Torsen Differential

martinv

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I was looking at an explanation of the Torsen, Eaton Trutrac differential (Youtube link below)
Is this style differential available for a Deuce? It appears it is used in the HMMWV.
What are the disadvantages of the Torsen?

Torsen example at ~6:03:
https://youtu.be/x40WGUtdaLI?t=363
 
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sandcobra164

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I'm not sure if a Torsen is available for a Deuce but my Trans Am has one from the factory and it works quite well. If you read around on F-Body forums they don't seem to stand up well to drag racing but most people agree they are great for road courses. I've had no issues in 156,000 miles of driving and it gets a work out each time it rains and the dirt road is muddy.
 

rustystud

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I was looking at an explanation of the Torsen, Eaton Trutrac differential (Youtube link below)
Is this style differential available for a Deuce? It appears it is used in the HMMWV.
What are the disadvantages of the Torsen?

Torsen example at ~6:03:
https://youtu.be/x40WGUtdaLI?t=363
The "Torsen-Gleason" differential was designed in 1959. It didn't see mass usage though until the late 1980's through early 2000's. The military was one of the first to nab onto the idea. They have used it for years now. The biggest problem with them is cost. They are much more expensive then say a "Detroit locker" style. They also are one of the only true lockers out there along with the "Detroit Locker" and "Gov locks" and a few others. The rest are all "slip" lockers. You will never see one for the deuce though. It would cost too much to develop it for such a limited market. Just be happy that "Grizzly" and "ARB" each makes one for the Deuce.
 
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winfred

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the only thing i can think of is some designs will open up without enough resistance from the opposing wheel for the rollers to act, so if you pick up a wheel it may not lock. i built one for a bmw i use to autocross and it worked great, a clutch style posi didn't have enough lock up for the stiffness of the suspension i ended up at and would still pegleg on aggressive low speed turns
 

73m819

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When I talked to Eaton about a 08 locker issue, I was told that ALL lockers need the axle tires need to be as close in size as possible, brake drag be as close as possible or EXTREAM ware WILL cause failure, in the 08s case, it had a brake try to lock up which in turn burnt the clutch so it no longer worked free then it just got worse with use. He said that lot of lockers get tore up because a SPARE is used that does not match the other tire and about the only other thing that WILL screw up a locker is to thin gear oil.
 

rustystud

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When I talked to Eaton about a 08 locker issue, I was told that ALL lockers need the axle tires need to be as close in size as possible, brake drag be as close as possible or EXTREAM ware WILL cause failure, in the 08s case, it had a brake try to lock up which in turn burnt the clutch so it no longer worked free then it just got worse with use. He said that lot of lockers get tore up because a SPARE is used that does not match the other tire and about the only other thing that WILL screw up a locker is to thin gear oil.
Was this a "friction locker" differential you had ? You mentioned a "burnt clutch" . That would only be used in a friction type locker. A Detroit locker or a Torsen Locker has no clutches.
 

73m819

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Was this a "friction locker" differential you had ? You mentioned a "burnt clutch" . That would only be used in a friction type locker. A Detroit locker or a Torsen Locker has no clutches.
This is what EATON calls the slipping assembly "CLUTCH ASSEMBLY", the 08 has a Eaton locker and according to the Eaton rep. the need for both ends of a locker axle to be the same to avoid extreme ware applies to ALL locker style axles no matter the type of locker.
 

Welder1

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The "Torsen-Gleason" differential was designed in the 1980's. It didn't see mass usage though until the late 1990's early 2000's. The military was one of the first to nab onto the idea. They have used it for years now. The biggest problem with them is cost. They are much more expensive then say a "Detroit locker" style. They also are one of the only true lockers out there along with the "Detroit Locker" and "Gov locks" and a few others. The rest are all "slip" lockers. You will never see one for the deuce though. It would cost too much to develop it for such a limited market. Just be happy that "Grizzly" and "ARB" each makes one for the Deuce.
Actually the design is from the late 50's. Here is the origins of the gear system
Jump to search
Torsen differential from an Audi quattro


