New deuce owner seeking advice

frank8003

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And from 2013... see post 3
may have to put this into google to find it
 

fasttruck

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Greasing drive shafts: placing both the transfer case and transmission in neutral will allow you to rotate the driveshaft to access the grease points. If the drive shafts are correctly assembled all 3 grease fittings should face the same way. Jack up one of the front wheels will allow you to rotate the front drive shaft to access those fittings. That leaves the 3 in between the rear tandem to fight with. It might be necessary to have "soldier b" gentle move the truck to rotate these fittings into view. You only have to move the vehicle inches to rotate the drive shaft 1/2 a revolution. If you haven't already found them; the check plug for the transmission is on the left side of the box and the one for the transfer cased is just below the front axle driveshaft facing the front of the unit. Check the LO, transfer cases don't take a lot of oil.
 

fasttruck

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Not only the 3 in between the axles but also the drive shaft between the transfer case and the intermediate axle. There are a total of 12 grease fittings associated with the 4 drive shafts on the truck. The handbrake on the back of the transfer case will have 4 fittings of its' own. Drive on.
 

fasttruck

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Reference post 104: both transmission, transfer, and all 3 differentials were issued with 1/2" square pipe ends for plugs so you need a 1/2" breaker bar or drive to open and close them. 5 tons have a square plug, commonly found on commercial trucks, that takes a 15/16" open end wrench to turn.
 

kamikaze850

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get some ebay tires, 50$ each, shipping will cost a bunch though. ndts are decent, if anything you can just make a set of tire chains. id get a 3/8 chain and wrap it on the outside tire through the hand holes but careful with the valve stem..
 

71DeuceAK

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Welcome, and hello from another Southeast Alaska member! I remember POW well, even the NAPA in Craig didn't have that wide of a selection in terms of filters, etc. They did however have the most amazing full-service True Value.

Truck looks like it has solid bones, good save! I commend you for rescuing it as opposed to just writing it off as more rusting iron.
 

frank8003

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Reading thru my notes I found interesting filter and grease data for you to read.

"
Testing revealed that BLG provided excellent field performance compared to the G-version grease. The testers observed no sign of biodegradation in the lubrication systems during operation, indicating that BLG products will only biodegrade under certain environmental conditions. To assess this experimental BLG, a field biodegradation test was conducted at the bioremediation site at Fort Hood. The BLG test results clearly showed more rapid biodegradability, which occurred within a 6-month period, compared to G-version grease, which showed extremely slow biodegradability for many years.

In 2008, the MILSPEC was revised to accept BLG as the GAA grease. The revised GAA specification, MIL-PRF-10924H, included an additional biodegradation test and a higher acceptance limit for load-carrying capacity than the MIL-PRF-10924G standard. As a result, BLG officially became a new “green” GAA military product.

While BLG’s formulation is not the same as the old G-version GAA grease, they are comparable in performance and fully compatible. Existing G-version GAA grease can be easily changed over to BLG without needing to extensively clean the lubrication system. During the changeover period, both greases can be used in Army vehicles and equipment until the G-version GAA grease is exhausted."
 

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Dipstick

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Reading thru my notes I found interesting filter and grease data for you to read.

"
Testing revealed that BLG provided excellent field performance compared to the G-version grease. The testers observed no sign of biodegradation in the lubrication systems during operation, indicating that BLG products will only biodegrade under certain environmental conditions. To assess this experimental BLG, a field biodegradation test was conducted at the bioremediation site at Fort Hood. The BLG test results clearly showed more rapid biodegradability, which occurred within a 6-month period, compared to G-version grease, which showed extremely slow biodegradability for many years.

In 2008, the MILSPEC was revised to accept BLG as the GAA grease. The revised GAA specification, MIL-PRF-10924H, included an additional biodegradation test and a higher acceptance limit for load-carrying capacity than the MIL-PRF-10924G standard. As a result, BLG officially became a new “green” GAA military product.

While BLG’s formulation is not the same as the old G-version GAA grease, they are comparable in performance and fully compatible. Existing G-version GAA grease can be easily changed over to BLG without needing to extensively clean the lubrication system. During the changeover period, both greases can be used in Army vehicles and equipment until the G-version GAA grease is exhausted."
I'm answering you Frank! I don't even worry about all the military spec stuff myself except for the viscosity needs. I use Shell Rotella T-4 engine oil. If it can lube a 600 hp Caterpillar, it can protect my 140 hp LDT just fine. As for grease, I use Valvoline "Cerulean". It's made for large car axle bearings, king pins, chassis, universal joints, and it even states mining, crushers and vibratory rollers. It also says that it is tacky (which it is) and has excellent resistance to water washout. It's blue, so it's easy to see the new grease forcing the old out. Another benefit is that I can pick it up at Auto Zone. I have full confidence in it's ability to lube and protect Brutus. Thanks for your post by the way. I will read your pdfs for sure.
 

