Gasoline and WMO mix ?

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61sleepercab

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Walton, West Virginia
My 1982 VW Rabbit with mechanical injector pump manual stated that you could run up to 20% gasoline to 80% diesel mix in winter.

Modern gasoline goes bad in about 60 days, a friends dirt tract car would not even start on six month old pump gasoline. I would not try running junk yard gas in a modern fuel injected car.
A friend used to work in the local oil refinery laboratory and i asked "why does today's gas go to gum and varnish in no time?" He replied," older gas was run once through the distillation column and you pulled off what gasoline you got, now heavy compounds are treated and cracked into lighter compounds, AND WHAT IS CRACKED DOES NOT ALWAYS STAY CRACKED!"

Anybody pulled apart a carburetor run on unleaded gas lately? See any green looking stuff in the castings, bowls ?? It is ALGAE growing in the alcohol water mix in the gas. Carb cleaner will not touch it....... Use Dawn dish detergent. Isnt saving the planet with these new fuels fun? Mark
 
357
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Location
Prescott, AZ
I hate to bring an old thread back to life, but I am wanting to make sure I'm clear on some things.
First off, if I'm reading correctly, I can change my oil on the deuce, filter it, and then dump it into the fuel tank?
Second, what size exactly is the fuel tank on the M35a2?
So from what I'm understanding, with a half tank of diesel, I can simply change the oil in the deuce, filter it, and just dump it right in!? That's what, 22 quarts of used oil?
silverstate55 is right 30% is max on the gasoline, because, as 61sleepercab, pointed out, there is now alcohol in our gasoline. alcohol in our gasoline ruins the seals in old engines, like the multifuel.

Yes, you can burn waste motor oil in almost any turbo-equiped diesel engine. The trick in converting waste oils into diesel fuel, is blend it with gasoline at 20%. Leave it undisturbed for at least a week, and better a month, then carefully separate the good fuel that floats to the top (top 90%), from the sediments at the bottom, then filter to 1-micron, and/or centrifuge it.
 

steelypip

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Charlottesville, VA
silverstate55 is right 30% is max on the gasoline, because, as 61sleepercab, pointed out, there is now alcohol in our gasoline. alcohol in our gasoline ruins the seals in old engines, like the multifuel.
Luckily, there's rising awareness that a) ethanol in gasoline is nothing but a sop to corn farmers, and b) that it's bad for anything that isn't fuel injected. Depending on your local environmental regulations, you may be able to fill up with no-ethanol mogas at the pump. It's gotten steadily more available around here as the years have passed. I always fill up my small engine tote can with the stuff because it keeps so much better.

I also fill up my older gasser cars with the stuff, because their fuel systems are calibrated for no ethanol. They do adapt, but they run better when they don't have to. There is a difference in cost at the pump, but it is pretty much a wash when you figure in the 5-7% fuel energy/gallon reduction caused by adding ethanol.

I would go wherever I had to for no-ethanol fuel for blending into a diesel mix. It's just going to be so much more shelf stable and predictable.
 
357
1
18
Location
Prescott, AZ
While, for a diesel engine, I would prefer alcohol-free gasoline in my blend; for a gasoline engine I am happy that alcohol is in it. Yes, alcohol in gasoline is a way for presidents to buy off the corn belt vote; however, so far it is the best octane enhancer that has been used. Previous octane enhancers, such as: lead bromide and MTBF, caused serious health and environmental issues; whereas alcohol just causes problems for hoses and seals on old engines.
 

frank8003

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Ethanol eats rubber and does it not have an affinity for water? I don't know about Viton seals but have not developed any leaks. I don't put pump gas in the Deuce tank. I had success using 10% of today's new type crap diesel and 90% new motor oil or many different concoctions of used motor oil from cars.
I refused to use the drain lube oil from any diesel as can not get the soot out which wipes the HH.
I set it up that all fuel went thru a 6 micron filter and being constantly recirculated back to the tank.
All that was recirculated of that not being used by the engine. With engine off it would filter once thru all the fuel in about 90 minutes, but had to keep the little charger on the batteries in case I forgot the in-tank pump was running.
Runs good, very little smoke. Multifuel with turbo.
 

steelypip

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Charlottesville, VA
Ethanol eats rubber and does it not have an affinity for water?
Yes, Ethanol is hygroscopic. It's why the azeotrope is only about 98% pure. If you pour a pint of Everclear into a beaker during the Southern US summer, it will change from 190 proof (95%) to some lower value over the next couple of hours as it sucks water right out of the air. It'll also stink up the lab something fierce (I used it in a water content measurement apparatus).

This is, incidentally, how fuel dryer compounds "DryGas" work. You pour some alcohol in the fuel tank, it goes into a miscible water/alcohol solution so the fuel pump can pick it up, is (somewhat) soluble in the fuel, and no longer freezes at 32F.

The big problem with ethanol as a fuel additive is that water plus alcohol plus hydrocabons equals dinner for bacteria. You end up with gunge in carburetors and plugged up fuel passages. I've had ethanol gas keep for years in a sealed oil bottle (make small batches of two stroke premix for string trimmers and chain saws), but if atmospheric moisture can get to it, it'll saturate the ethanol. Then the rusting and goo formation starts.
 
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357
1
18
Location
Prescott, AZ
Good points; however, when anhydrous alcohol (either ethyl or methyl) is used in fuel, it is combined with a co-solvent, which is in most cases a polar solvent, such as MEK. When this solution is made the alcohol tends to reject water in favor of petroleum distillates.

However, back to the issue of alcohol and elastomers; alcohol is hard on Bunna-N and silicon seals, but does not seem to effect flourocarbon seals such as teflon and viton seals. More interesting though is as long as the alcohol content of your fuel blend is <= 3% alcohol, then your seals are safe.

A few months ago I experimented with alcohol-free gasoline. Here I discovered that the petroleum industry must be using xylol (xylene) in place of either ethyl or methyl alcohols. And, the xylene component is at about 10%, which is too high for silicon seals. This is also true of ULSD (Ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel). Which, by the way, means if you are running an old 6.2L or 6.5L diesel engine, then you will have to dilute ULSD by 50% to avoid ruining the silicon seals inside of Stanadyne injector pumps.

Biodiesel is neutral, so are: WVO, WMO, hydraulic oil and ATF, so you could dilute your ULSD fuel with one or more of those oils to prevent premature failure of your Stanadyne injector pump.
 
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