MEP80x Load Meter with Electric Oven Load Bank

Zed254

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I've got an MEP-803A and an MEP-802A that will run for hours at 100% on the Per Cent Rated Current meter supplying power to my electric stove 'Load Bank'. When I bump them up to say 107% they will trip out on Over Load in around 15 minutes.

I've been researching the forum and have found several folks saying that with a resistive load the % Rated Current meter needs to be divided by .8 to show actual current. If so, this means my 100% reading is actually 125% of 5kw for the 802 and the 107% is actually ~134% of the rated 5kw. Is my understanding correct? Attached image is my 'Load Bank' set up.
Load Bank.jpg
Thanks,
 

Dwnorton1

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My stove load bank will pull around 42fla at 1PF of resistive load which equates to around 54fla at .8PF 108ish% my 803's capacity. My overload will occasionally trip if I leave all burners and oven on high with door open. Still have not cleaned AM/VM switch. I like to set them at various temps so the cycle on and of stimulating a reactive load. If your 802 will handle the full load of the stove(and its same as mine) I am impressed.
 

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Zed254

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OH, no. Not the 802. The 803 gets a meter reading of 100% when everything is on...well, broil, 4 eyes, and a warming tray. With the 802 it's more like bake and 2 small eyes to register 100% on the current meter. I like your idea of adjusting the eyes: I've been putting everything on 100%.

I'm just confused regarding what that current meter is showing. I understand the units are derated by 80%. That just means there's a 20% reserve of electrical power if needed. Then I read you take the current meter reading and divide by .8 to find out your actual power consumption because the stove is a resistive load. I thought if my current meter is reading 100% that means the stove is pulling 5kw out of the generator in the case of the 802.
 

csheath

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That meter ain't worth the time it takes to look at it. Use a good amp meter to determine actual load. My 803 would remain running with the load meter pegged.
 

Dwnorton1

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In all seriousness, they are under rated so even at severe elevations they would likely be able to output name plate rating. IMO. My meter is nowhere near accurate. Thought about seeing if I could get one that reads correctly, then I though meh not important to me. Most time I know what load I am putting on it, if unknown load I put my amp clamp on it.
 

DieselAddict

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You're best bet is to use a amp meter you know works. Once you know how the gauges on the unit read you can use them for general readings to understand whats going on. I wouldn't trust on any of them for accuracy.
 

Suprman

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I have a mil air conditioner with big heater coil I use to load test. The heater runs the gen at around 85%, 55% for the ac running. A nice 2 hour run on heat usually blows out any built up carbon.
 

Zed254

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Thanks for all the input. Clearly, I need to invest in an amp meter: I do not own one. Once I get it I will be able to answer my own question regarding the performance of my generators. And I may have time to cook myself up a batch of cookies next time I fire up my stove instead of worrying about that current meter!!!!
 

Daybreak

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Howdy,
Not all generator heads are built the same. The military spec gen head is a power factor .8

In single phase and using 240 loads resistive is the easiest to balance and load a unit.

You can run through this thread and watch some of the video's running the MEP-802 and MEP-803

Acquired a Military surplus load bank
 

csheath

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Thanks for all the input. Clearly, I need to invest in an amp meter: I do not own one. Once I get it I will be able to answer my own question regarding the performance of my generators. And I may have time to cook myself up a batch of cookies next time I fire up my stove instead of worrying about that current meter!!!!
Harbor Freight sells an inexpensive 7 function Clamp-On Digital Multimeter for $16.99 that has a peak hold function. They also have two others that do not have the peak hold function so make sure and get the 7 function model if you go that route. The one I bought read about 4 amps low compared to a high dollar Fluke. Ironically the Fluke did not have a peak hold function.
 

Guyfang

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Unles you are into fixing gen sets, why buy a meter? The old saw, " Close enough for government work" is a fine rule for most to use when working out loads. Always keeping in mind, that if you are working on the limits of your machine, you better expect to have an overload. If you are running red line, you got the wrong size set. It's all about load management.

