Handling heavy tires

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HDN

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Finger Lakes, NY
This winter I was hoping to pull the wheels off my M35A3 to do the rim seals. Of course I forgot that they weigh nearly 400 lbs each and I sold my tractor to buy the truck (I wasn't using my tractor at all!).

So how can I safely handle these wheels on my own? Would a simple hydraulic engine crane cut it with removal aid? Or should I just take the truck to a shop and have someone else deal with it?
 

Ajax MD

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Mayo, MD
Somewhere in this video archive, Wes demonstrates how he man-handles 400lb. tires without really much equipment.
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTdrvQqNVD4dOJidPFnmYGA/videos

I went back and forth about whether I wanted to single up my truck or not and decided against it for just this reason. I can easily handle a 210 lb. wheel asssembly. I do not want to hassle with over 400lbs. and a grove crane if I have a flat tire, no matter how cool it looks.
 

cattlerepairman

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Look, it depends where you are at in your life. Here is another video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tgX1xYNfZL0

You "can" take the outer half off with the rim mounted to the truck, replace the O-ring, replace the outer half and reseat the bead. Imagine the wheel in the video remaining bolted to the hub. It would work the exact same way.

Or, you can go to a tire shop and have them do it. And have them do it over when one O-ring ends up leaking. Much more fun that way than leaning over the handle of your sledge after you are finally all done, with your lower back hurting, for a moment of pain relief, and THEN realizing that you get to do a tire over again.

But, your mileage may vary and I wish you success and air tight rims!


P.S. I will get to do my Canadian combat rims next spring. Off the truck and with 11.00R20 mounted, so a bit less weight. I'll do a couple and then re-assess!
 
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davidb56

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Bonners Ferry Idaho
A shop engine hoist would help if you have a concrete slab, which I dont. A low profile floor jack would help if you jack the truck up 6 inches of clearance and roll the tire up onto it. they also sell a "wheel Caddy" that does it too, but is pricey. I have them on the front of my truck (14.5x20 XL) and just use my Lug wrench cheater bar while having the clearance at about 1-2 inches high. It really is easier than farting around with equipment for me. Also if you dont have a slab of cement to work on, buy a 1 inch sheet of plywood and "treat" it with used M35a2 motor oil, especially on the edges. It won't rot or delaminate.
 

NY Tom

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Pallet Jack is great I resisted getting one for a long time. Reasonable price available at Harbor Frt. if you have a coupon. Otherwise try to find a decent used one.

Used it to take out and rebuild my entire front axle with the springs on it. Have to take off the drums and brake plate on one side. Wheeled the thing in and out of my garage and all over the driveway for 6 months. Sinks into blacktop on a hot day so roll onto plywood. Lifted it right up under the truck for one man install.

Now I have it to take out the dual rear wheels which should be easy. Probably work for single front tires as well maybe with a strap. Should be fine for bigger tires too.
 

exhogflyer

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Albany NY
Let's look at this realistically and honestly.........in my younger days I would have thought nothing of humping 400 lb wheel/tire assemblies on and off. Now in my 60's it's sure as heck NOT
worth getting hurt over or being in pain for 3 weeks. Could I still do it? Yes...….. would I? NO **** WAY. Pay a shop or get help AND some equipment. 400 lbs of rubber and steel getting loose and flopping on you
will be very exciting.
NOT!
 

davidb56

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Bonners Ferry Idaho
There are no nearby shops around my area. Often a person has to plan for "un planned events" that require doing it themselves, or get to a phone reception area and call a mobile truck tire shop to replace it for them. Calling and paying for services is a plan too.
 

Finallygotone

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South Louisiana
gosh still have my tractor with homemade from attachment, drop one of them sure going to need help, that last front axel bearing and seal change out was enough just lifting the brake drum twice, do have me a Clark 500 fork lift now, just in time, to break the beads I got a slide bead breaker from Northern Tool years ago they are pricey now notice that they have them on Amazon half the price, fellow, I use it on lawnmower tires, tractors, just finished seven of them on a Model AA for with the split rims, that was a job.
http://AME 71500 'Big Buddy' Tire Bead Breaker Slide Hammer
 

simp5782

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Memphis, TN
Tire just rests on it and it rolls around. To install on the truck it uses the leverage of the ground on the handle to raise it and put it on the hub. Simple as that
 

rustystud

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Woodinville, Washington
I'm not familiar with tire installation dollies. Is there a good place I can look to see how they're used?
The problem with them is they cannot handle that much weight. They are usually only rated to 200Ibs. WE used them a lot at the transit department. They would usually only last a couple of months before breaking. You could build your own out of heavy tube that would handle the weight, but then your wrestling the dolly and the tire assembly too. A tire jack is the best way to handle this situation but you will need a flat concrete surface to work on. Plus they sell for $500.00 to $1500.00 on average.
 
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montaillou

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W.WA
If you have a good concrete surface you can get one of these wheel dollies, they're rated usually over 1k lbs:

1501-1.jpg
Used expect to pay ~$250+

I have one, but a friend showed me a trick using a pneumatic jack and I don't use mine. Line the wheel with the hub and raise it until the wheel just rests on the lip, raise it a little more to get it off the ground and push it on.
 

Ajax MD

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Mayo, MD
If you have a good concrete surface you can get one of these wheel dollies, they're rated usually over 1k lbs:

View attachment 783835
Used expect to pay ~$250+

I have one, but a friend showed me a trick using a pneumatic jack and I don't use mine. Line the wheel with the hub and raise it until the wheel just rests on the lip, raise it a little more to get it off the ground and push it on.
That jack can also handle dually's without splitting them up. Very handy.
 

Oerthedge21

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Location
Northford CT
You can do it with your bare hands with a longish crowbar or an actual tire bar if you have one. That's how I do the xzl+ on my truck, and I've taken them off several times now. Much easier to put on than to take off but still very doable if you've ever changed a truck tire
 
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