NTC-400 mods

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Bighurt

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Alright I'll probably end up posting this over on The Diesel Garage but since there are a fair amount of guys with the 400 on hear I though why not.

I've heard you guys talking about swapping the buttons. I've also read guys changing the PT pump and adding a seperate fuel line to the #1 plug. I've even read guys messin' with the tamper proof throttle screw.

What I haven't read on here or elsewhere on the web is running the 400 on 100% bio.

As I start formulating plans for my project, I can't help think that no Expedition or post apocalyptic truck is true without self reliance. Coupled with photovoltic cells one of the things I hope to do is run the beast on 100% Bio, or a significant precentage.

I may even go the extra mile and convert the fuel on the road...there are guys who do that. Stop and pick up waste oil at your favortite joint specializing in fried food. Maybe not that far...

I know Ford doesn't recommend running anything over 5% in my 6.4L but the #1 in town is comprised of up to 20%. I don't really have a choice...

So anyone Bio?

And yes I realize #1 isn't better but its winter, and my truck has winter issues...
 

Burgerboy13

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Ill give you some general information. Older diesels should run fine with bio, its the newer ones with sensitive injection pumps and egr's that do not like bio. May need to upgrade your fuel filters though.
 

pmramsey

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I have been running waste cooking oil in my trucks for more six years. Here in Virginia, I am safe May to November as the gel pont on cooking oil is about 40 degrees compared to 20 on petro-diesel. Cooking oil has far more mositure in it that does not agree with steel fuel tanks. The by-product of the exhaust is CO2 and H2O...very clean.

What oil you put in is important. Petro-diesel and new unheated no-transfat soybeen oil have about 18-19 molicules in their component chains. Cheap oil starts with 20-22 molecules. Heating the oil modifies the number of modecules on the chains meaning the oil is altered. Oil like that at McDonalds that has been cooked at high heat, 24/7 for a week or so can have chains as high as 30-32 molecules. The higher the molecules in the chain the dirtier the fuel burn, the primary by-product being a black tar like substance much on the order of creosote the stuff that causes chimney fires. Trucks with mufflers are at risk of first loosing power and then shutdown and perhaps a raging fire in the exhaust noticed by a neighbor.

The molecules can be re-modified for use through a process using methene and lye. Northern Tool sells a device for doing it. I would not bother.

Using good clean cooking oil from establishments where you know the operater and the oils purchased and how they are used is rather safe. Make sure the oil is at least 70-80 degrees and pour it through a sleave lined with cheese cloth. Next, I have a 55-gal drum with a pipe running vertically out of the drum to a vehicle filter sitting below a 5-gal bucket mounted above the filter. I pour the oil into the bucket, it is filtered through the filter and deposited into the drum. I reclaim 75-100 gals a week. The biggest problem is flour and moisture in the oil that must be removed.

My Dodge Cummins runs OK but it will balk on start-up using more than 50% mix. It would benefit from more than a single oil filter. My 7.3L Powerstroke in the ambulance never complains. However, using two tanks, one with oil and one with petro, I start and stop at the end of the day with petro and run all day after engine warmup on the oil.

The CUCVs have their own starting issues without adding cooking oil to the problem. However, they run all day in the summer without a problem.

The Cat in the A3...I have not even considered it. I have tried some oil in the 5-tonners but not sufficiently to make a recommendation.

The 71 AM Gen Duce purrs on it. However, adding a quart of ATF here and there is a help. Cooking oil does makes a better upper cylinder lubricant. The truth is Hershey bars will run in our trucks if we could figure out how to get them through the injectors. However, don't ask me to repair one.
 

mudguppy

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Alright I'll probably end up posting this over on The Diesel Garage ... I've heard you guys talking about swapping the buttons. I've also read guys changing the PT pump and adding a seperate fuel line to the #1 plug. I've even read guys messin' with the tamper proof throttle screw. ...
i think i've seen some discussion on there (TDG) about the buttons. i'll bet you 50 pesos that Tony (ynot on TDG) will have the answers for you.
 
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