M1101 tongue modification and height adjustable

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dmark4u

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M1101 tongue modification and height adjustable and LINE-X

Hello everyone I ran into a problem I'm sure many of you had before. My M1101 was way too high for my truck and I didn't want one of those large plate receivers so I basically removed the entire pintle and surge break setup and welded on an adjustable height mounting hitch that can accept pintle or ball. I have attached some pictures as well.
Parts cost me $80 and I did the welding myself.

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John Galt

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Are you still running the 37s? Seems like a lot of drop. There was a guy on SS that un bolted the axle, trimmed the spacer plate, drilled new holes, then remounted the axle a few inches closer to frame.
 

dmark4u

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Im running the 37s I calculated the force on the drop and it way under the capable weight. I have 2 trucks one is much higher then the other and I also lend my trailer to several of my friends
So that way was perfect for me as its capable of 9 inches up or down.
 

FloridaAKM

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When you put many minds to a task, some one can come up with a solution to fix almost anything. Thanks for your posting those new ideas. I don't like losing the surge brakes capability due to towing this trailer with a Toyota Tacoma 4X4 sometimes. The Deuce doesn't even know its back there as I leave the trailers stock for future projects if need be.
 

dmark4u

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I got the entire trailer coated with LINE-X not sure what the final cost is didn't get the invoice yet but it came out looking pretty good
I always coat all my trailer due to the insane amount of salt the city uses here during winter.

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jpg

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My CUCV's brakes are not sufficient to run the trailer without its brakes. Even if your tow vehicle has sufficient brakes, on slick roads, trailer brakes can make a huge difference in controlling your rig. On my first road trip with the M1101 I had to make a panic stop on an interstate due to an idiot. I was a little worried that the trailer might misbehave, but the surge brake system worked perfectly. The trailer stayed aligned behind the tow vehicle even when I had to stand on the brakes. I was nervously watching it in the mirror, but it never hinted at misbehaving.

I really don't recommend disabling the braking system. If an accident happened, the lawyers would have a field day, even if the disabled brakes had nothing to do with it.

I put smaller CUCV wheels on my M1101 to make it ride level with my CUCV. That way, the truck and trailer all use the same wheels, and one spare can serve both vehicles.
 

SuburbanReject

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Ok, this one is the best hitch mod I have ever seen that won't "paint you into any corner" that I can tell!

Sir, I have a welder and do my own welding and would really appreciate it if you could you list every item you had to purchase and a brief break-down of the procedure?

Thank you.
 

Gunzy

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I'm with jpg on this one. I would never recommend the removal of a braking system on any trailer that is equipped with them. Those brakes WILL save your back side some day. Your mod should have kept the surge brakes. I hope it doesn't cost you or one of your friends in the end.
 

KansasBobcat

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I'm with jpg on this one. I would never recommend the removal of a braking system on any trailer that is equipped with them. Those brakes WILL save your back side some day. Your mod should have kept the surge brakes. I hope it doesn't cost you or one of your friends in the end.
I agree. I even safety wire the hooks on the safety chains
 

98G

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All the badness that comes along with a drop hitch on the truck has just been moved rearward to the trailer.

Given that the OP's fab job is indestructible, the force is transferred to the hitch differently, and different leverage is applied, specifically forward twisting forces at the ball.

Not only that, but the amount of force transferred has been greatly increased by disabling the surge brakes. If we accept the premise that the towing vehicle is capable of braking it, there's still the issue that we've stressed the tow vehicle/trailer interface. ....
 

dmark4u

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I see most are worried about removal of surge brakes I'm a structural engineer with 15 years experience in bridge designs. I assure all of you that I did every single calculation and my design is fully safe and I have a safety factor of 5 times max trailer weight. If you drive safely and don't tailgate you don't need surge brake with this trailer weight if you over load it then that's a different story.
Surge brakes also often malfunction and cause accidents themselves. This is my personal opinion and to each there own this setup has worked perfectly for my needs and I like a said I have done every single calculation so if ever an accident happened I have all approved designs to defend myself.
 

