Fuel additives for cold weather and/or storage

M1165A1

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I'm now operating the HMMWV in an extremely cold mountain environment (it's 12 degrees this morning and the roads are between 7,000 and 11,000 feet here) and it's also sitting for as much as a month at a time.

Wondering if anyone uses any additives to deal with these kind of factors, like cetane booster, or diesel storage additive, or Howe's, etc. So far I haven't had issues, but I want to be on top of this.
 

BKubu

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I use Power Service diesel fuel conditioner mostly, but I've also used Howes. I have had good service from them. I actually use that stuff all year around. The biggest thing I'd caution you (and everyone) about is making sure you burn through your summer blend fuel before it gets really cold. A lot of times, we as hobbyists don't drive our trucks much so fuel from the summer or spring may still be in the tank in the winter. I've had it happen before. If you get in any bad situations, you can always use Diesel 9-1-1 by Power Service. This lowers the pour point and other things.
 

Coug

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Diesel anti-gel is usually a good idea when you start getting that cold.

The main pumps you buy your fuel at, if they are in the same area, should be treating their diesel for use in that cold of weather, but adding more anti-gel won't hurt anything.

Howes, PowerService, HotShot's Secret, or Opti-Lube are all good products and sell anti-gel treatments.
 

TOBASH

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I knew a guy who used gasoline... Anyone ever done that or heard of that?
 

Coug

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Old diesel has sulfur in it for lubrication. Most of the clearances/wear surfaces were also larger, so a little gasoline in the fuel won't cause much additional wear (within reason)

Modern diesel (ULSD) has almost no sulfur, and they have to add in stuff for lubrication. Then a lot of us tend to add more stuff for even better lubrication.

Adding gasoline to ULSD, in any quantity, is a bad idea.

VW had some issues with the high pressure fuel pumps in their 5th and 6th gen TDI cars. They had a high rate of failure due to the design (compared to previous versions, the cam surfaces were a lot smaller, and the pressures they were operating at was much higher). VW was denying a lot of warranties by claiming gasoline contamination.

In our motors, a little gasoline mixed in, in small amounts, probably wouldn't be too big of a deal, provided you also added something to increase lubricity at the same time.
Too much gasoline, and you'll blow up your engine.

Much safer, and cheaper in the long run, to just purchase a quality, off the shelf additive for anti-gel, than to try mixing some cocktail that you have no idea how much damage it might do.
 

simp5782

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Just use #1 diesel before you store the truck. So if it's cold and you need it atleast it has severe cold treaded fuel already

#1 also doesn't grow crap in it if it has to sit for a bit.

I use blue products cause it goes on clearance at tractor supply for $2 to $5 a bottle often.

You can lace diesel with gas to get it moving again if it gels bad.

I had a 12v 9amp pad heater on my fuel tank and on my fuel filter. They make coolant fuel heaters you can put in line If the engine isn't the type to return alot to the tank. Even #1 with anti gel it can gel up. Anytime you drive it drain your water separator.

Always keep an extra fuel filter and bottle of 911 in the truck.
 

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royalflush55

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I knew a guy who used gasoline... Anyone ever done that or heard of that?
Truckers used to add 10% gasoline to high sulphur diesel with no problems. I would not recommend that with ULSD.
I use Power Service in my diesel year around. Use Arctic formula in the winter time. Use double rate if operating below zero to prevent gelling.
 

dhaumann69166

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I knew a guy who used gasoline... Anyone ever done that or heard of that?
When it gets below zero I do that sometimes. Just can’t be stupid with your mix. 3/4 to 1 gallon of gas per 100 gallon of diesel MAX! I usually only do that if I run out of regular treatment. Most of the time I run either Stanadyne or the white bottle 911. Never gelled up once last year in a week of -30°.
 

BKubu

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I knew a guy who used gasoline... Anyone ever done that or heard of that?
Yes. Joe Young from NJ (RIP), a long time deuce dealer, told me he used to do it back before they had winter and summer blend fuels. He was a fuel oil distributor. I don't recall if he ever told me the formula for correctly doing it, and I never thought of doing it given the winter fuels that are available and diesel fuel conditioner.
 

BKubu

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Yes. Joe Young from NJ (RIP), a long time deuce dealer, told me he used to do it back before they had winter and summer blend fuels. He was a fuel oil distributor. I don't recall if he ever told me the formula for correctly doing it, and I never thought of doing it given the winter fuels that are available and diesel fuel conditioner.
...and, no, he did not pass away from mixing gas into his diesel! :)
 

Coug

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Also to note: the quality and formula for gasoline today is pretty different than it was back 30 years ago, or even more different if you go back over 50 years ago when gasoline was leaded.

We are dealing with petroleum products that are called the same, and come from the same distillation stock, but in the end really only act similar to what they used to, but not the same.
 

diesel dave

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I have no idea why anyone,past or present would add gas to diesel. I’ve had heavy trucks for decades and never heard of this. Sounds like “an old truckers tale” like the reason truckers leave thier trucks running is “because it takes more fuel to start them than to leave them run”.Why experiment with some sort of witches brew that has the potential to damage your engine. Diesel has for decades been “cut” with kerosene in winter climates. If you want to play,use kero.Personally,if I saw that a cold spell was coming (below 0) I would use one of the fuel anti gel conditioners as an additional precaution in all my trucks. Above 0,no need.
 

royalflush55

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In southern states kerosene was not always available. Therefore truckers did add gasoline to prevent gelling when colder weather than normal showed its face.
 
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