On the other hand, if you are going into the gen repair mode, by all means, get a good amp meter, with every bell and whistle you can afford. There are very good tools out there, and the prices have never been lower. If there is enough interest out there, maybe we should star a thread on handy tools/test equipment to get, and, handy things you can make yourself.
 

novaman

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If there is enough interest out there, maybe we should star a thread on handy tools/test equipment to get, and, handy things you can make yourself.[/QUOTE]

Yes that would be nice. Basically I've only ever used a Fluke mm with an amp clamp. not sure what else there would be but handy things are always handy
 

Guyfang

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One example is a relay tester. The stupid plastic relays. They are in theory easy to test. Apply voltage to A1 and A2. the contacts reverse, when it works right. BUT, try doing the test. Its an extremely large PITA. The good lord didnt give me enough hands to accomplish the mission. How can you hold 24 volts on A1 and A2, and use an ohm meter to see if the contacts change? Just try it one time. And making a bunch of wires up to test one, is ok, but soon the wires are lost, or used for something else.

So what I used to do is get me a relay socket. I mounted them on C ration cans, (this is revealing my age) and wire up some very small lights to it, along with two test points I scrounged. I made the normally closed contacts red, the normally open contacts amber. I used two multimeter leads with roach clips to connect it to 24 volts, via the test points. I installed the same test points on all my different test equipment. That way, all I needed to do is grab some leads, and what ever home made test equipment I needed.

I installed a small push button switch to energize A1 and A2. Plug in the relay. Hook up the leads. Red lights should come on, if the relay is good. Push the switch, the red lights go out, the amber came on. What could be simpler? Easy to make, and in today's world, LEDs are a fantastic idea. Much smaller and easy to work with.

The normal joe doesn't need something like this. He can make it, and it is a great tool, but someone who fixes gen sets to sell, shouldn't leave home without one!

I made all this stuff in C rat cans, because when you are on 24 hour duty, and don't have anything to do, you get creative! I then soldered a C rat can top, to the bottom of my tester, to keep out the dirt, or some fools finger. Later, when I was doing Patriot power generation, I mounted all this stuff on a work bench. I made a 28 volt power supply to power all my toys. It was a great way to learn about electrical stuff, and practice soldering and electro theory. I almost burnt my work bench up with the first version power supply. It was a valuable lesson. Fuses. You leave out fuses, at your own peril.

There is bound to be people out there that have a spare parts gen set. Or simply buy two sockets. Don't forget the AC volt switch, (S16?) or what ever it is. There is no end of the toys you can make.
 

csheath

Active member
659
27
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One example is a relay tester. The stupid plastic relays. They are in theory easy to test. Apply voltage to A1 and A2. the contacts reverse, when it works right. BUT, try doing the test. Its an extremely large PITA. The good lord didnt give me enough hands to accomplish the mission. How can you hold 24 volts on A1 and A2, and use an ohm meter to see if the contacts change? Just try it one time. And making a bunch of wires up to test one, is ok, but soon the wires are lost, or used for something else.

So what I used to do is get me a relay socket. I mounted them on C ration cans, (this is revealing my age) and wire up some very small lights to it, along with two test points I scrounged. I made the normally closed contacts red, the normally open contacts amber. I used two multimeter leads with roach clips to connect it to 24 volts, via the test points. I installed the same test points on all my different test equipment. That way, all I needed to do is grab some leads, and what ever home made test equipment I needed.

I installed a small push button switch to energize A1 and A2. Plug in the relay. Hook up the leads. Red lights should come on, if the relay is good. Push the switch, the red lights go out, the amber came on. What could be simpler? Easy to make, and in today's world, LEDs are a fantastic idea. Much smaller and easy to work with.

The normal joe doesn't need something like this. He can make it, and it is a great tool, but someone who fixes gen sets to sell, shouldn't leave home without one!

I made all this stuff in C rat cans, because when you are on 24 hour duty, and don't have anything to do, you get creative! I then soldered a C rat can top, to the bottom of my tester, to keep out the dirt, or some fools finger. Later, when I was doing Patriot power generation, I mounted all this stuff on a work bench. I made a 28 volt power supply to power all my toys. It was a great way to learn about electrical stuff, and practice soldering and electro theory. I almost burnt my work bench up with the first version power supply. It was a valuable lesson. Fuses. You leave out fuses, at your own peril.

There is bound to be people out there that have a spare parts gen set. Or simply buy two sockets. Don't forget the AC volt switch, (S16?) or what ever it is. There is no end of the toys you can make.
What's a roach clip? :naner:
 

Daybreak

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There is bound to be people out there that have a spare parts gen set. Or simply buy two sockets. Don't forget the AC volt switch, (S16?) or what ever it is. There is no end of the toys you can make.
Howdy,
I have the remnants of the control panel box. So I guess I can make something up. :naner:
 
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