Kora

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In terms of structural property, one must consider the torsional load at the home made bracket, vertically as well as laterally. Further, all of the applied loads on to it in the real world conditions are dynamic load opposed to a static load one may assume. The stress level on to such members are much higher than on a statically loaded members. On top of that, all elements and members around the modified "A" frame are subject to cyclic load and fatigue stress in addition to the static hitch ball load. As we all know, the fatigue failure can occur under very low stress level.
I respect military engineers and their design integrity, and I consider modifications to their design very seriously.
This is only my own thoughts.
 

SuburbanReject

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On the subject of "trailer brakes", I can't speak for the real world requirements, applications, pros vs. cons, etc with regards to military trailers because 1.) I never served & 2.) my M1101 is the first military trailer I have ever dealt with.

All that being said, my own logic tells me: If the Surge Brake System was so good and so safe, cost effective, and easy to repair with endless spare parts to be found all over, then why over the years has the overwhelming vast majority of civilian trailers kept electrical braking systems as the mainstay?

In my case, the first thing I did was remove mine because it was just one more system that added potential future problems. Besides, I live in South Texas where it's flat with no steep roads and never have had to haul anything over 1000 lbs (and probably never will)...The minute one both of those change is when I'll upgrade to electric brakes.

"SAFETY" is one of those very relative terms.
 

98G

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What's the minimum stopping distance with the trailer brakes intact, from 85mph?

What's the minimum stopping distance from 85mph with the trailer brakes disabled?

What are the twisting forces on the truck frame/hitch interface without the modification, and what are the twisting forces after modification?

What is the forward twisting force on the ball at maximum brake application prior to the modification, and afterwards?

I'm not an engineer and I can't put numbers on it, but I can tell you for certain that the stopping distance has increased , and that the twisting forces have been greatly increased.

Likely the increase in twisting forces isn't enough to break anything.

The increased stopping distance won't be an issue, unless you ever need that additional 40 feet (my best guess).

Driving safely and not tailgating is all well and good, but it won't prevent that idiot from pulling out in front of you.

If you can put actual numbers on it, please do so. I'd like to know how close my 40' guess is...
 

quickfarms

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I have never heard of a surge brake malfunctioning and causing an accident unless you are referring to it binding up or being locked out and not applying the brakes.

Surge brakes are the preferred method for medium size rental trailers because the do not rely on the towing vehicle having a controller.

The trailer manufactures are using electric brakes because they are a cheaper way to meet the dot requirements.

Electric brakes are not recommended for off-road applications.

I have never seen electric brakes on a boat trailer.

One must remember that the op is located in Canada and is subject to different laws than those of us in the states.

In the states these trailers have a GVW that requires brakes in most places.

The lawyers will have a field day with you if you get into a serious accident and you are towing a trailer that the brakes were removed, regardless of weather this caused the accident.
 

DeadParrot

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oklahoma city, ok
On the subject of "trailer brakes", I can't speak for the real world requirements, applications, pros vs. cons, etc with regards to military trailers because 1.) I never served & 2.) my M1101 is the first military trailer I have ever dealt with.

All that being said, my own logic tells me: If the Surge Brake System was so good and so safe, cost effective, and easy to repair with endless spare parts to be found all over, then why over the years has the overwhelming vast majority of civilian trailers kept electrical braking systems as the mainstay?

In my case, the first thing I did was remove mine because it was just one more system that added potential future problems. Besides, I live in South Texas where it's flat with no steep roads and never have had to haul anything over 1000 lbs (and probably never will)...The minute one both of those change is when I'll upgrade to electric brakes.

"SAFETY" is one of those very relative terms.

Somewhere in the TM specifications is an entry for 'fording depth' which for the 1101 series is around 4' or more IIRC. So the body of the trailer can be fully submerged and still be operating within specifications. It is much easier to design a pressurized hydraulic system to keep water out then it is to keep an electrical gizmo dry under 4' of water. And every civilian trailer I have worked with has electrical issues as the top problem. Needless to say, I kept the stock brakes on my 1101.
 

Gunzy

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Here in Utah if a trailer is built with brakes (electric, surge, or air) and they are disable, removed or modified the trailer is no longer legal for road use. I am sure many states are the same and that's not even taking into account Federal DOT regulations that pertain to trailer braking systems.
 
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