Proper gear/range for using front bucket for excavation

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Sgt Jiggins

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Hello All,

I saw a thread the other day- that of course I can't now find- talking about which gears/range were best to use when using the front bucket for excavation. Something about contact/interference causing damage to (something?).

Since I'm about to embark on a big of digging, I thought I might ask if anyone recalls this thread/the knowledge it was imparting.

Thanks,
SJ
 

The FLU farm

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I don't remember what thread it's in, but basically we were warned not to have the splitter in low, just use direct First gear Low.

Either way, I don't think the loader is meant for digging, that's what the backhoe is for. Then the loose dirt can be moved with the loader.
 

Pinsandpitons

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+1 on direct not underdrive. I think that came up in the SEE HMMH HME thread. One thing i’ve found that helps is to deploy the hoe to vertical. The machine balance front to back really benefits from that even if the roll becomes more sensitive.
 

Sgt Jiggins

Potato Peeler
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Location
Lynchburg, VA
Thank guys. Not planning on doing anything crazy with the front bucket, but up until today hadn't used it for more than gravel/firewood/scraping. This machine, probably more than any other that I own, has so much institutional/tribal knowledge associated with it. I'm old enough that a)I can afford the machine and b)would rather not if I can learn without all the errors.

“Good judgment comes from experience, and experience comes from bad judgment.” - Rita Mae Brown
 

Speedwoble

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Yes, I asked the question in Post 4410 in the main owners thread. I was posing the question in response to Couchoffroad’s statement in Post 2034.

So everyone is using the same terminology, I believe his post to mean that the intermediate box, which is the Air shifted box between the engine and main transmission, has helical gears and this may create excessive thrust loads under large torques. On the other Unimog transmissions, the working gears are for low forward speeds with high engine speed when using the PTO, like to snowblow. The lowest gears are NOT for extra pulling or pushing torque. my understanding.
 
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peakbagger

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FYI the SEE is a loader not a bull dozer. It moves loose materials quite well but try to dig down into hard ground and it will stall out or in some situations stall and the engine will restart running backwards. If it does run backwards, quickly stall it as there is no lubrication going through the bearings when the engine is running backwards.
 

dmetalmiki

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Fir those of Not in the know..Can members please describe exactly WHAT they are trying to do use or carry out on what vehicle or equipment? When asking advice, and then we all can more easily follow the 'problem' and learn the 'solution'.
 
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Sgt Jiggins

Potato Peeler
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Location
Lynchburg, VA
Fir those of Not in the know..Can members please describe exactly WHAT they are trying to do use or carry out on what vehicle or equipment?
Hey, thanks for jumping on the thread. We're chatting about the front bucket/loader on a SEE/Unimog FLU-419. This machine, while versatile, can be a bit... involved... hence the question about a seemingly simple concept.

Have several cubic yards/meters of dirt to move this weekend, so this information is right on time.

Cheers,
SJ/JD
 

peakbagger

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Moving around several yards of dirt with the loader on a SEE is just what its made for. Leveling out rough terrain is definitely not unless the soil has been previously broken out unless someone got real lucky at the auction and picked up one of the very rare 419 models that have a bulldozer blade and even then I question how well its going to rip up compacted soil.
 

The FLU farm

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The blade works fine on regular dirt, a prairie dog infested pasture in this case. But it's not heavy enough to do actual dozing work on harder stuff. And if it does dig in, the SEE won't push it.

For moving larger amounts of dirt, the 10-foot snow pusher I put a cutting blade on is more effective. Of course, depending on the amount and distance, loading it in a dump trailer is my preferred method.DSCN0634.jpgDSCN0638.jpg
 
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