Our Dragoon

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Another Ahab

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Yeah, compared to the dragoon, the V-100 driver's area is roomy.

And you are correct, lots and lots of blind spots. That is why in addition to a different mirror system in the front, we're planning on putting in cameras, for 360 degree vision. Not so much as a military/tactical consideration, as to try and keep from turning Lincolns into Yugos, when driving it on the road.
You're not kidding:

https://youtu.be/t8GTHXTEvIc
 

baseballump

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Talking about the blind spot As a V driver in Nam we had truck mirrors on ours And to a man you will not find many that will tell you they drove very far with the seat down and the hatch closed. Number 1 you couldn't see anything the glass blocks had turn yellow, number 2 any time you hit a bump you're head hit the hatch (it hurt even with a steel pot on). number 3 bugs hurt when the hit your face we used helmets we go from the Air Force that had shields on the front (they would trade anything for c-rations)
 

Another Ahab

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T Number 1 you couldn't see anything the glass blocks had turn yellow, number 2 any time you hit a bump you're head hit the hatch (it hurt even with a steel pot on). number 3 bugs hurt when the hit your face we used helmets we go from the Air Force that had shields on the front (they would trade anything for c-rations)
The C-rations were a trade UP? What kind of nasty chow were those poor guys munching!?
 

Madmedic

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It wasn't so much that the C's were Better than what they were eating....(they weren't) it was more to do with the fact that the AF guys were REMFS and were extreme suckers for any kind of trinkets that they were told were "war" booty. ESPECIALLY FLIGHT CREWS. Even today, flight crews on the transports in many cases will stay with or near the aircraft the whole time. Un-load, re-load, and fly back out.

Taking advantage of the guys "in the rear, with the gear" by the front line combat troops is a long honored tradition. Back in Shield/Storm, while front line troops were still wearing woodland camo, all the REMFs got the chocolate chip camo and the desert boots. Started with Stormin Norman, and worked it's way down. So combat guys rotating through the rear would do everything they could (cough cough) legal to get their own. The "Scrounger" in the movie "The Green Berets" is a mild example of this.

We've got some of the big MRAP mirrors, that we're planning on replacing the originals with. Hadn't thought about the riot control helmets though. That's DEFINITELY a good idea.
 

Another Ahab

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It wasn't so much that the C's were Better than what they were eating....(they weren't) it was more to do with the fact that the AF guys were REMFS and were extreme suckers for any kind of trinkets that they were told were "war" booty. ESPECIALLY FLIGHT CREWS. Even today, flight crews on the transports in many cases will stay with or near the aircraft the whole time. Un-load, re-load, and fly back out.
Ohhh; I get it.

Yeah, I was wondering because in my experience everything Air Force was always a kind of a "hotel/ motel" lifestyle: the chow, the quarters; like they were an off-shoot of Marriott or something. Still not totally convinced it's entirely all military. :shrugs:

Thank you, makes sense now!
 
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Madmedic

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Yeahhhhhh..... clean sheets every night, mess hall tables with linens... they got it rough.

But you haven't seen upset until you see a cargo pilot when he finds out someone forgot the Capri Sun Juice pack, in their Air Force Issue in flight Box Lunch!!!
 

ODFever

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I'm looking forward to following your restoration. You have a very rare and very nice piece of history! :)
 

Madmedic

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Too true!!!

Engine appears to be FUBAR. While a replacement will not be hard to find, shop where it is located, is on a 30-60 Day hold on this project. They have a Gov. Contract that they have to attend to first.
 

L1A1

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That's a nice project you've got there! I thought the dragoons used the same powerpack that was in the M113(A1?) and the axles were from the 800 series 5 tons? Was thinking that the designers tried to use as much "off the shelf" components as possible to entice the army into buying. Smart thinking if it's true.

As for helmets, How about either the standard CVC helmet or one of the (helicopter) pilot's helmets with the movable eye visors? I've seen pics of V crewmen in Vietnam sporting those.....

Matt
 

Another Ahab

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That's a nice project you've got there! I thought the dragoons used the same powerpack that was in the M113(A1?) and the axles were from the 800 series 5 tons? Was thinking that the designers tried to use as much "off the shelf" components as possible to entice the army into buying. Smart thinking if it's true.
Matt
That would make sense on all kinds of levels.