Dipstick

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Couldn't get rid of my ndt's fast enough - I hated the things.
I'm curious about NDTs. My Deuce came with 11-20 Firestone T-831 radials, so I've never experienced driving on NDTs before. What specifically are the qualities of NDT tires that caused you to hate them?
 

Dipstick

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Welcome, and hello from another Southeast Alaska member! I remember POW well, even the NAPA in Craig didn't have that wide of a selection in terms of filters, etc. They did however have the most amazing full-service True Value.

Truck looks like it has solid bones, good save! I commend you for rescuing it as opposed to just writing it off as more rusting iron.
I converted all my filters to spin-ons seven years ago. The benefit is that I can go to NAPA anytime and get the NAPA or Wix oil and fuel filters I need. Spin-ons are one of the best things a new Deuce owner can spend his money on. As a side benefit the oil pressure comes up in half the time it does with stock filters.
 

Jacob2027

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Sorry for not trplying. Got super busy moved to a new town and just started two jobs. Still trying to find a place to live. Got most of it fixed up. Had her driving. At this point it is getting specialty tools I didn't have access to and parts like wheel bearings. May br later in winter before I get back to it though. Thanks for all the help. I used lucas red and tacky for the grease and don't remember oil brand only that it was specced right.
 

Dipstick

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My end goal is to swap to 12.00r20s on solid rim running singles in the back. Intertubs seem to cost a pretty penny when going up in size. All rims are currently stock. The steer tires and spare are the stock tires. Drivers are bigger though. Not sure how big of an issue it is to run 10.00r20 in the rear and 9.00r20 in the front. If not to big of an issue moght run that for a little while. The split rims don't intimidate me. The over all tire price does...
It's not a good idea to run tires of different outside diameters on an all wheel drive vehicle. All three differentials carry the same 6.72:1 gears. The overall tire diameter/height affects how fast the gears will be turning for any given road speed. As a practical matter, you want all three differentials (when the forward axle is engaged) turning at the same speed relative to the road speed. This reduces the strain on the entire drive-line. The simplest thing to do in your case would be to replace the two front tires with ones that match the tires on the rear axle. Also, Bias-Ply and Radial tires have completely different handling characteristics. So it's always best to go with all radials (better) or all Bias-Ply tires. The first thing I would do is measure the front and rear tires to see if their diameter/height is the same or not. This will give you a place to start your tire selection with. Never use retreads on the steering axle. I believe DOT forbids it, but in any case it is not safe to do so. I hope I'm not telling you stuff you already know. If I am.......sorry.
 

Jacob2027

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Southeast alaska
It's not a good idea to run tires of different outside diameters on an all wheel drive vehicle. All three differentials carry the same 6.72:1 gears. The overall tire diameter/height affects how fast the gears will be turning for any given road speed. As a practical matter, you want all three differentials (when the forward axle is engaged) turning at the same speed relative to the road speed. This reduces the strain on the entire drive-line. The simplest thing to do in your case would be to replace the two front tires with ones that match the tires on the rear axle. Also, Bias-Ply and Radial tires have completely different handling characteristics. So it's always best to go with all radials (better) or all Bias-Ply tires. The first thing I would do is measure the front and rear tires to see if their diameter/height is the same or not. This will give you a place to start your tire selection with. Never use retreads on the steering axle. I believe DOT forbids it, but in any case it is not safe to do so. I hope I'm not telling you stuff you already know. If I am.......sorry.
The tires being the same i knew about. Already got them swapped. Didn't know there was anything other than radials. So that is interesting. As for retreads there is a lot of misinformation. Dit firbids retreads as steer tires for buses. They are legal on any ither vehicle. And from everything I have been told (by loggers) run just as well as new tires.
 

Dipstick

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The tires being the same i knew about. Already got them swapped. Didn't know there was anything other than radials. So that is interesting. As for retreads there is a lot of misinformation. Dit firbids retreads as steer tires for buses. They are legal on any ither vehicle. And from everything I have been told (by loggers) run just as well as new tires.
Why would you think Dot forbids the use of retreads on busses? Because they carry people not logs. Retreads do not last as long as new tires. Anyone who runs them on the steers is rolling the dice with their own life and the lives of others sharing the road. The loggers you've been talking to need their heads examined.
 

Jacob2027

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Why would you think Dot forbids the use of retreads on busses? Because they carry people not logs. Retreads do not last as long as new tires. Anyone who runs them on the steers is rolling the dice with their own life and the lives of others sharing the road. The loggers you've been talking to need their heads examined.
They also have a different load dispersal with less weight on the fronts. Buses are single Axel front and rear with singles in the front. That may have something to do with it. I also know they uses retreads on stears for semi's up here in places.
 
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