MEP-003A Facet Fuel Pump Electrical Lead Question (inline fuse?)

jaws4518

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Is this a special type fuse attach to each Facet fuel pump? I can't find any information on this part in the TM. Obviously, it is an OEM part of the Facet pump assembly. I damaged the one on my auxiliary fuel pump. They are filled with light oil. Looks like some type of explosive proof fuse to me.

Q: What can I replace it with? Or just replace the fuel pump?


If I have to replace the aux pump, what should I go with? Any recommendations? I see a wide price range on similar type pumps. I'm not going to pay 200+ for a new pump. :x
 

jamawieb

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It's not a fuse. It's a capacitor that you do not need. Cut it out and splice the wires together. It's what the military uses so the pumps electrical current does not interfere with sensitive electronics. It does not effect anything with our use.
 

Light in the Dark

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Are you talking about the 'brick' that is in-line from the slip connector, to the pump itself? If so, that is an EMI filter for use around sensitive radio equipment. For civilian use, by and large you do NOT need it (though its nice to have). If your pumps are 'dead', you can disconnect the pump at that sleeve connection, and cut the EMI filter right out. You then can reconnect the wire from the slip fit to the pump (do so in a nice secure way, as water tight as you can). Then retest the pump... it just might work! That EMI filter has given false-dead frustrations to many folks. Try that first.
 

jaws4518

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Yes, that's it! I could not find any explanation for what it was. Yeah, my pumps need a thorough cleaning. The aux pump had a bunch of rusty dry scale inside the strainer. It has probably never been used. The other primary and secondary were so dirty, I can't believe the generator even ran. I've had it for 2 years and just now started going through everything.

Do you recommend cutting out the other two? If they are subject to failure then I will do it.

Many thanks!
 

Chainbreaker

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...Do you recommend cutting out the other two? If they are subject to failure then I will do it.
The capacitors do fail but I would not call them a high failure component. All 3 of my gensets still have them intact and all are working fine. I'm of the mindset, if it ain't broke don't fix it. However, some people might consider removing them a preventative measure towards higher reliability. Its really your call, if you have the time now and the tools materials already out to do it why not? Otherwise, I would not worry about it.
 

jamawieb

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Usually, they will short to ground when they fail, which in turns pops the DC breaker on the front panel. Just keep that in the back of your mind. They will usually fail when you really need the genset to work.
 

Light in the Dark

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Yes, that's it! I could not find any explanation for what it was. Yeah, my pumps need a thorough cleaning. The aux pump had a bunch of rusty dry scale inside the strainer. It has probably never been used. The other primary and secondary were so dirty, I can't believe the generator even ran. I've had it for 2 years and just now started going through everything.

Do you recommend cutting out the other two? If they are subject to failure then I will do it.

Many thanks!
I would mark which wire goes with which pump (either primary or auxiliary) and test them one at a time with the filters in place. Plug in first primary pump and turn to prime... if its silent, turn off, unplug the connector, and do the removal. Plug same unit back into properly marked lead, and turn start switch again to see if she runs. Do this for all three. No sense in cutting out a good EMI filter.

If you somehow mismark the three input power lines, you can easily test them with a multimeter. Two will have voltage at them when the start switch is set to 'primary', and one will have no voltage (if you turn to aux setting, this plug should then become energized). Have fun, take your time, and label carefully!
 

Light in the Dark

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And it is possible that the pump is just dead. I got a Tier 2 MEP-002 with under 20 hours that all three were dead. How about them apples? I actually replaced all three with new Facet correct pumps (with EMI filter), and a month later, the negative battery cable (I have a disconnect) broke and sent a huge ripple through the DC circuit, blowing all three brand new EMI filters. Not a happy camper. Do take your time, and be diligent in labeling. Just going to have to do it again if you aren't.
 

Guyfang

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I would mark which wire goes with which pump (either primary or auxiliary) and test them one at a time with the filters in place. Plug in first primary pump and turn to prime... if its silent, turn off, unplug the connector, and do the removal. Plug same unit back into properly marked lead, and turn start switch again to see if she runs. Do this for all three. No sense in cutting out a good EMI filter.

If you somehow mismark the three input power lines, you can easily test them with a multimeter. Two will have voltage at them when the start switch is set to 'primary', and one will have no voltage (if you turn to aux setting, this plug should then become energized). Have fun, take your time, and label carefully!

Dont forget, that the wires are marked. The wire numbers are on the wire, and on the wire diagram, on top of the control cube. Simply check, and you will know!!
 
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