Rust repair opinion?

Merc1973

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I am still in search of my first deuce, specifically one that does not need much, or any, body repair. There is a '67 M35A2 for sale (non-turbo, W/W) for $4500. What do you think of this door sill rust?

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clinto

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You'll end up cutting out the entire rocker panel and you'll end up having to do the area of the lower cowl (where the fender meets the cab). When you remove the fender to do this, you'll destroy the two captured nuts inside the rocker, so you'll be fixing them while you're in there as well.

If you're good at sheetmetal work and own a mig welder and know how to use it, it won't be a big deal. If you are not experienced, it will cost you. I have seen someone selling patch panels (TNJ?) but I don't know how good they are.

I thought there was a good thread out there showing what's involved, but I can't find it now.
 

swbradley1

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All kidding aside when I got to fix anything on mine it will be done the same way the military did. They weld patches over the rusted out spots and paint it.
 

m16ty

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The problem with rust like that is it is usually much worse behind what you see.

You could just wire brush and sand it as good as you can and fill it with Duraglas. It's not the best way but Duraglas holds great if you get most of the rust out of the repair and it should last for years.
 

dikwks

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Try using a holesaw in the upper horizontal surface of the sill. Make your hole to gain access to the backside. cut out the bad stuff, insert sheet metal behind the hole,tack it in, grind tacks smooth, add bondo as needed, and paint. The hole will allow you seal the metal on the backside and get the crumbs out as well. If the hole(s) bug you when you're done, get electrical panel hole plugs, insert and paint. make sure you cut the hole the right size.
 

Merc1973

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Thanks for everyone's input. I think I will pass on this truck, especially since I don't have access to a welder or sandblaster to find more rotting sheet metal. The paint looks relatively new (within the last decade) so who knows what else is hidden. Thanks!

Clinto, I do recall coming across that thread a while ago with the patch panels, it was very informative. Looks to be out of my skill range for now.

Off Topic:
I guess the days of buying cheap low mileage trucks are long gone. There is also another Deuce for sale, very clean, hard top, troop seats, 16,000 miles but it is W/O Winch and also non-turbo for $3500. I would love to install a turbo and winch on it myself.

Are my figures close?

Add turbo ~$700
Add Winch ~$1000-1500
 

Jeepsinker

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You could easily double those figures unless you have a good hookup on parts. Remember that for example, adding a turbo doesn't mean just buying a $700 dollar turbo and throwing it on. There are lots of other parts and pieces that you would need that you may not even know you need, and they all cost money. The same goes with the winch setup. Sometimes it's cheaper to just buy a truck that is already set up the way you want it.
 

zout

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Think that rust spot is bad - take it to a pro sandblasting place and nearly 1/2 your cab will be gone - they are ruthless sometimes - always better to do it yourself.
See in the forum the paint and bodywork threads - tons of information in there for ideas.
 

Heath_h49008

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That is nothing. I have one exactly like it on my passenger side. I also sandblasted the whole truck in a professional booth and it remained the only spot of rust on my truck afterwards.

To patch it is easy as well. Take a cut-off wheel and a grinder and cut a rectangle 1/4" from the bends all along the sill. Use anything you want... sand blasting with a little $20 top feed Harbor Freight gun, or wire brushes... it doesn't really matter. And seal the inside of the void with weld through primer that has a high zinc content to prevent future rust.

Cut a rectangle of 18ga sheet and have the local muffler shop weld it in place. Prime paint and forget.
 

hndrsonj

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I'd still say spend 2-400 on a rust free cab and spend 8-10 hours swapping it.
 

