No. 6 Fuel Oil or Bunker oil as fuel

exbrown

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West Union, SC
Does anyone have any experience using No. 6 fuel oil as fuel for a deuce?

There is 6,000 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil near me for sale for $1/gallon.

It would take a lot of other fuel to mix with it to get the viscosity correct, just wondering if it would be worth the effort?
 

gimpyrobb

dumpsterlandingfromorbit!
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Number 6 fuel oil is a high-viscosity residual oil requiring preheating to 220 - 260 °F (104 - 127 °C). Residual means the material remaining after the more valuable cuts of crude oil have boiled off. The residue may contain various undesirable impurities including 2 percent water and one-half percent mineral soil. This fuel may be known as residual fuel oil (RFO), by the Navy specification of Bunker C, or by the Pacific Specification of PS-400.

Sounds like work to me. If you have a means of heating and filtering, it could be cheap fuel. I would have to go check it out anyway.
 

exbrown

Member
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Location
West Union, SC
I plan on getting a sample and seeing if it will dissolve into solution with gasoline or kerosene.

If it will dissolve into other fuels, it would may be worth looking into.
 

m816

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Chatham, NJ
It would be like trying to burn tar. It would cost more to heat it to a high enough temp just to get it through a gardenhose rath than to get it through a diesel fuel system. A costly waste of time for vehicle use I would think
 

Oldvw2

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We used to run a pair of boilers on it at the facility I work at. It took a steam heater and insulated tank to make it pumpable plus atomizing steam to preheat the burner and vaporize it enough to fire correctly. Lots of sulphur and other residuals in it too - most plants are switching away from it in the light of new boiler regulations. We also had a lot of issues with coking in the burner guns and tubes - not sure if this would become an issue with multifuel injectors.

If they could dispense it for you hot and you could mix it hot to dilute it might work but it might also be a lot of work.....

FWIW
 

wreckerman893

Possum Connoisseur
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Akenback acres near Gadsden, AL
It has been my experience that SC is tough on environmental issues (I used to be in the HAZMAT field).......once you got any usable fuel out of it you would have a pile of crud left.
There is prob a good reason this stuff is for sale at a cheap price....the owner may be trying to get rid of their libility by passing it on to someone else.

Just because something is cheap does not necessarily mean it is a bargain.

Let the buyer beware.
 

135gmc

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As a general rule, you can walk on #6 on a cool day - you'll sink, but slowly. It is loaded with all the refinery leftovers - its as close to asphalt as you can get and still call it a heating oil. Even gigantic slow speed marine diesels use a lighter oil than # 6.

Long story short --- don't even think about it.
 

tractors0130

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Joliet, Illinois
We made #6 fuel oil or bunker oil at the refinery years back, it was a blend of VTB (vacuum tower bottoms) and LCO (light cycle oil), it was black, very thick and viscous, had to keep it hot to pump it. Basically it was just thinned out tar, It has a high BTU value for burning in boilers or furnaces not well suited to burn in an engine.
 
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