Torsen Torque-Sensing (full name Torsen traction) is a type of limited-slip differential used in automobiles.
It was invented by American Vernon Gleasman[SUP][1][/SUP] and manufactured by the Gleason Corporation. Torsen is a contraction of Torque-Sensing. TORSEN and TORSEN Traction are registered trademarks of JTEKT Torsen North America Inc (formerly Zexel Corporation, formerly Gleason Power Systems). All Torsen differentials have their origin in the Dual-Drive Differential that was invented and patented by Gleasman in 1958.
 

rustystud

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Actually the design is from the late 50's. Here is the origins of the gear system
Jump to search
Torsen differential from an Audi quattro


Torsen Torque-Sensing (full name Torsen traction) is a type of limited-slip differential used in automobiles.
It was invented by American Vernon Gleasman[SUP][1][/SUP] and manufactured by the Gleason Corporation. Torsen is a contraction of Torque-Sensing. TORSEN and TORSEN Traction are registered trademarks of JTEKT Torsen North America Inc (formerly Zexel Corporation, formerly Gleason Power Systems). All Torsen differentials have their origin in the Dual-Drive Differential that was invented and patented by Gleasman in 1958.
Now that is interesting. I first heard of the Torsen/Gleason back in 1979. That is why I assumed it was designed then. I didn't see any applications for it until the 1980's though.
I guess I need to quite posting things from my memory. Now that there is Wikipedia anyone can become an "expert" by just looking it up there.
 
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Floridianson

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That and google is our friend. I can hardly remember what I had for dinner last night much less in 1979. Do remember I was 26 and working offshore as the engineer 200 ton tugs and big Alco's.
 

snowtrac nome

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Let see in 79 I was building plastic models and wanted a dodge w150 so bad I could taste it by the time I got old enough to drive dodge trucks didn't look the same and I haad to settle for an international 1200 because that's all I could afford on part time work pay. Just to show how little the dollar buys today the kid working with me just bought a side by side that cost more than my first gen dodge cummins did in 89.
 

rustystud

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Let see in 79 I was building plastic models and wanted a dodge w150 so bad I could taste it by the time I got old enough to drive dodge trucks didn't look the same and I haad to settle for an international 1200 because that's all I could afford on part time work pay. Just to show how little the dollar buys today the kid working with me just bought a side by side that cost more than my first gen dodge cummins did in 89.
Hey, there's nothing wrong with a IHC 1200 ! That was a great truck. Wished I still had the ones I had just a few years ago.
 

Welder1

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In 1979 I was working at "Neals Detroit Diesel" on Allison transmissions. Looking back, that was a pretty good job.
In 1979 I graduated from Engineering school Ga Tech with a Mechanical degree and began working for Procter & Gamble at the Albany Ga paper plant. I am still there today working as a Senior Engineer. I will complete 40 years next year.
 

rustystud

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In 1979 I graduated from Engineering school Ga Tech with a Mechanical degree and began working for Procter & Gamble at the Albany Ga paper plant. I am still there today working as a Senior Engineer. I will complete 40 years next year.
WOW ! The same job for 40 years. That is extremely rare in todays world. They better give you the gold watch when you retire !
So your a mechanical engineer. Have you ever looked at the deuce rear tailgate ? A while back I was trying to figure out a simple way of lowering and raising that tailgate without leaving my guts on the road !
It would be nice to have an engineer take a look at this problem. I'm no engineer, just an old mechanic. So this kind of thing is not up my alley. I was thinking about using either a air cylinder or hydraulic cylinder to do the lifting and lowering.
I know this is not the appropriate thread, so we could go over to that old thread and revive it.
 

QUADJEEPER

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I installed a GT diff. in my '79 Chevy front axle around 1981. Worked well for awhile then sheared off some worm gear teeth and failed. Replaced it with a True Trac diff, was still good 24 year later when I sold the truck.
 

cattlerepairman

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In 1979 I was in school and was not old enough...to do anything, really. I did like big trucks, though and wrenched on cars with my dad!
 
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