Repairing Jerry can Holes/Leaks Help

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Corvette1974

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now thats a great attitude to have! not too often you find a young kid with an attitude like that. keep that mode of thinking and you'll go far.
Thanks a lot! Figuring stuff out and problem solving is my favorite thing to do, especially with mechanical / mechanical type things. I am in school so this project might not happen anytime soon, but when it does I'll be sure to report back with the results.

Will
 

Nonotagain

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If you encountered problems silver soldering, I'll ask what if anything were you using for a flux?

I've fixed quite a few Jerry cans as well as Blitz cans that had pin holes along the seams. A wire brush and Handy Harmon Handi-flux has always worked.

I use an oxygen acetylene torch with a VERY small tip so as to not distort the metal anymore than needed. Once the can has been pressure tested, I POR-15 the inside.
 

Corvette1974

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If you encountered problems silver soldering, I'll ask what if anything were you using for a flux?

I've fixed quite a few Jerry cans as well as Blitz cans that had pin holes along the seams. A wire brush and Handy Harmon Handi-flux has always worked.

I use an oxygen acetylene torch with a VERY small tip so as to not distort the metal anymore than needed. Once the can has been pressure tested, I POR-15 the inside.
I am not at home, but it was just the silver solder that was like the same brand as the solder itselt next to it. Where do you get the handi flux? I have wire brushes. I do not have an oxy torch, only a propane torch. That may be my issue.

Will
 

m16ty

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I can't believe nobody has brought up how dangerous it is applying any heat or open flame to a flammable liquid container. It can blow up and kill you (even if empty). It's actually safer to weld on a completely full gas or diesel can than it is to weld on a empty one.

There are ways to safely weld on this can but I'd never advise it on a public forum. There have been many people killed or maimed doing this.
 

Corvette1974

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Oh dont worry I am well aware of that....but you are definitely right! The can was literally so dry it was like a desert on the inside, hadnt held fuel for probably a decade. There was no vapor at all, and plus I....tested it.....with the torch before I soldered it. Probably not the most safe method but it worked.

Thanks,
Will
 

quickfarms

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The marine, boating, industry is having issues with the new fuel with ethanol in it dissolving Fiberglas fuel tanks and the gummy residue wreaking Havoc with the fuel system. The marine industry is recommending that boats with fiberglass tanks run on aviation gas.
 

Heath_h49008

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No, it just isn't contaminated with ethanol.

Ethanol is a solvent for many things... many things used to seal and handle gasoline included.

All gasoline found outside of those labeled "E-Zero" or avgas, contains AT LEAST 10% Ethanol.
 

randini

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Hmm interesting.....It will be used only for diesel, so it shouldnt be a problem.



I tried using a propane torch and silver solder and it just beaded off....I was brought to my attention that it might be chemical contamination. Maybe I'll give it a shot. Regardless there are holes too big to braze.
Brazing and Soldering are two different techniques. Brazing is usually a bronze alloy, with a Acetyline torch, while soldering is using solder, with a propane torch/Iron. I have used brazing to cover holes well over a 1/2 inch.
 

rosco

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M16ty & others, brought up the hazards of using an open flame on a flamable fuel container - he is exactly right. Jerry cans, 55 gallon drums, and the like, with their rolled and crimped ends are especially dangerous. Regardless of how dry and absent of fuel they may seem to be, fuel & fuel residue can and does, become trapped in the rolled seam. When heat is applied to it, its driven out and can be enough to cause an explosion. Its not a procedure well known for extending longevity.
 

Nonotagain

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I am not at home, but it was just the silver solder that was like the same brand as the solder itselt next to it. Where do you get the handi flux? I have wire brushes. I do not have an oxy torch, only a propane torch. That may be my issue.

Will
I purchase my flux at one of the large weld supply houses.

In my case, Earl Beck Welding.

Airco should also have a flux available.
 

Corvette1974

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True about the brazing vs soldering....I dont have the ability to braze because I do not own an oxy torch. I'll do some more experimenting with the solder and flux. I have some pending projects (on my spring break I'm installing my new enigine into my Corvette).

I have already soldered on the can and it didnt blow up so hopefully I'm good for here on out. Is there an at home way to clear a tank of fuel?

Will
 

Triple Jim

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It's risky business, Will. I used soap and hot water 3 times on a motorcycle tank one time. Then I rinsed it and rigged a tube and a blower to force air through the tank to dry everything thoroughly for several hours. Then, before I did the braze repair, with the filler lid open, I waved my torch past, just to make sure it wasn't going to blow. A 3 foot long blue flame roared out for about 3 or 4 seconds. That did heat the tank enough to clear it, and I did braze it, but if I had the lid closed, I'm sure I would have gone to the hospital one way or another. The only fairly safe way I know of is to fill the tank with water except for a small bubble around where you're working, or fill it with something like carbon dioxide or argon, and be sure no air is left in it.
 

JOECOOL48

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What would be good for lining the inside of a jerry can it was mentioned that someone used POR-15. When I Googled it there were about 8 or 10 versions. Also how do you line the inside? Do you just pore some inside and then roll the can around,, spray?
thanks
 
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edgephoto

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I would use the fuel tank repair kit. I did it on my Jaguar 5 years ago. So far so good. A friend did his Triumph TR3 10 years ago still looks like new.
 

1800 Diesel

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.....I could fiberglass is - I have done much glassing on the 'vette.....but is fiberglass fuel resistant for long term?.....Will
Will,

Been off the grid for about 4 days...sorry for the delayed reply. No problem with FG & fuel. FG tanks are quite common in boats--both pleasure craft & commercial. I built the fuel tank in our diesel powered shrimp boat back in the early 80s & it has 55 gallons of fuel in it right now. It has never leaked.

The fuel tank on my sandblast compressor (gas powered) suffered from rust holes in the bottom at least 15 years ago and I did the repair on it--same as described above. At this moment it is full & gas & no leaks....I could add many more examples of repaired gas & diesel tanks but it would be boring reading....
 

Corvette1974

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Wow that fuel is extremely resiliant to removal! Is the "waving the torch past" a "good" method to clear it?

Good stuff about the FG and fuel. That is definitely what I'm going to use to fix this can, and probably many more fuel tanks/containers in the future.

That tank lining is something I've been meaning to try for a while now, this should be a good time to give it a shot.

Thanks for all the excellent information. I'm saving my money now for the Rausch creek rally, and if I have enough I'll repair this before hand to use during the trip [thumbzup]

Will
 

winglift

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I ran across this thread while looking for the best way to cover a pin hole on the bottom of my jerrycan. The rest of the bottom of the can looks great with no rust. Is brazing best for this?
 
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