M35 vs M135 axles for 4x4 project

Michael

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I was approached today by someone wanting deuce axles for a 4x4 project he was working on. I told him I didn't have any M35 axles but did have a M135 that I might part with. He didn't have a clue to what I was talking about but still wants to come look at them. Anybody have any thoughts on the suitability of M135 axles or would he be better off finding the more common M35 axles so he can find the rest of the stuff to make it work?

Also what is the going price for m135 axles?

I did a search and found one note that the M135 axles are not as strong. I also found a price of $100 for axles and $300 for a whole truck. That seem too cheep to me considering the price of scrap now and the increase in demand by people using these parts in their 4x4's.
 

Michael

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I guess I might as well ask if anybody has the axles he wants or a M35 parts truck for sale within a reasonable distance of Tupelo, MS? The closest place I can think of is Tracy City, TN
 

DDoyle

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Naturally I got rid of my parts truck a couple months ago - since I'm a couple hours from Tupelo.

Give Memphis Equipment a call - that should get you some price ideas.

DD
 

Michael

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I would guess that Memphis Equipment would want about $1200 or more per axle. :)

It was a friend of a friend's son that is wanting this.
 

Barrman

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Aren't the M135 axles side loading? Along with the fact that the front turns "backwards" compared to what any modern transfer case will spin the front drive shaft?

I am not a 135 educated person. Those two things above have been pointed out to me before though and I though I would pass it along.
 

Michael

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the M135 axles side loading? Along with the fact that the front turns "backwards" compared to what any modern transfer case will spin the front drive shaft?
What does "side loading" mean? I do know you wouldn't want to use the M135 transfer case since it is single speed.
 

JasonS

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I have read that they are actually stronger(?) The front differential can be rotated 180 degrees for normal drive rotation. All that said, they do seem to be much less desireable. All of mine ended up scrapped; nobody wanted them.
 

mucekok

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i use the m35 toploader axles under my 4x4 projects... they are much stronger but be advised to stay away from the ones that were mfd by timken. stay with the ones that say rockwell on the data plate. by the way, i have a set here in tx for sale, $1000 for a front and rear. will even throw in a set of drive flanges and lug nuts.
 

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chevycrew

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If it's still there, the easiest way to identify which style front axle you've found is by the tag. If the tag says Timken, then it's an older undesirable model with either the Bendix- or Rezepa-type shaft. If the tag says Rockwell, then it's got Spicer-type shafts.
This is according to jp magazine.

The u-joint style is said to be the strongest, with replaceable joint, that came in rockwell axles.

The 2 axles on the right came in the timken housings



Please correct if anyone knows otherwise.
 

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Recovry4x4

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The ball axles are not exclusive to the Timkens nor are the ujoint axles exclusive to the Rockwells. I got a pair of Timkens from a friend becuse he couldn't sell them. Lucky me, the front had ujoint axle. With that said, I've been unable to break the ball section of the ball axles. I have both right now!
 

M543A2

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My experience with the two types of trucks says by all means use the M35 Rockwell type of axles. The GMC axles have ball bearings on the pinion shaft where the M35 axles use Timken bearings. The axle shafts in the Rockwell axles are also much tougher. We were comparing the hardness of GMC and Rockwell axles by using a center punch on the side of the shaft. The GMC axles would have a center punch mark on them while the Rockwells blunted the end of the punch. I have twisted off GMC M135 axles and have had the ball bearing mounted pinion fail in military trucks.
Regards Marti
 

M543A2

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JP magazine is not right in making the broad statement that Rockwells do not have the Rezeppa type joint in them. All of the trucks we have (deuces and 5 tons) with Rockwells have Rezeppas in them. We at times have put these axles through severe torque loading with no Rezeppa failures.
Regards Marti Sacks
 

OPCOM

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The joint shown in the center, Rezeppa, do not jerk the wheel back and forth when making a turn. They are alco called constant velocity joints. I would prefer them for my own use, very limited offroading.
 

spicergear

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The M135's have the differential that drops out of them like the Ford 9" rears do...similiar to the Rockwells but they drop out the front or rear of the axlehousing not the top like the standard Rockwell housings that we have in your deuce trucks.

They run the front backwards. That can be remedied but work has to be done...I'm not sure what all but it's not as simple as flipping the chunk 180* in the housing.

I also had the 'ball' style axle in my '53 REO which had a busted axle. It busted the outer shaft NOT the joint. Don't be so swayed by the nay sayers about the ball style. The only real problem is *if* they break, which any axle joint can...depending on stresses, there's more collateral damage from the release of the joint parts instead of just busting a U-joint.

Rockwells are MUCH easier to use. It doesn't matter which way the pumpkin is put in it will still drive the same. Just make sure there's enough clearance for suspension travel and chunk to oil pan clearance and you'll be fine.

Sorry to not help sell the M135 axles...but the wheels are worth more.
 

Michael

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I really wasn't wanting to be bothered with selling them, but I hated to blow him off for no reason. It does sound like it isn't what he is looking for unless I drop my price and he is wanting to get by on the cheep. I priced them for $300 each. It sounds like that is a little high. I would think that the M135 axles would be better than 1 ton pickup axles wouldn't they or is the deference not worth the trouble?
 

Alexander

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I while back a spoke to the guy that runs ALFA HEAVEN INC and he runs the 135 style axles in truck/tractor pull competitions (I think). He says that the 135 axles are far stronger. I'm not sure exactly why, so you might want to give him a call.
 

JasonS

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The 4x4 truck pullers use the GMC axles up here too. I asked one of them if they had ever broken any; no. Their reasons for using them may be more due to clearance. The rockwell differential is probably too tall.

An extremely hard axle shaft is not necessarily what you want. A more ductile shaft will bend and rebound instead of break. I have owned two M35s and two M135s. Both had an equal number of loose pinion bearings.
 

Trango

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I have read that the front axleshaft insert is not equal, side-to-side, on the front M135 carrier. Therefore, if you were to rotate the front chunk to be spun correctly by a modern transfer case, one shaft has to be cut down, and perhaps the other would need to be lengthened... or you may be ok with partial engagement into the side gear.

Not sure, just repeating what I've read.

Oh yes, and another big difference? Absolute necessary lift for each - you need about 8 more inches for the M35 axles, since the pinion is so much higher in the later toploader axles.

BTW, speaking of which, my rear-steer buggy suddenly isn't starting, and the replacement junker fuel pump I put in isn't working either... out to the garage. :(
 
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