good thing I got the left door realigned so it latches properly, and that the air tank drains suddenly stopped leaking. Otherwise it would've been a rather dismal day as far as progress goes.
Got a picture of the general area where that inaccessible zerk fitting is? Or a picture of the chart? I don't have one in front of me right now.
 

The FLU farm

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Today was pretty busy. We relplaced the engine oil and the fuel filters on one truck. In doing so, we managed to break off the barb on the banjo fitting. I think it's a 14mm bolt. Any suggestions on the best place to pick one up?
The quickest way (unless you have good hardware stores nearby) is to make one. Having a lathe helps, but isn't necessary.
Either way, you should measure the diameter and pitch before proceeding.
 

MSMOG

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Location
Jackson, Mississippi
The quickest way (unless you have good hardware stores nearby) is to make one. Having a lathe helps, but isn't necessary.
Either way, you should measure the diameter and pitch before proceeding.
Luckily, we didn't break the bolt. The barb broke off the spherical fitting (see pic below). I went to one specialty hardware store and 4 auto parts places today, and everyone just gave me a blank stare when I showed it to them. Of course, they always ask "what year, make, and model" so the computer can tell them what to do. I try to tell them that it's not going to be in their system...

image.jpg
 

The FLU farm

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Luckily, we didn't break the bolt. The barb broke off the spherical fitting (see pic below). I went to one specialty hardware store and 4 auto parts places today, and everyone just gave me a blank stare when I showed it to them. Of course, they always ask "what year, make, and model" so the computer can tell them what to do. I try to tell them that it's not going to be in their system...
Ah, sorry, too tired to catch that it wasn't the bolt. Can you braze it back together?
If not, some SU fuel pumps have banjo fittings of about that size. As does Holley carbs, come to think of it.
 

The FLU farm

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Got a picture of the general area where that inaccessible zerk fitting is? Or a picture of the chart? I don't have one in front of me right now.
Okay, here are photos of how it should look, and the way it does when the cylinder isn't quite correct.DSCN1385[1].jpg With the 90-degree Zerk fully visible, and accessible.DSCN1386[1].jpgAnd here's how it looks when the Zerk is at the top of the cylinder, rather than on the side facing out.
Yes, it's in there, but it was dumb luck that it could be reached with one of my 90-degree grease gun adapters. And it took a few tries before I got that one to work.
Another strong indication of that this isn't quite the correct replacement cylinder is that the Zerk in the lower (rod) end isn't inset. When curling the bucket in fully, then lowering the whole thing to the ground, guess what hits the dirt first...yes, that unprotected Zerk fitting.
The easy fix would be to weld a ring around it, but I suspect that it wouldn't last all that long. Unless working strictly in rock free dirt. Drilling and tapping a new hole in a more protected place is probably the more logical approach.
 

MSMOG

Member
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Location
Jackson, Mississippi
Okay, here are photos of how it should look, and the way it does when the cylinder isn't quite correct.View attachment 650412 With the 90-degree Zerk fully visible, and accessible.View attachment 650414And here's how it looks when the Zerk is at the top of the cylinder, rather than on the side facing out.
Yes, it's in there, but it was dumb luck that it could be reached with one of my 90-degree grease gun adapters. And it took a few tries before I got that one to work.
Another strong indication of that this isn't quite the correct replacement cylinder is that the Zerk in the lower (rod) end isn't inset. When curling the bucket in fully, then lowering the whole thing to the ground, guess what hits the dirt first...yes, that unprotected Zerk fitting.
The easy fix would be to weld a ring around it, but I suspect that it wouldn't last all that long. Unless working strictly in rock free dirt. Drilling and tapping a new hole in a more protected place is probably the more logical approach.

Forgive me if this is a stupid question, but could you rotate the cylinder 180 degrees to fix both problems?
 

The FLU farm

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Forgive me if this is a stupid question, but could you rotate the cylinder 180 degrees to fix both problems?
I wish. But the Zerk's holes would still be at the ends, not on the sides, so the only result would be that the plumbing becomes more problematic.
With any luck, this particular "problem" cylinder may be the only one like it on a SEE. If they were common, surely someone else would've noticed these issues within hours of taking possession of their "new" SEE.
In my case (no pun intended) this one has been parked since I bought it in February, with one exception for a photo op, and was intended to be a parts car. While checking/changing fluids and lubing would've normally happened very shortly after delivery, and definitely before any actual use, it didn't.
Now that it'll become the regular, working backhoe, I'm scrambling to get it fully operational before winter sets in.
If we even get any winter to speak of, since I have all but guaranteed that we won't by converting the other SEE to a snowblower. Impatiently awaiting the ordered fittings and hoses needed to finish that project.
 
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