JEEP REUNION at THE REUNION

Madmedic

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As discussed in a previous thread, I restored a friends M151. While doing the restoration I found unusual art work. With the help of other SS I was put in touch with members of the 265th RRC, who actually used this jeep in Viet Nam. As I restored this jeep, I kept in touch with them. This past week the survivors held their annual reunion in Ft. Worth Texas. They generously invited me to join them, and bring the jeep up for all to see.

We met Saturday AM in the parking lot of a Honky Tonk, on the outskirts of the Ft. Worth Stockyards. I brought the jeep and various pieces of Viet Nam Field Equipment, including C-Rations, LRRP's, and replica Weapons. (Due to the number of civilians in the area, we kept the weapons inside the truck). After the gentlemen had had some time to look over the jeep and equipment, they took turns driving the jeep through the stockyards. Needless to say many heads turned as they saw the jeep.

While the wives for the most part stayed in the shade or took pictures of their husbands, eventually they got into the spirit as well, and a great time was had by all. We ended the day at a local BBQ Restaurant there in the stockyards. And of course it being Ft. Worth, there were Horses and Cowboys
 

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Madmedic

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Some more thoughts and info. 1st I can't really put into words how honored I was to be able to share this jeep with the gentlemen who actually drove it in Viet Nam. To see them feeling and being 18-19 years old again and remembering so many positive things about their time there was simply incredible.

I also have to thank them again for all the "STUFF" they presented me with. Challenge Coins, a Unit T-Shirt, Decals, Original Unit Patches, it was incredible. (see picts) Many of those items will be incorporated into a story board I am going to make.

As several people have noted, "YES" the gas can on the jeep is turned the wrong way. (It's EMPTY) I will turn it the right way. Also, several of the vets were able to point out holes in the body of the jeep that had been filled with bondo. Apparently those "Holes" were caused by shrapnel. Their base received a rocket attack in 1969 and one of the rockets landed on their motor pool area, flattening a truck. 3 of their jeeps (including this one) were in the area, and received shrapnel damage. (The bondo is coming out at some point)

At the reunion we discussed the fact that this jeep was a true radio jeep. My original plan was to leave the jeep plain. Well plans change. I have put back almost all the correct radios, antennas, speakers etc. I still need to get a R442 Radio to complete it. In the pictures you will see a headset unit plugged into the radio, a hand set and a set of head phones off to the side. According to the guys, they used the head set system the most. But did use the others as well. They used a map case bag to keep the spare stuff when no in use. NOT A SINGLE HOLE was drilled by me to remount this equipment. Apparently they also had a KY 8 encoder system in the last space between the radios and the back antenna. Talk about looking for a unicorn.
 

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Mullaney

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Some more thoughts and info. 1st I can't really put into words how honored I was to be able to share this jeep with the gentlemen who actually drove it in Viet Nam. To see them feeling and being 18-19 years old again and remembering so many positive things about their time there was simply incredible.

I also have to thank them again for all the "STUFF" they presented me with. Challenge Coins, a Unit T-Shirt, Decals, Original Unit Patches, it was incredible. (see picts) Many of those items will be incorporated into a story board I am going to make.

As several people have noted, "YES" the gas can on the jeep is turned the wrong way. (It's EMPTY) I will turn it the right way. Also, several of the vets were able to point out holes in the body of the jeep that had been filled with bondo. Apparently those "Holes" were caused by shrapnel. Their base received a rocket attack in 1969 and one of the rockets landed on their motor pool area, flattening a truck. 3 of their jeeps (including this one) were in the area, and received shrapnel damage. (The bondo is coming out at some point)

At the reunion we discussed the fact that this jeep was a true radio jeep. My original plan was to leave the jeep plain. Well plans change. I have put back almost all the correct radios, antennas, speakers etc. I still need to get a R442 Radio to complete it. In the pictures you will see a headset unit plugged into the radio, a hand set and a set of head phones off to the side. According to the guys, they used the head set system the most. But did use the others as well. They used a map case bag to keep the spare stuff when no in use. NOT A SINGLE HOLE was drilled by me to remount this equipment. Apparently they also had a KY 8 encoder system in the last space between the radios and the back antenna. Talk about looking for a unicorn.
.
Thank you for applying your skills to the jeep that you rebuilt. Thanks for supporting their reunion and lighting up the eyes and faces of the men who drove and survived in the service of our country. Even though the public back then didn't welcome them back with open arms - those of us here THANK THEM for their service!
 

sue

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Some more thoughts and info. 1st I can't really put into words how honored I was to be able to share this jeep with the gentlemen who actually drove it in Viet Nam. To see them feeling and being 18-19 years old again and remembering so many positive things about their time there was simply incredible.

I also have to thank them again for all the "STUFF" they presented me with. Challenge Coins, a Unit T-Shirt, Decals, Original Unit Patches, it was incredible. (see picts) Many of those items will be incorporated into a story board I am going to make.

As several people have noted, "YES" the gas can on the jeep is turned the wrong way. (It's EMPTY) I will turn it the right way. Also, several of the vets were able to point out holes in the body of the jeep that had been filled with bondo. Apparently those "Holes" were caused by shrapnel. Their base received a rocket attack in 1969 and one of the rockets landed on their motor pool area, flattening a truck. 3 of their jeeps (including this one) were in the area, and received shrapnel damage. (The bondo is coming out at some point)

At the reunion we discussed the fact that this jeep was a true radio jeep. My original plan was to leave the jeep plain. Well plans change. I have put back almost all the correct radios, antennas, speakers etc. I still need to get a R442 Radio to complete it. In the pictures you will see a headset unit plugged into the radio, a hand set and a set of head phones off to the side. According to the guys, they used the head set system the most. But did use the others as well. They used a map case bag to keep the spare stuff when no in use. NOT A SINGLE HOLE was drilled by me to remount this equipment. Apparently they also had a KY 8 encoder system in the last space between the radios and the back antenna. Talk about looking for a unicorn.
Sometimes it’s fun to share and get a lump in your chest and hold back a tear in your eye.
 

Madmedic

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After talking to the members of the 265th some more, ,,,,, I think I can say that I am finished (almost) outfitting the jeep. (still have to get the canvas top) But all COMS gear is now installed. Including a Chinese Back Pack Type Field Radio, like those used by the NVA and Viet Cong in Viet Nam. One of the 265th's Primary duties was to monitor and decipher enemy radio communications. They did that using captured radio equipment. The guys went on to say they normally carried this type of Radio Coms gear, plus field phones, and the splitters that connected the field phones to the radios. They also usually carried a case of C-Rations underneath the back seat in case they were in the field for an extended period of time. Reading Materials were common for the slack times,.
 

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