Why are the splines of my MTV driveshaft dipped in plastic?? And is this too much movement??

mrjeffa

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That is Anti-seize, It prevents the drive shaft and the knuckle from seizing together that's why it's coated

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mrjeffa

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Meritor, I am not familiar with, I have always run spicer, I even have updated driver train in my polaris 1000 rzr to Spicer u joints,


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simp5782

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Meritor, spicer, neapco are all on the same level.

There are 3 different quality lines of spicer, red box, blue box, purple box.

World American makes a decent product as well that is much cheaper.

You grease them even with anti seize coating cause you don't know what environment it's going to be in and how often it'll be moved.

There are trucks in the military that don't move for 5 or more years. Even longer than that if they get put in the caves.
 

mrjeffa

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I live in Texas, we Run spicer here, most of the parts houses have them, napa.com, always our go too. you can get everything from them. Blue spicer we use up to 400hp, purple 400+ hp. We do alot of muddy here. Hope this helps. The other brands are new to me. I am going to check them out.

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Ronmar

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In the manual there is a hinging test that uses a dial indicator and magnetic base at a particular location on one side and reaches across to measure the movement at a specific spot on the other side while installed. You zero the dial then push up on the shaft and measure the displacement. It is not a lot, and as a rule if you can feel it move, it is something greater than about .005…
 

87cr250r

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It's a nylon or epoxy coating that contains lubricant. It prevents fretting wear caused by normal movements of the coupling. There are a few suppliers of these types of coatings.

 

RRaulston

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I dropped off the intermediate drive shaft off today at the shop. The owner indicated the coating was designed to wear less than metal on metal splines and was more forgiving to drivelines that rarely got greased. He did say that I had the 2" splines and would remove the cardboard, if present, in the shaft. What I didn't know is that I needed the new u-joints installed in order for him to check balance. I dropped it off with no U-joints. He had the Spicers so I said go for it.... Just waiting on the phone call. He indicated he would let me know if he could rebuild it or if a re-spline was necessary. 😨
 

coachgeo

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North of Cincy OH
I dropped off the intermediate drive shaft off today at the shop. The owner indicated the coating was designed to wear less than metal on metal splines and was more forgiving to drivelines that rarely got greased. He did say that I had the 2" splines and would remove the cardboard, if present, in the shaft. What I didn't know is that I needed the new u-joints installed in order for him to check balance. I dropped it off with no U-joints. He had the Spicers so I said go for it.... Just waiting on the phone call. He indicated he would let me know if he could rebuild it or if a re-spline was necessary. 😨
He has the spicer on hand likely cause that is what many of the larger commercial trucks (dump trucks, busses, 18wheelers etc?).
 

87cr250r

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"The owner indicated the coating was designed to wear less than metal on metal splines and was more forgiving to drivelines that rarely got greased."

Well, these ones should never get greased. You don't want to damage the coating. Grease has forever been problematic in splines as the rotation centrifuges the oil from the grease thickener and there is no stirring action to bring it back into suspension. Shear stable greases with polyurea thickeners do work well on splines but we all know what general public knows about greases (they're all the same or mine is best)
 

RRaulston

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Location
Sahuarita, Arizona
"The owner indicated the coating was designed to wear less than metal on metal splines and was more forgiving to drivelines that rarely got greased."

Well, these ones should never get greased. You don't want to damage the coating. Grease has forever been problematic in splines as the rotation centrifuges the oil from the grease thickener and there is no stirring action to bring it back into suspension. Shear stable greases with polyurea thickeners do work well on splines but we all know what general public knows about greases (they're all the same or mine is best)
Interesting. While i'm thinking the "hinging" issue is compounded by the coating as the investigation suggest, he is telling me its desirable to have the coating over a steel-on-steel spline... I find it fascinating that even the simplest of parts can be technical.
 
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