Frequency Fluctuating on MEP802

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mavucci

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I have tried searching on here and on google. My electrician just installed a transfer switch on my home so now i am ready for a power outage with my MEP802. I have an electric oven to exercise the machine. When i hooked the machine up to my house to run everything it ran great and was able to power my whole home no sweat. I did notice that after about 10 min of running the house on generator power that the frequency meter was bouncing all over the place and was not steady at 60hz. the machine didn't sound like it was surging or bogging down and was just humming along. I did not notice any lights flicker or any issues with electronics in the house. When i noticed the frequency bouncing around I disconnected the generator from the house and let the generator run and the needle was still all over the place at times. It was getting dark to try to troubleshoot any problems. Has this happened to anyone? My next step when i have time will be to run the generator with the oven and see if i can recreate the issue of the frequency bouncing and check the lugs with a multimeter. Does anyone have any suggestions? the only thing i could find in the TM's was to make sure the connection on the back of the hz. meter which i believe is M2 gauge. and they were clean and solid.

Thanks,
Mike S.
 

m32825

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You need another data point. Plug a "Kill A Watt" meter into the convenience outlet and see what frequency it reads. That's what I use to dial mine in...
 

jamawieb

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Agree with m32825, get a kill a watt meter and plug it into an outlet in the house. It will be a problem with the gauge or transducer. The 802a has an updated transducer and I've never seen one fail, it's always the gauge. The older 002a models always had problems with the transducer.
 

Daybreak

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Howdy,

Always double check against the gauges.

The MEP-8xx gauges are ok, but also back up the information with a good multimeter to see where you stand.
 

Guyfang

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The problem is indeed, a meter or transducer. Get a good multi meter. The kill a watt meter is a good idea, but a multi meter is more handy in the sence that you can mesure many more different things. According to everyone here in the forum, the kill a watt meter is cheap, so you could just plug it in, and forget the gen set meter.

In any case, verify the hertz reading.
 

Light in the Dark

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Yup, start with a kill-a-watt (drive by any home depots in your travel? normally in stock), and long term also get a good meter. Good luck with the diagnosis.
 

Bmxenbrett

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Dont run your house on a generator you know isnt running properly! That can be really costly.

A multi meter usualy has a hz meter. When was the last time you changed the fuel filters?
 

Guyfang

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This is not an engine problem. If it was, you would hear it. Could be as simple as a broken wire, bad meter or a freq transducer. But not engine.
 

goat4hooves

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I second the advice above. The genny I bought had a faulty frequency meter. I use a digital meter to set the frequency.
 

technoid

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If one has a bad freq transducer where can you buy a replacement? My Mep803a also has a bouncing meter. But the Fluke reads fairly steady with some digital fluctuation.
 

DieselAddict

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In my opinion its best to go to a newer gauge that doesn't require the transducer. They are super cheap and plenty accurate for our needs.
 
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