So much so, that it's probably NOT true.
 

Madmedic

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In this specific vehicle, Engine, Transmission, and Axles, are all interchangeable with the 5 tons. That's why I say it won't be difficult to get a replacement. The operator's controls inside, are from the M113/M114 Family. The Diesel engine specifically was used because when this family of vehicles was being introduced, is the same time period in which the U.S. Military was deliberately going to ALL Diesel Engines for ALLLL purposes.

And interchangability was the desginer's intent. Also, with the controls mimicking the M113/M114, the intent was that vehicle operators trained on one, would have no problems with the other. MODERN ASV's have different engines, drive train, operator's controls etc.

CVC helmets with goggles, won't solve the bug problem. I'm not particularly fond of a grasshopper & Dragon Fly Diet. Crews in Viet Nam DID use AFH-1 and SPH-4 Helicopter Flight Helmets when they could get them from the aviation units. But seeing as how SPH-4's now run $150 or more,,, I think we'll stick with $20.00 steel pots and $2.00 Riot Control Shields. Plus the intercom system we are going to install, may or may not work with the boom mike of an SPH-4.
 

Madmedic

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Regretfully, nothing has changed in status. Our primary use intent, and user plan, fell through. They were offered Surplussed USMC LAV's and South African Wheeled APC's (Ratel's?) So they didn't need our's. Also, the shop where we have the vehicle located, has been socked in with Contractual Work, which hasn't left them any time to work on it. We've considered sending it to another shop, but other life priorities have also had a part to play in our in-action.

Recently, I've been contemplating all the ancillary/support costs that will be necessary when/if we we follow through with the restoration, Insurance, Towing/transport vehicles etc. And we're now leaning towards selling it, vs going through with the resto. We'll have made a final decision by August or September.
 

Another Ahab

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Recently, I've been contemplating all the ancillary/support costs that will be necessary when/if we we follow through with the restoration, Insurance, Towing/transport vehicles etc. And we're now leaning towards selling it, vs going through with the resto. We'll have made a final decision by August or September.
Oh, man, I'm starting to tear-up over here...



BBC.gif
 

M813rc

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MM, I hope it doesn't come to that. :sad:

Minimum required headgear for all personnel in my V is a CVC helmet with ballistic-lens goggles. I actually shot a pair of those goggles with a .22 - left a gouge, but didn't penetrate, so I figure they'll deflect a rock, or a kamikaze dragonfly.

I also made a redneck windshield for the V out of plexiglass, wood, and metal. It attaches onto the front of the hatch opening with C-clamps. It's not real pretty, but it's only on there while I'm actually driving, so as my dad would have said - "You won't see that from a trotting horse". Takes about 2 minutes to put on.

The shield is tall enough to deflect the airflow up and over, taking bugs, etc. with it, but low enough that my sightline just clears the top, so I'm not looking through it except when ducking the odd pigeon-sized grasshopper here and there.
It also deflects the icy blast of winter air over you, rather than straight into your face. "You live in Texas!!" I hear you say. True, and we had winter on a Thursday last year, but on the few days it's cold, it can be quite wintery (it was 13* a couple of days in January). If you happen to be driving 40 miles into Austin at 0600 to do a parade, when the air temp is 28, that wind can make a compelling argument.

I have an original Cad-Gage hatch cover, but it is not an easy on-off affair, and it's not worth the effort for the brief times I'd use it. It's basically a box with a sloped front, windshield glass on front, sides and back, metal top. Even has a wiper! But I have agreed to give that to another V owner who has coveted it for some time, and for whom winter/rain is a serious fact of life.

Cheers
 

Another Ahab

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It also deflects the icy blast of winter air over you, rather than straight into your face. "You live in Texas!!" I hear you say. True, and we had winter on a Thursday last year, but on the few days it's cold, it can be quite wintery (it was 13* a couple of days in January). If you happen to be driving 40 miles into Austin at 0600 to do a parade, when the air temp is 28, that wind can make a compelling argument.


:funny:
 

m715mike

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Madmedic - You've mentioned the Dragoon to me a couple of times, but I just found this thread today.

Wow! You have one awesome vehicle. I'm sorry to read that you are contemplating a sale as opposed to a restoration!!
 
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