Ray70

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I've been doing bodywork and paint on antique vehicles for almost 30 years and here's my 2cents on rust patches.
Welding in patch panels isn't all that difficult but a couple pointers to help make it a lasting repair.... cut out any rot that you can and sandblast any remaining rust. Although it is much more difficult, try butt welding wherever possible and avoid lap welds that can trap moisture if they can't be sealed from the back side. Continuous weld beads will warp your sheetmetal and probably cause blow-throughs. Do small stitch welds, but continue stitching until you have fully welded the perimiter. Spot welds with space between them will allow moisture to penetrate through from the back. Always use a non-porus filler such as Duraglass or Allmetal for your first coat over the weld seam, never put regular lightweight bodyfiller directly over a weld seam because any moisture that might come through from the back side will be absorbed by the filler and cause more bubbling and rust at the weld seam. Lastly, whenever possible, seal the back side of the patch with a coat of duraglass, seam sealer or other rust inhibitor to prevent moisture from coming through from the back side. Never put undercoating directly over bare metal without priming and painting first! Avoid using lacquer based primers, they shrink over time and absorb moisture like a sponge if not topcoated. Use a 2K epoxy over bare steel and a 2K urethane primer/surfacer on your finished surfaces before paint.
 

nyoffroad

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I've been doing bodywork and paint on antique vehicles for almost 30 years and here's my 2cents on rust patches.
Welding in patch panels isn't all that difficult but a couple pointers to help make it a lasting repair.... cut out any rot that you can and sandblast any remaining rust. Although it is much more difficult, try butt welding wherever possible and avoid lap welds that can trap moisture if they can't be sealed from the back side. Continuous weld beads will warp your sheetmetal and probably cause blow-throughs. Do small stitch welds, but continue stitching until you have fully welded the perimiter. Spot welds with space between them will allow moisture to penetrate through from the back. Always use a non-porus filler such as Duraglass or Allmetal for your first coat over the weld seam, never put regular lightweight bodyfiller directly over a weld seam because any moisture that might come through from the back side will be absorbed by the filler and cause more bubbling and rust at the weld seam. Lastly, whenever possible, seal the back side of the patch with a coat of duraglass, seam sealer or other rust inhibitor to prevent moisture from coming through from the back side. Never put undercoating directly over bare metal without priming and painting first! Avoid using lacquer based primers, they shrink over time and absorb moisture like a sponge if not topcoated. Use a 2K epoxy over bare steel and a 2K urethane primer/surfacer on your finished surfaces before paint.
WOW ! I think you just covered more than the kids learn in two years of vocational school :)

You covered it all cept metal adhesive, ever try it? Seems they all work ggod to great.
 

Ray70

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Thanks... Actually I have used SEM's epoxy panel adhesives several times. I like using it in areas that wouls be prone to rusting from the back side if you were to weld in a patch panel.
The Ford Super Duty pickups for example rot out around the wheel wells a lot, so if I put in a weel well patch I usually weld the perimiter of the panel except for the bottom edge along the wheel well opening. That lower edge is where I use the panel adhesive, but the stuff is so strong there's no reason you couldn't attach the entire panel with it. With the technology available these days, the products available are far superior to the sutff available 20 years or even 10 years ago. It really saves time and makes for a much more lasting and durable repair.
Good Luck!
 

tobyS

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I hate to even mention it, but multi-directional fiberglass cloth can provide a good short to medium term fix. Preparation would be about the same (remove rust then primer/paint)... but no weld required. This method does require a bit of skill to make it last and be entirely straight, but to a person that is not a welder, may be an alternative. I do weld and am still thinking about a fender repair with glass.
 

ducer

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The bad thing about repairing steel with fiberglass is that the resin is not completely waterproof. Over a legnth of time rust will eventually form between the steel and patch.

Denny
 

Ray70

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With fiberglass you also tend to have problems caused by different expansion rates between fiberglass and steel, especially on dark colors when exposed to the sun. Might not be an big issue in this application, but it can cause undesireable, noticeable seams when used in a show car applications. However, in some instances you can get delamination and rust problems where the 2 materials meet. Overlapping the glass mat on the back side as well as the front ( if possible ) would help minimize water intrusion and rust formation.
 
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